West Seattle history 709 results

LAST CALL: One more day to register for Bridging Our Communities Together!

May 22, 2022 1:20 pm
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 |   Fun stuff to do | How to help | West Seattle history | West Seattle news

Help buy a new roof for the Log House Museum! That’s part of what the Southwest Seattle Historical Society is raising money for by presenting its Bridging Our Communities Together celebration on June 3rd. Tomorrow (Monday, May 23rd) is the deadline to register, according to this update from the SWSHS:

We look forward to seeing you on June 3rd for Bridging Our Communities Together: Celebrating 25 Years of the Log House Museum. We’ll host an evening reception, silent auction, and hear from a panel of some of our founders as we raise a toast to our past and craft a vision of our future together. Registration closes on May 23rd, so purchase tickets now if you have not already!

Your ticket will help put a new roof on the beloved Log House Museum, fuel a brand-new lecture series, and support our work preserving the stories of the Duwamish Peninsula.

Bidding on auction items opens on May 30 and closes on June 3. More of our 20+ auction items are posted every week!

Register HERE today and be sure to follow the instructions below:

*If you registered for last year’s auction you can utilize the same login information to register for the event.

*Remember to register for the auction after purchasing your ticket.

*If you are registering for the first time, click on “Create Account” at the top of the page to register for your Personal Link which will allow you to bid on auction items. You will need to set up a login which you can use to access the auction items.

The June 3rd event is happening at Salty’s on Alki (1936 Harbor SW; WSB sponsor).

LAST CALL: Early registration ends today for Southwest Seattle Historical Society celebration

May 12, 2022 9:50 am
|    Comments Off on LAST CALL: Early registration ends today for Southwest Seattle Historical Society celebration
 |   How to help | West Seattle history | West Seattle news

Got your ticket(s) yet? Today is your last chance for early-registration pricing to attend the Southwest Seattle Historical Society‘s “Bridging Our Communities Together” celebration on June 3rd – here’s the reminder:

Early Registration for Bridging Our Communities Together closes May 12th. Hurry and get your tickets today to join us for an in-person celebration of 25 years of the Log House Museum at Salty’s on Alki on June 3rd, 2022.

Join us for an evening reception, silent auction, and a chance to see three brand new exhibits exploring the history of West Seattle, White Center, and South Park. We’ll raise a toast to our past and craft a vision of our future together!

Through the last two years, we have focused on collecting and sharing the individual stories of our history through email, through our website, and through Zoom. Now, we are so excited to welcome you back to the Log House Museum and explore our collective history and connections in person.

Bidding on auction items opens on May 31 and closes on June 3. More of our 20+ auction items posted every week!

Register HERE today and be sure to follow the instructions below. Register today and save!

If you registered for last year’s auction you can utilize the same login information to register for the event.

Remember to register for the auction after purchasing your ticket.

If you are registering for the first time click on “Create Account” at the top of the page to register for your Personal Link which will allow you to bid on auction items. You will need to set up a login which you can use to access the auction items.

We look forward to seeing you on June 3rd!

NEW LEADERSHIP: Maggie Kase becomes executive director of Southwest Seattle Historical Society

May 3, 2022 5:34 pm
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 |   West Seattle history | West Seattle news | West Seattle people

More leadership news today – this time, from the Southwest Seattle Historical Society:

The SWSHS Board of Trustees is happy to announce that Maggie Kase has been appointed Executive Director of the historical society. After nearly two years as Curator, Maggie had been serving as Interim Executive Director since the resignation of former ED Michael King.

As a result of a nation-wide search, the Board felt that Maggie’s experience in senior leadership, in curatorial and interpretive work and in her commitment to local history best suits the society’s goal to embrace and preserve the history and stories of all the residents of the Duwamish peninsula, both past and present.

Maggie is the key programmatic lead for the society’s highly acclaimed current exhibit “The Spirit Returns 2.0: A Duwamish and Settler Story” in partnership with the Duwamish Longhouse and Cultural Center.

