West Seattle history 691 results

20 years after 9/11: Seattle firefighters honor their fallen colleagues

Those on duty at Seattle’s 33 fire stations took a moment at 8:46 am to pause and remember the 343 firefighters who lost their lives because of the 9/11 attacks. We were at Station 32 in The Junction for the brief remembrance.

The list of names was divided between the stations to be read aloud during the ceremony. Here are the names read at Station 32:

Benjamin Suarez
Daniel Suhr
Lt, Christopher Sullivan
Brian Edward Sweeney
Sean Tallon
Allan Tarasiewicz
Brian Tegtmeier
John Tiemey
John Tipping II
Hector Tirado
Richard Vanhine

City leaders are holding a remembrance ceremony right now (we’ll link the recording when it’s available).

20 years after 9/11: At Alki Statue of Liberty

Thanks to Allen for the photos. Along with flowers, someone has left a pictorial memorial at the Alki Statue of Liberty, which became a Seattle gathering place after the 9/11 attacks,

While hundreds gathered there for a 10th-anniversary vigil in 2011, nothing formal is planned today/tonight.

SIDE NOTE: On 9/11/2007, the refurbished statue was unveiled. The plaza surrounding it, with a new pedestal for the statue, was dedicated a year later.

20 years after 9/11: Southwest Seattle Historical Society wants to hear from you

(SWSHS photo: Memory album and luminaria bags from 2001)

Tomorrow marks 20 years since the 9/11 attacks. While no major commemorations are planned in West Seattle, the Southwest Seattle Historical Society is looking for your reflections:

This weekend, the Southwest Seattle Historical Society invites you to reflect on the events of September 11, 2001. Although two decades have passed in the blink of an eye, memories remain fresh in our minds about the heroism, terror, unity, and change generated that day. As a community and nation, we have pledged to never forget the tragedy that unfolded and the Southwest Seattle Historical Society invites you to remember and reflect.

We are collecting diary entries to document your reflections, experiences, and thoughts. Where were you on September 11, 2001? What do you remember about that day? Have your thoughts about September 11, 2001 changed in the twenty years that have passed? How have the events of September 11, 2001 shaped your life and that of your community?

Please share your reflections with us. To do so, please visit: loghousemuseum.org/blog/remembering-september-11-2001

Ten years ago, on the 10th anniversary, hundreds gathered for a vigil at the Alki Statue of Liberty, which became a gathering place for mourners in 2001.

UPDATE: Alki Point Lighthouse opening for first tours since pre-pandemic

(2015 photo by Long Bach Nguyen)

3:46 PM: Just in from Debra Alderman of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary:

We are offering timed tickets for groups of friends or family members (up to 10 people per group) for Alki Point Lighthouse guided tours on the afternoons of September 19 and 26th. The 30-minute timeslots on the 19th may already be booked up but there’s still availability on the 26th. Reservations for the free tours are available on this site while supplies last: calendly.com/cgauxiliaryseattle/30min

If we have any no shows or unclaimed time slots, we’ll allow walkups to fill them. Masks will be required.

The lighthouse is where Beach Drive SW and Alki Avenue SW meet.

6:20 PM: The reservations are all taken but here’s an update from Debra: “If you would like to be added to the wait list/standby list for a tour on one of these weekends or in the future, please email: alkilighthouse@cgauxseattle.org

Registration open for bicycle tour of West Seattle’s musical history

Just announced: A limited-participation ride that’ll take you on a tour of local musical history:

The Southwest Seattle Historical Society is delighted to announce the return of Cycle History in partnership with West Seattle Bike Connections for the fifth year in a row. Cycle History, Sound Spots is happening Saturday, September 18 2021! Please plan to arrive at 9:15 am and be ready to ride at 9:30. Registration is required to participate in this ride. This program is limited to 25 participants.

Join us for an in-person ride through West Seattle’s Admiral District starting and ending at Hiawatha Playfield and Community Center. This year, we’ll be exploring highlights of West Seattle’s musical history. From jazz to grunge, we’ll have stops to please music lovers, bike enthusiasts, and everyone in between!

Seattle is famous for its grunge scene, but our music history goes far and wide. Some of the best hits were created right in West Seattle! We’ll explore locations where music was made, where historic artists performed, and talk about the local and national impact of West Seattle on music history.

To register, please visit loghousemuseum.org/exhibits/cycle-history-sound-spots-bike-dont-run/. For more information, please contact Maggie Kase, Curator, at maggiek@loghousemuseum.org.

GIVING: West Seattle Art Club donates bench for Log House Museum

(Photos courtesy Southwest Seattle Historical Society)

That bench is now gracing the grounds of the Log House Museum, after a donation announced today:

The Southwest Seattle Historical Society is thrilled to announce that West Seattle Art Club has generously donated a sculptural art bench for permanent use on the grounds of the Log House Museum. Formed in 1910, the West Seattle Art Club, which has enjoyed a long history of support and involvement with the arts community, especially the Seattle Art Museum, will close its doors this year. The bench generously donated to the Historical Society will memorialize the Club and its vibrant history for generations to come inviting visitors to sit, relax, and enjoy the Log House Museum’s garden.

The memorial bench, which was created and installed by Kris Myrseth-Barrea, was officially unveiled in a ceremony hosted by the Historical Society earlier today. The bench was designed and fabricated to reflect the artist’s vision of the natural beauty of the Pacific Northwest.

Members of the West Seattle Art Club (above) and their families were joined on-site at the Log House Museum by Historical Society staff and Trustees to dedicate the bench and celebrate its placement. Of the generous contribution, Historical Society executive director Michael King remarked, “The Historical Society is incredibly grateful to the West Seattle Art Club for its donation of this beautiful bench, which will serve as a welcoming centerpiece to our native plant garden for generations to come. We are proud to be able to honor the memory of the West Seattle Art Club and deeply appreciative of the Club’s support of and commitment to the Historical Society and the community we call home.”

“While we are saddened to bring our long history to a close, we are delighted to place this wonderful creation at the LHM. We so appreciate the generosity of providing our Club such a perfect site. We feel the LHM perfectly matches our deep roots in the WS community and the placement of the bench in the native plant garden is so lovely and so fitting as a memorial location,” said CR Hendrick, president of the West Seattle Art Club.

The museum at 3003 61st SW is open noon-4 pm Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays.

PHOTOS/VIDEO: Stone Cottage makes the move (updated)

12:22 AM: The next big chapter in the Stone Cottage‘s history is being written tonight, with the little stone-studded house getting moved off its soon-to-be-redeveloped site at 1123 Harbor Avenue SW. Destination: Port of Seattle land about a mile southeast, until a permanent home is found.

A crowd is here to watch renowned structural movers Nickel Bros take the house to its interim home; we’ll be updating as it goes. (Added: Among those present were family members of Eva Falk, the cottage’s creator.) First, shown above, the truck is moving into position.

1:03 AM: At least another 20 minutes until they start pulling the Stone Cottage off the site – which’ll be tricky, with a power pole close to its east side, a hydrant close to its west side.

1:51 AM: The moving has begun – in short bursts for starters as they carefully maneuver off the site.

2:35 AM: Still maneuvering. Some lines/cables are the newest hurdle to clear. … Ten minutes later, inching around the hydrant.

2:54 AM: Off the site! Now dealing with hydraulics to get under road-spanning wires.

3:06 AM: It’s now rolling down the road.

4 AN: Back at HQ, adding photos and video above. Plus – the next two, sent by Rachel, with a view from over Harbor Avenue as the Stone Cottage rolled by Don Armeni:

And here’s a pic from the pre-move wait – group photo of Save The Stone Cottage volunteers, whose many months of work (along with community support) made this happen:

(They were the ones cheering loudest toward the end of our video clip above.) We’ll be following up to see what’s next.

ADDED WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON: Thanks to Stewart L. for the photo of the Stone Cottage after arrival at its temporary home:

Mike Shaughnessy of Save The Stone Cottage tells WSB that the Stone Cottage reached its interim site at 4:45 am – 15 minutes shy of when their street-use permit expired. “It was touch and go … threading the needle between cars, and we almost got stuck near 7-Eleven.”

And talk about touch and go … hours after the Stone Cottage was gone, the developers who own its former site demolished the remaining structures:

(That photo also is from Stewart L.)

STONE COTTAGE MOVE: Still happening tonight, but without public events

(WSB photo)

2:22 PM: We’ve just learned from members of Save The Stone Cottage that there’s been a change in plan for tonight’s move. It’s still happening – but minus the hoopla: No ceremonial events, no mini-parade, just the move. What happened is that the moving firm, Nickel Bros, had a positive COVID test – and even though the person who tested positive is NOT on the crew that will be handling tonight’s move, “out of an abundance of caution,” Save The Stone Cottage’s Jeff McCord explains, they decided to cancel the public-spectacle part of the plan. The winning bidders in their auction for ceremonial roles in the event, for example, will get refunds. More details to come.

3:06 PM: The full update we’ve since received from Save The Stone Cottage explains, “Nickel Bros contacted the Save the Stone Cottage committee on Monday evening as soon as its COVID case emerged and possible contact exposures within the Nickel Bros crew had been discovered. The company administered rapid tests to its entire crew early this morning. Two Nickel Bros crew members tested positive for COVID and are quarantining.” One more note: “Those interested in seeing the move take place can still do so, but the Save the Stone Cottage committee recommends that they stay inside vehicles and distanced from the moving staff.”

REMINDER: Stone Cottage to roll down Harbor Avenue late Tuesday night

Another reminder – tomorrow night is when the historic Stone Cottage will be moved off its original site at 1123 Harbor Avenue SW, taken by structural-moving specialists Nickel Bros to a temporary holding site on Port of Seattle land to the east/southeast. Over the weekend, we published the plan for moving night – even if you’re not planning to go watch, be aware of the traffic effects. In case you missed it, here again are the key points, from the group that’s coordinating the move, Save The Stone Cottage:

Approximately 8 p.m.: Nickel Bros’ crew will maneuver the Stone Cottage from wooden cribbing piles onto oversized dollies, and connect them to the semi-truck.