The society is also please to announce the election of two new trustees: Carol-Ann Thornton and Megan Simkus. Carol-Ann has been a member of the society’s Advisory Council and played an important role in the history of West Seattle, having been the first African American student at Alki Elementary School. Megan, an Amazon executive, brings valuable strategic planning skills to the board through her business and non-profit experience.

SWSHS is headquartered in the city-landmark Log House Museum at 61st/Stevens. The museum’s 25th anniversary will be celebrated at the SWSHS “Bridging Our Communities” event June 3.

YOU’RE INVITED! Registration time for Southwest Seattle Historical Society celebration

April 23, 2022 2:13 pm
|    Comments Off on YOU’RE INVITED! Registration time for Southwest Seattle Historical Society celebration
 |   How to help | West Seattle history | West Seattle news

Big birthday for the home of West Seattle’s history – 25 years for the Southwest Seattle Historical Society‘s Log House Museum. Registration is now open for the celebration that’s coming up at 6 pm Friday, June 3rd – here’s the announcement:

Register today for Bridging Our Communities Together: Celebrating 25 Years of the Log House Museum at Salty’s on Alki. We can’t wait to see you in person and celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Log House Museum. Join us for an evening reception, silent auction, and a chance to see three brand new exhibits exploring the history of West Seattle, White Center, and South Park.

Through the last two years, we have focused on collecting and sharing the individual stories of our history through email, through our website, and through Zoom. Now, we are so excited to welcome you back to the Log House Museum and explore our collective history and connections in person. Your support will help us create new programming for schools and families, create bigger, better, and more exciting exhibits than ever before, collect and preserve your stories, and so much more.

Bidding on auction items opens on May 31 and closes on June 3.

Register HERE today and be sure to follow the instructions below. Register today and save – early bird registration closes May 12!

If you registered for last year’s auction, you can utilize the same login information.

If you are registering for the first time click on “Create Account” at the top of the page to register for your Personal Link, which will allow you to bid on auction items. You will need to set up a login which you can use to access the auction items.

The Log House Museum is open again for drop-in visits, noon-4 pm Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays, at 61st/Stevens.

Next step on Alki Elementary’s road to rebuilding: Landmarks Board consideration

As Alki Elementary proceeds toward its levy-funded rebuild, it will go before the city Landmarks Board for consideration. Landmark nomination is a standard step in the process when a big Seattle Public Schools project like this is planned – we’ve reported on several prior instances, going back to the Denny/Sealth project in 2008, also including Fairmount Park Elementary, the former Genesee Hill Elementary , and the old Arbor Heights Elementary, all in 2013, among others. Though it’s largely a technicality, the full nomination process has to play out, so the board will have a hearing during its next online meeting at 3:30 pm Wednesday, April 20th, as previewed here. Meantime, the $66 million rebuild is expected to start construction after next school year; for the ’23-’24 and ’24-’25 school years, Alki will hold classes at the former Schmitz Park Elementary (currently temporary home to West Seattle Elementary during its addition project).

P.S. West Seattle has four schools that are fully designated as city landmarks – E.C. Hughes (Roxhill) Elementary, Gatewood Elementary, Madison Middle School, and West Seattle High School – here’s the map showing all city landmarks.

REOPENING: Southwest Seattle Historical Society’s Log House Museum

April 5, 2022 6:03 pm
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 |   West Seattle history | West Seattle news

(Southwest Seattle Historical Society photo)

The home of West Seattle’s history, the Log House Museum at 61st/Stevens, is about to reopen its doors to the public after its latest pandemic-precautionary closure. The Southwest Seattle Historical Society’s interim director Maggie Kase sent the announcement:

We are very excited to announce that the Southwest Seattle Historical Society’s Log House Museum will be re-opening to the public Friday, April 8th, 2022. Our hours of operation are 12:00 to 4:00 pm Friday-Saturday. Face coverings are still required in the Log House Museum for all visitors age 5 and older regardless of vaccination status. No appointment required, walk-ins welcome. We look forward to seeing you soon!