11:30 p.m.: Special remarks by VIP’s at the Information area,

11:55 p.m.: VIP’s lead a countdown, then the ‘Big Go Button’ is pressed by the Save the Stone Cottage auction winner. Lights and fog will erupt from the Stone Cottage.

11:59 p.m.: Drivers and riders enter their convoy vehicles: Nickel Bros Truck Cab, Pilot Car, and Sweeper Car

12:05 a.m.: Nickel Bros truck pulls the Stone Cottage into the Harbor Avenue SW roadway and gets in line between the Pilot Car and the Sweeper Car.

12:15 a.m.: Stone Cottage convoy heads south on Harbor Avenue SW at parade speed – approx 5mph. The rolling convoy may stop to let vehicular traffic from cross street through.

By 1 a.m.: Nickel Bros truck pulls the Stone Cottage through the SW Florida Street gates while the Pilot Car and Sweeper Car turn around and head back to the starting point.

By 2 a.m.: Nickel Bros crew will have the Stone Cottage securely parked onto wooden piers in the Port of Seattle storage lot.

During the move:

No public will be allowed in or near the Nickel Bros Stone Cottage work crew area on the west side of Harbor Ave at Maryland Place.

No public will be allowed within the driving roadway during the move.

The Harbor Avenue SW ‘No-Parking zones’ will ONLY be along Don Armeni Boat Launch and near the Calif. Ave intersection.

SDOT and SPD are responsible for maintaining one-way vehicular flow along eastern side of Harbor Avenue SW during the move. .

Sidewalk closure on the west side 1100 block of Harbor Avenue SW (Stone Cottage block)

Sidewalks along Harbor Avenue SW will provide great elevated viewing opportunities.

SIDE NOTE #1: Save The Stone Cottage, which has led the community campaign to save it, notes that their effort is noted in this summer’s edition of Preservation Magazine, published by the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

SIDE NOTE #2: Never seen a house move before? Here’s our coverage, with video, from a move almost three years ago at a development site just a few blocks from the Stone Cottage.

STONE COTTAGE MOVE: Extra day to bid on being part of it; plus, see the schedule for the big night

(WSB photo)

If you’ve been considering bidding to be part of the historic Stone Cottage‘s move next week (late Tuesday/early Wednesday), you have extra time. The group that’s been working to preserve it, Save The Stone Cottage, has an update. They’ve also announced the timeline for the move. First, the auction reminder:

The stone-studded cottage at 1123 Harbor Ave SW has been a beloved and legendary landmark in West Seattle for 90 years. Threatened with demolition, the Stone Cottage has been saved by the community, and is going to be moved into storage the night of August 17.

The Save the Stone Cottage has extended the bidding deadline of the ‘First Mile’ Auction another 24 hours. This Auction offers fans of the Stone Cottage the opportunity to bid on five separate packages that epitomize moving the Stone Cottage:

Lead the Move — Ride in the Pilot Car
Launch the Convoy — Push The Blast-Off Button
Backseat Driver — Ride in the Moving Rig
Shadow the Convoy — Ride in the Sweeper Car
Wave-in the Convoy — Finish Line Checkered Flag

Prefer sleeping during the midnight move? Consider a ‘Buy The Mile’ per-foot donation for the haul route.

With this extension, the Save the Stone Cottage ‘First Mile’ Auction website will remain open for bids through 4 pm on Sunday, August 15. Highest bid winners will be notified of their status and specific move details beginning at 6 pm Sunday, August 15.

Visit The ‘First Mile’ Auction site to bid and start the fun. The ‘First Mile’ Auction site is hosted by the Southwest Seattle Historical Society and we are grateful for its auction expertise.

Save the Stone Cottage LLC has raised more than $82,000 of the $110,000 donation goal to execute a phased plan to rescue, relocate and restore the Stone Cottage. Donations are still being accepted through the website savethestonecottage.org and a GoFundMe charity account. The Southwest Seattle Historical Society, a tax exempt 501(c)(3) organization, is serving as the fiscal sponsor of the Save the Stone Cottage Project. We appreciate its steadfast participation.

Now, here’s what you need to know if you’re planning on watching Tuesday night – first, the schedule:

Approximately 8 p.m.: Nickel Bros’ crew will maneuver the Stone Cottage from wooden cribbing piles onto oversized dollies, and connect them to the semi-truck.

11:30 p.m.: Special remarks by VIP’s at the Information area,

11:55 p.m.: VIP’s lead a countdown, then the ‘Big Go Button’ is pressed by the Save the Stone Cottage auction winner. Lights and fog will erupt from the Stone Cottage.

11:59 p.m.: Drivers and riders enter their convoy vehicles: Nickel Bros Truck Cab, Pilot Car, and Sweeper Car

12:05 a.m.: Nickel Bros truck pulls the Stone Cottage into the Harbor Avenue SW roadway and gets in line between the Pilot Car and the Sweeper Car.

12:15 a.m.: Stone Cottage convoy heads south on Harbor Avenue SW at parade speed – approx 5mph. The rolling convoy may stop to let vehicular traffic from cross street through.