Information on visiting the museum is here.

P.S. You can learn more about the SWSHS in the latest episode of Keith Bacon‘s podcast All Ways West Seattle.

WEST SEATTLE HISTORY: What’s next for the rescued Stone Cottage?

(WSB photos by Patrick Sand)

By Tracy Record
West Seattle Blog editor

For the first time since its move from a redevelopment site, the Stone Cottage welcomed a crowd of visitors this morning. Historic Seattle is hosting events that spotlight recipients of its Preservation Awards, and the volunteer group that rescued the stone-studded beach bungalow is among them. So this morning – seven months after the specialty moving firm Nickel Bros towed it off its original site – more than three dozen people gathered at the Port of Seattle lot where the century-old house, up on blocks and behind fencing, awaits its future.

Three West Seattleites from Save The Stone Cottage LLC told its story. Entrepreneur John Bennett recapped its history, from how its quirky owner Eva Falk decided to cover it in rocks, to how local advocates first tried to buy it 20 years ago to the recent rescue operation.

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REAL ESTATE: West Seattle Junction’s city-landmark Campbell Building up for sale

campbellbuildingphotofromnom(Undated photo from landmark-nomination document)

Five years after local preservation advocates got two buildings in the heart of the West Seattle Junction designated as city landmarks, one of them is up for sale – the Campbell Building on the northeast corner of California/Alaska. A check of commercial real-estate listings shows the century-old brick-clad building went on the market Thursday for an asking price of $6 million. It’s a mixed-use building, with apartments and offices over business spaces, including the three currently occupied by Cupcake Royale, City Mouse, and Shanghai Hair Studio. Landmark designation does not necessarily guarantee preservation of a building; the listing for this one notes, “NC3P-95 Zoning allows a significant development opportunity for one of the most important corners in the Junction.” By vote of the city Landmarks Board in April 2017, the exterior of the building was declared a landmark, but not the interior; elsewhere in the city – Capitol Hill, for example – redevelopment projects have preserved historic facades at the bottom of new buildings. As reported in our 2017 coverage of the Campbell Building designation, the building’s been owned by the same family for almost 80 years, and they did not object to the designation. (Here’s the city document on the building’s landmark status.)

Southwest Seattle Historical Society looking for a new executive director

March 8, 2022 8:55 pm
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 |   West Seattle history | West Seattle news

(WSB file photo)

The landmark Log House Museum on Alki is home to the Southwest Seattle Historical Society, which is looking for new staff leadership:

The Southwest Seattle Historical Society has begun a search for a new Executive Director who will be responsible for the day-to-day management of the society, including the Log House Museum, focusing on its fundraising, community outreach, administration, and financial management.

The society’s mission is to preserve and promote local history through education, preservation, and advocacy. Per our mission, and because we are committed to welcoming and affirming a diverse community, it is our priority to incorporate Diversity, Equity, Acessibility and Inclusion (DEAI) into every area of our operations, exhibits, and programming.

We would like candidates to have knowledge and appreciation for the history of the Duwamish Peninsula and to understand the role the society plays in the community – to help us be aware of, understand, and appreciate the stories and contributions of each neighborhood, from Alki to the Alaska Junction to White Center and South Park.

We are grateful to our previous Executive Director, Michael King, who navigated our organization through the pandemic, ably pivoting our programs from in person to online, at the same time building more robust and diverse offerings. We congratulate him on his new opportunity with the Washington State Historical Society.

Preference will be given to applications received before April 8, 2022.

For the full job description and how to apply, go here.

BOOKS: Long before streaming, there was the Shyvers Multiphone. Here’s your chance to hear from someone who wrote the book on it

Thursday night is the next Words, Writers, Southwest Stories presentation from the Southwest Seattle Historical Society – this time, an online conversation involving two well-known West Seattleites:

The Southwest Seattle Historical Society is excited to announce that it is hosting John Bennett and Clay Eals in conversation for a live Zoom presentation on Thursday, March 10 at 6:00 PM.