By 1 a.m.: Nickel Bros truck pulls the Stone Cottage through the SW Florida Street gates while the Pilot Car and Sweeper Car turn around and head back to the starting point.

By 2 a.m.: Nickel Bros crew will have the Stone Cottage securely parked onto wooden piers in the Port of Seattle storage lot.

Some things you need to know regarding the route:

No public will be allowed in or near the Nickel Bros Stone Cottage work crew area on the west side of Harbor Ave at Maryland Place.

No public will be allowed within the driving roadway during the move.

No Parking will be allowed on the east side of Harbor Ave SW between the Don Armeni boat launch entrance and SW Florida Street.

SDOT and SPD are responsible for maintaining one-way vehicular flow along eastern side of Harbor Avenue SW during the move. .

Sidewalks along Harbor Avenue SW will provide great elevated viewing opportunities.

Two and a half years have passed since we first reported on local preservationists’ campaign to save the quirky little house after its site was bought by a developer.

FOLLOWUP: Date set for West Seattle’s Stone Cottage to be moved; here’s how you can do more than watch

(April photo by Mike Shaughnessy of Save the Stone Cottage)

West Seattle’s historic Stone Cottage finally has a moving date – one week from tomorrow. Announced this afternoon by the volunteer preservationists of Save the Stone Cottage:

The moving date is SET! The historic Stone Cottage is about to embark on its First Mile road trip, and the Save the Stone Cottage team is celebrating this big step with an online auction complete with once-in-a-lifetime opportunities.

The stone-studded cottage has been a beloved and legendary landmark in West Seattle for 90 years. Threatened with demolition, the Stone Cottage has been saved by the community, and is going to be moved into secure storage at the Port of Seattle just a mile south of its 1123 Harbor Ave SW location. This ‘First Mile’ move will be on the evening of Tuesday, Aug. 17, 2021, starting after 11 p.m. and going until approximately 2 a.m. Wednesday, Aug. 18. All are invited to watch the convoy from the Harbor Avenue SW sidewalk.

Leading up to the move, you can participate in the ‘First Mile’ Auction where fans of the Stone Cottage have the opportunity to bid on five separate packages that epitomize moving the Stone Cottage:

Lead the Move — Ride in the Pilot Car

Launch the Convoy — Push The Blast-Off Button

Backseat Driver — Ride in the Moving Rig

Shadow the Convoy — Ride in the Sweeper Car

Wave-in the Convoy — Finish Line Checkered Flag

Prefer something less high profile? Consider a ‘Buy The Mile’ per-foot donation for the haul route.

The Save the Stone Cottage ‘First Mile’ Auction website is open for bids from 10 a.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 10, 2021, through 4 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 14, 2021. Highest bid winners will be notified of their status and specific move details beginning at noon Sunday, Aug. 15, 2021.

Visit The ‘First Mile’ Auction site to bid and start the fun. The ‘First Mile’ Auction site is hosted by the Southwest Seattle Historical Society and we are grateful for its auction expertise.

Save the Stone Cottage LLC has raised more than $82,000 of the $110,000 donation goal to execute a phased plan to rescue, relocate and restore the Stone Cottage. Donations are still being accepted through the website www.savethestonecottage.org and a GoFundMe charity account. The Southwest Seattle Historical Society, a tax exempt 501(c)(3) organization, is serving as the fiscal sponsor of the Save the Stone Cottage Project. We appreciate its steadfast participation.

Special ‘First Mile’ Thanks to the Southwest Seattle Historical Society, Nickel Brothers, Chainqui Development, All City Fence, Bennett Properties, Port of Seattle, Seattle Department of Transportation and Northwest Insurance Group.

It’s been four months since the Stone Cottage was jacked up in preparation for the move. Save the Stone Cottage’s Jeff McCord tells us it’s still in good shape, and that jacking it up early was actually beneficial, protecting it from potential risks such as vandalism. As for why the long delay, he said permits took longer than expected. As for what happens after the move – the next step is to find a permanent new home.

Learn about the Duwamish River @ next Words, Writers, Southwest Stories

It runs along much of West Seattle’s eastern edge, but what do you really know about the Duwamish River? This Thursday night, online, here’s your chance to find out more. The announcement is from the Southwest Seattle Historical Society:

Words, Writers & Southwest Stories, a speaker series of the Southwest Seattle Historical Society, is excited to announce that it is hosting BJ Cummings for a live Zoom presentation on Thursday, August 12 at 6:00 PM. Cummings will deliver a presentation on her book “The River That Made Seattle: A Human and Natural History of the Duwamish.” Registration is required. Please register HERE.

With bountiful salmon and fertile plains, the Duwamish River has drawn people to its shores over the centuries for trading, transport, and sustenance. Chief Si’ahl and his allies fished and lived in villages here and white settlers established their first settlements nearby. Industrialists later straightened the river’s natural turns and built factories on its banks, floating in raw materials and shipping out airplane parts, cement, and steel. Unfortunately, the very utility of the river has been its undoing, as decades of dumping led to the river being declared a Superfund cleanup site.

Using previously unpublished accounts by Indigenous people and settlers, BJ Cummings’s compelling narrative restores the Duwamish River to its central place in Seattle and Pacific Northwest history. Writing from the perspective of environmental justice—and herself a key figure in river restoration efforts—Cummings vividly portrays the people and conflicts that shaped the region’s culture and natural environment. She conducted research with members of the Duwamish Tribe, with whom she has long worked as an advocate. Cummings shares the river’s story as a call for action in aligning decisions about the river and its future with values of collaboration, respect, and justice.

BJ Cummings is the author of “The River That Made Seattle: A Human and Natural History of the Duwamish” (UW Press 2020), winner of the Association of King County Historical Association’s 2021 Virginia Marie Folkins Award for outstanding historical publication. Cummings founded the Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition in 2001, served as the Puget Soundkeeper Alliance’s “Soundkeeper” from 1994–99, and as Sustainable Seattle’s Executive Director from 2016–18. She is currently the Community Engagement Manager for the University of Washington’s EDGE and Superfund Research Programs in the Environmental and Occupational Health Department in the School of Public Health, and is the co-author of several community health studies, including the Duwamish Valley Cumulative Health Impacts Analysis and Duwamish River Superfund Cleanup Plan Health Impact Assessment.

Cummings holds a Masters Degree in Environmental Geography from UCLA, and is the author and producer of numerous articles, books, and documentary films on environment and development issues locally and throughout the Americas, including her 1990 book, “Dam the Rivers, Damn the People: Resistance and Survival in Amazonian Brazil” (Earthscan/WWF UK), and 2000 documentary film “Ecosanctuary Belize” (Outside Television). Her work has been featured in Outside Television’s documentary film, The Waterkeepers and PBS Frontline’s Poisoned Waters, as well as numerous regional news outlets. Over the past two decades, Cummings has been recognized as a National River Network “River Hero,” Sustainable Seattle’s “Sustainability Hero,” King County’s Green Globe winner for Environmental Activism, recipient of Puget Soundkeeper Alliance’s “Inspiration Award,” and one of Seattle Magazine’s “10 most influential leaders.”

This presentation is part of the Humanities Washington Speakers Bureau. The Southwest Seattle Historical Society is grateful to Humanities Washington for their support. This series is open to hosting any author or speaker addressing historical issues relating to the Puget Sound/Duwamish Peninsula and/or the general public. Additional information on future presentations can be obtained by contacting Dora-Faye Hendricks, Chair, ‘Words, Writers & SouthWest Stories’ by phone at 206-290-8315 or by e-mail at Dora-Faye@comcast.net.

SCHOOLS: Roof project finally wrapping up at West Seattle High School, with something extra

Along with saying goodbye to the Class of 2021, West Seattle High School is also saying goodbye to its longrunning roof project. Seattle Public Schools says the two-year project is concluding this month. And it’s more than repair and replacement – it includes a bit of historical restoration too. The photos and explanation are from the district announcement:

As part of the project, the school is once again crowned by a spire atop the main cupola. The historic spire was installed when the school was constructed in 1918 but disappeared sometime after a roof repair project in the 1980s.

The Stemper Architecture website shows how the new spire was designed, made, and installed.

The district replaced part of the clay tile roof on the school’s 1918 wing, an official city landmark, in 2017. That work, the district says, “identified further issues with the landmark clay tile roof and the need to replace the existing thermal polyolefin roofing system as it had reached the end of its service life.” The resulting work also included sections of seam metal roofing over other parts of the school. This photo shows the multiple roofing types:

Plus, the district says, its project “addressed some deficiencies in the school’s design, including leaking concrete masonry walls covered with a new wall panel system, and a leaking seismic expansion joint which was replaced with a waterproof, continuous seismic expansion joint system.” Read more about the work on the SPS website.

Part of Walker Rock Garden site to be redeveloped

Thanks to the neighbors who’ve sent photos, including the one above. Redevelopment has begun on the site that holds part of the Walker Rock Garden, a backyard work of art created more than a half-century ago as a true labor of love (here’s the backstory), east of Fairmount Park.

The original owners are long gone. A decade ago, relatives put the site up for sale, hoping to find a buyer interested in maintaining the rock garden. That time, it didn’t sell. Two years later, they listed it again. No sale that time either. Finally, last fall, the south part of the site was sold to a developer, and a permit was sought for redevelopment with two houses.

When we inquired about the sale and the garden’s status, the family told us, “The Garden, due to time and time’s natural impact on things, has experienced significant deterioration on the rock and structures. Unfortunately, no one was identified who could make the hefty financial and time investments needed to restore and maintain the Garden.” It used to be made available for public visits on Mother’s Day; last one we have record of was in 2014.

The north part of the site still holds the original house, now a rental, and at least some of the rock art. But the Walker Rock Garden’s most-famous feature, the gazebo – seen in the photo above – is on the parcel where the new houses are to be built.

Southwest Seattle Historical Society presents ‘Pressing the System: How Newsprint Won Women the Right to Vote’ online Thursday

May 22, 2021 1:28 pm
|    Comments Off on Southwest Seattle Historical Society presents ‘Pressing the System: How Newsprint Won Women the Right to Vote’ online Thursday
 |   West Seattle history | West Seattle news

(Cartoon image from ‘Votes for Women Volume 1, Issue 11,’ courtesy SWSHS)

Our state was a leader in granting women the right to vote, and the movement’s leaders included Alki’s Katherine Smith. This Thursday at 6 pm, the Southwest Seattle Historical Society explores part of what brought suffragists to victory, with an online presentation and panel discussion (and we’re honored to be part of it). Here’s the announcement of “Pressing the System: How Newsprint Won Women the Right to Vote”:

Join us for a presentation discussing suffragist Katherine Smith’s utilization of newsprint to inform voters, and hear from SWSHS volunteers Bethany Green and Kathy Mulady, as well as Tracy Record from West Seattle Blog in a panel discussion reflecting the power of the press. Registration is required.

Newspapers were instrumental in convincing voters that women deserve the right to vote in Washington state 10 full years before the 19th amendment passed in Congress. This program will dig deeper into that journalistic legacy, and explore how the press protects and promotes the basic rights of the American people today. We’ll discuss how the press shaped the way that the public perceived the suffrage movement in Washington for 50 years while women fought for the right to vote and reflect on that power today.

The program will consist of a 20-minute presentation from the Southwest Seattle Historical Society, followed by a 30-minute panel discussion, and an opportunity for an audience Q&A.

For more details and to register, please visit our website at loghousemuseum.org/blog/may-27-pressing-the-system

Questions? Curator Maggie Kase can answer them – maggiek@loghousemuseum.org.

REOPENING: Log House Museum sets the date

(WSB file photo)

Another long-awaited reopening is on the way. The Southwest Seattle Historical Society has just announced the reopening date for its home base, the Log House Museum on Alki:

Opening Day is on its way! The Southwest Seattle Historical Society is thrilled to announce that our beloved Log House Museum will be reopening to the public on Friday, May 21st 2021 from 12:00 to 4:00 PM.

Want to see our new exhibits before anyone else? Become a member today HERE since the Log House Museum will be open for a members only opening weekend May 14th, 15th, and 16th from 12:00 to 4:00 PM.

From White Center to Delridge, South Park to Alki, we love being stewards of your local history. Visit the museum to explore The Alki Suffrage Club to discover how Alki women were key players in gaining women’s suffrage in 1910, and what the impacts of WWII were on local high schoolers through War on the Homefront.

Our community is full of historic changemakers – so come tell us your stories!

The Southwest Seattle Historical Society is committed to fostering a healthy environment for our entire community. As such, face masks are required for all museum visitors over the age of 2. Visitors can also expect increased ventilation through the museum, frequent cleaning, and capacity limits.

Please check our website often for important updates about how to plan your visit and what you can expect upon your arrival to the museum. For more information you can also call us at 206-350-0999 or email us at museum@loghousemuseum.org. We look forward to welcoming you back.

If you haven’t been to the museum, it’s a cozy, historic building at 61st/Stevens. The SWSHS has been busy with many virtual offerings during the closure – tomorrow night you are invited to view the awards ceremony for its recent youth writing contest!

CELEBRATE: See, hear, and cheer writing-contest winners

May 5, 2021 3:53 pm
|    Comments Off on CELEBRATE: See, hear, and cheer writing-contest winners
 |   West Seattle history | West Seattle news

Last month we published the winning essays in a first-of-its-kind Southwest Seattle Historical Society contest – and this Friday night you can see, hear, and cheer the winners during an online event. Here’s the announcement from SWSHS:

The Southwest Seattle Historical Society is pleased to announce a virtual Award Ceremony honoring the winners of our first annual Youth Writing Contest. Join us for a live Zoom program on Friday, May 7th at 6:00 PM to celebrate our winners Lillian Stowell, Elliott Neves, and Halle Morgan, and hear the authors read their essays. Additionally, we’ll be joined by local authors Mary Fleck, Judy Bentley, and Joey Richesson to speak about the importance of historical writing and young authorship. Congratulations to our winners!

As a reminder, the theme of our competition was: WOMEN HISTORY MAKERS OF THE DUWAMISH PENINSULA. Students explored the contributions of a specific woman from the Duwamish Peninsula who has made an historical impact on the community, past or present, famous or not-yet-famous.

Registration is required. Visit: loghousemuseum.org/blog/1st-annual-youth-writing-contest-award-ceremony to register. Registered participants will be emailed a link to the presentation on the date of the event.

You can read the winning essays here, here, and here.

‘Pandemic People,’ separated by a century: New free ‘digital tour’ offered by Southwest Seattle Historical Society

May 3, 2021 12:52 pm
|    Comments Off on ‘Pandemic People,’ separated by a century: New free ‘digital tour’ offered by Southwest Seattle Historical Society
 |   Coronavirus | West Seattle history | West Seattle news

(WSB file photo)

The Log House Museum hasn’t reopened yet, but its parent organization is offering another “digital tour.” Here’s the announcement:

The Southwest Seattle Historical Society is pleased to announce its second digital tour experience “Pandemic People: Compare and Contrast Lived Experiences in 1918 and 2020.” Join us for an online tour to experience the enrichment that an in-person field trip experience affords, even while we can’t be together. This tour is open for student groups Grades 6 – 12, and any interested adult groups. Signups are required at least two weeks before your desired tour date. “Pandemic People” is a free experience.

“Pandemic People” compares and contrasts pandemic experiences on the Duwamish Peninsula in the age of The Spanish Flu and COVID-19. The tour invites participants to reflect on care discrepancies between communities, public safety precautions, and first-person narratives of life in the pandemic in 1918 and 2020. How have our experiences living in pandemic conditions changed over the past century? How have they stayed the same? Join us on a digital tour to find out! To register, please call 206-350-0999, or email museum@loghousemuseum.org. Tours run for approximately 40 minutes. Tour availability is based on docent availability and is subject to change.

VIDEO: Stone Cottage – up, up, but not yet away

TUESDAY: Thanks to Mike Shaughnessy of Save The Stone Cottage for the photo! As previewed here Sunday night, the structural-moving firm Nickel Bros has been at the historic stone-studded bungalow for two days, jacking it up to get ready to take it to its interim site. The date for the move isn’t set yet – it will have to happen in the middle of the night, since the process tends to involve some road-blocking. Save The Stone Cottage volunteers, meantime, continues crowdfunding for the next phase of saving the quirky piece of Alki Beach housing history – finding a permanent site, relocating it there, and restoring it. (Its current site at 1123 Harbor SW will soon be redeveloped.)

WEDNESDAY MORNING: Mike just sent the link to this video showing how the process proceeded:

FOLLOWUP: Next phase of Stone Cottage moving preps about to start

(January photo by Mark Jaroslaw)

The date for the big move isn’t finalized yet but over the next few days, if you happen to go by 1123 Harbor Avenue SW, you’ll see intensified preparations for getting the historic Stone Cottage on the road to its future. Deb Barker from the volunteer coalition Save The Stone Cottage tells WSB that structural-move specialists Nickel Bros will be back on site starting tomorrow. After some work such as caulking, they’ll be jacking up the stone-studded bungalow to get it on the piers that will support it for the move. As announced three weeks ago, Save The Stone Cottage has raised enough to ensure the move can be made, taking it to an interim site for storage until a permanent location is found. Crowdfunding continues so the Stone Cottage can then be restored.

YOUTH WRITING CONTEST: Southwest Seattle Historical Society’s high-school-student winner

This week we’re publishing the winning entries in the Southwest Seattle Historical Society‘s youth-writing contest, for essays on “Women History Makers of the Duwamish Peninsula.” Tonight, we conclude with the high-school winner:

Bertha Landes
By Halle Morgan

Bertha Ethel Knight Landes was born in 1868. She was born into a world where women couldn’t vote and where there were barely any women in politics. Landes paved the way for many, becoming the first female mayor of a major US city. All her adult life was devoted to making the city of Seattle a better place.

Landes saw the community as an extension of home and was always very active in it. She founded the Women’s City Club and played leadership roles in many organizations including the Women’s University Club, the Woman’s Century Club, the League of Women Voters, the Women’s Auxiliary of University Congregational Church, and was the president of the Washington State League of Women Voters. This leadership led her to be appointed by the mayor to serve on a commission studying unemployment.

In 1922, Landes and Katheryn Miracle were elected to serve on Seattle City Council, becoming the first women to do so. As a city council member, Landes supported city planning and zoning as well as social concerns such as hospitals and recreation programs. In 1924 when Landes was reelected, she became the council president. The mayor at the time, Edwin Brown, left the city to go to the 1924 Democratic National Convention, leaving Bertha as the acting mayor.

In 1926, Edwin Brown ran for reelection and Landes ran against him. Landes ran on a platform that emphasized “municipal housekeeping,” vowing to clean up the city government. Landes won the election by over 6,000 votes and quickly set to work. She continued to work for things she supported when she was on the city council as well as fought against bootleggers and reckless drivers.

Landes fulfilled her promise of cleaning up the government by putting the city’s financial house in order. She also improved public transportation and parks and advocated for municipal ownership of utilities such as Seattle City Light and street railways. One of her great accomplishments as the mayor was building the Civic Auditorium, which was later used for the Opera House at the 1962 World’s Fair.

A bill that Landes signed that personally affected West Seattle was Seattle Ordinance 54627, which authorized a new pump station in West Seattle, and the equipment and personnel needed to maintain it, which was much needed at the time. This measure helped get water to West Seattle residents. Previously, people on the peninsula hadn’t gotten the water they needed. There wasn’t a lot of water in the area, and the lack of water had many unfortunate health effects on people in these neighborhoods. While there was still much to be done to reform and strengthen West Seattle’s water infrastructure issues, Mayor Landes’s initiatives and legislation were able to create real change in the lives of many people living in West Seattle.

In 1928, Landes ran for reelection. Although she was supported by local newspapers and her ratings were high, Landes lost to Frank Edwards. Despite this, Bertha Landes continued being active in the community. She wrote for national newspapers and was chair of the Sewing Room Work for the Women’s Division of the Mayor’s Commission for Improved Employment. She was also the first woman to serve as moderator of Washington’s Conference of Congregational and Christian Churches.

Bertha Landes had an everlasting impact on the city of Seattle; after her time as mayor, she endlessly encouraged other women to get involved in politics. Today Bertha’s work is still in the city – the largest meeting room at the Seattle City Hall is named in her honor. The tunnel-boring machine that was used to create the tunnel in replacement of the Alaskan Way Viaduct was named after her as well. Like how that machine paved its way through the ground, Bertha Landes paved the way for many others. With her accomplishments and encouragement, Landes convinced many women that they too, can make a difference.

“Let us, while never forgetting our womanhood, drop all emphasis on sex, and put it on being public servants.” -Bertha Landes.

If you missed the other winning essays earlier this week, here’s the elementary winner published Monday; here’s the middle-school winner published Tuesday. Congratulations to all three!

(Photo credit: Seattle Municipal Archives)

YOUTH WRITING CONTEST: Southwest Seattle Historical Society’s middle-school-student winner

This week we’re publishing the winning entries in the Southwest Seattle Historical Society‘s youth-writing contest, for essays on “Women History Makers of the Duwamish Peninsula.” Tonight, the middle-school winner:

“We’re Still Here”
By Elliott Neves

Cecile Hansen, chairwoman of the Duwamish Tribal Council and descendant of Chief Si’ahl (also known as Chief Seattle), has made a significant impact on women and the Duwamish Tribe. Over the years she has accomplished many of her goals through hard work and determination, and the positive outcomes have pushed the Duwamish closer to recognition. As a woman in a leadership position who isn’t afraid to fight for what she wants, she is an inspiration to many.

When Cecile was a young woman, she started attending the Duwamish council meetings after hearing about them from her brother. During those meetings Cecile learned about the Treaty of Point Elliott, which was an agreement saying the tribe would get fishing rights on the Duwamish River. Unfortunately, those rights were not being recognized and Cecile had to witness the outcome as her brother got citation after citation for fishing.

One thing that Cecile fought very hard for was getting the Duwamish to be federally recognized. That means they could get benefits like health care, grants, social services, and the rights to their fishing and hunting grounds. If tribes are not recognized it is very hard (if not impossible) to get these rights and was the reason why Cecile’s brother kept getting those fishing citations. On top of the physical benefits, there is also a mental benefit that comes along with being recognized. Everyone wants to feel like they are valued and a part of things. When a whole community is denied that inclusivity it is very disheartening.

In 1975 Cecile Hansen was elected chairwoman of the Duwamish Tribal Council. She led the charge to establish the Duwamish’s first tribal headquarters. This was a big step because it is important in every community to have a place where you know you can get help, and where everyone is working towards the goal of making the group better. A few years later, Cecile took on the role of Protocol officer at the Seattle Burke Museum. This position enabled her to become a liaison to other Northwest tribes. In working towards her goal of gaining recognition, she joined a group of other unrecognized tribes and testified before the U.S Senate Committee on Indian Affairs about the Federal acknowledgment process.

Through thick and thin, Cecile Hansen has been there for the Duwamish Tribe. She has been a role model to women of all ages with her perseverance, and everyone should strive to have her dedication. In addition to all her other accomplishments, she also helped secure enough land to build the Duwamish Longhouse and Cultural center. This center can help members of the tribe feel more connected to their heritage and ancestors. With a memorable motto of “We’re still here,” Cecile works very hard to make those words true for the Duwamish Tribe.

Tomorrow night, we’ll publish the high-school winner’s essay; if you missed it last night, here’s the elementary winner.

YOUTH WRITING CONTEST: Southwest Seattle Historical Society’s elementary-student winner

Back in January, the Southwest Seattle Historical Society started accepting entries for its youth-writing contest, welcoming essays on “Women History Makers of the Duwamish Peninsula.” We promised to publish the winning essays. The SWSHS has chosen its winners, and tonight, here’s the first one, from the 3rd-5th-grade category.

A Hero to Washington
By Lillian Stowell

Katherine Smith was a hero to Washington, but no one made a statue or a mural for her, even though she deserved one.

She was born on February 9, 1868, in Pennsylvania. Then when she married George A. Smith she moved to Colorado. Colorado was the second state that women could vote in. However, she lost her right to vote when she moved to Alki, Washington in 1904.

She started a woman suffrage club that 200 people attended. Women gained the right to vote in Washington in 1910. I chose Katherine because she fought for women suffrage fairly. She did not riot, instead she convinced officials to let women vote by talking to them. I think women’s voting is important because women might have different opinions then men. For example, if there was a president that didn’t treat women respectfully then women couldn’t vote for someone\ else.

Without women like Katherine who fought for women suffrage, we might not have Vice President Kamala Harris today.

Lillian is a student at West Seattle Elementary. The SWSHS contest had middle- and high-school winners, too, and we’ll publish those winning essays over the next two nights.

Photo of Katherine Smith from the Seattle Star, February 1911