John Bennett, author of “The Shyvers Multiphone Story” and a longtime sponsor and board member of the historical society, will be interviewed by Clay Eals, a founding member and former executive director of the historical society. Registration is required. Register here.

Bennett’s 152-page, large-format book, illustrated with hundreds of photos and news and magazine clippings, recounts the fascinating history of a little-known precursor to the jukebox. First called the Shyvers Music Phone and later the Shyvers Multiphone, this Seattle-based invention was placed in restaurants and bars. It allowed a patron to drop a nickel into a slot and select a song to be heard on a speaker as transmitted by phone lines from a 78rpm record that was played by a “hostess” at a centralized, remote location.

The Shyvers Music Phones and Multiphones were popular in the 1940s and 1950s, and they were showcased in the 1949 Doris Day film “My Dream Is Yours.” Their demise followed a music-industry transition to 45rpm records and high-quality jukeboxes. Today, Shyvers Music Phones and Mulitphones are treasured collectibles. Bennett, who operated a jukebox repair and sale business called Jukebox City in Seattle in the 1980s, parlayed his interest in coin-operated music devices and passion for historic preservation into publishing this handsome and evocative book, released in fall 2021. Providing key editing and design assistance was John’s sister, Jane Bennett. The book is for sale via eBay.

You might also know John Bennett for his West Seattle restaurant Luna Park Café as well as his preservationist activities such as participating in saving the Stone Cottage. Eals is a longtime journalist and author whose work includes the well-regarded biography “Steve Goodman: Facing the Music,” now in its sixth printing.

STONE COTTAGE: Visit its temporary site with Historic Seattle next month

(August 18, 2021, reader photo by Rachel)

Heard about this last night at the Alki Community Council meeting and confirmed it today with Historic Seattle: The preservationist group is presenting a visit to the temporary site of the historic Stone Cottage on March 12th, with tickets available now. It’s the first chance for an update since the quirky structure’s move exactly half a year ago. Participants will include some of the local volunteers/advocates who worked for years to save it from facing demolition when its Harbor Avenue site was sold for redevelopment. The event is in-person, in West Seattle, at 11 am Saturday, March 12th, with a small ticket fee that supports Historic Seattle.

Carol-Ann Thornton returns to ‘Words, Writers, & Southwest Stories’

January 30, 2022 9:45 pm
|    Comments Off on Carol-Ann Thornton returns to ‘Words, Writers, & Southwest Stories’
 |   West Seattle history | West Seattle news

60 years ago, in West Seattle, Carol-Ann Thornton made history in her childhood. It’s history from which many lessons remain to be learned. She is returning to the Southwest Seattle Historical Society‘s speaker series in a week and a half to share her insights. Here’s the announcement:

‘Words, Writers, & Southwest Stories,’ a speaker series of the Southwest Seattle Historical Society, is excited to announce that it is hosting Carol-Ann Thornton for a live Zoom presentation on Thursday, February 10 at 6:00 PM. Carol-Ann will deliver a presentation titled “Privilege and Entitlement Versus Healing and Restoration?: Exploring a Slice of West Seattle History and Beyond.” Free registration is required. Visit our website to register.

Carol-Ann is returning for her second presentation with Words, Writers, and Southwest Stories. This time, she will explore themes of acknowledging barriers and challenges past and present within the history of the West Seattle community and beyond and exploring tools and options that facilitate forgiveness, healing, restoration, acceptance, and love of one another.

Carol-Ann Sharp Thornton is the first child of color in 1962 to enter the Seattle Public Schools’ newly implemented Volunteer Transfer Program from an inner-city school to integrate a segregated school in the Alki, Admiral, and Beach Drive communities of West Seattle. She has been honored with invitations to share her life experiences as a child raised through the civil-rights era with various groups and organizations.

Carol-Ann continues to embrace her career of 29 years as a counselor and legal advocate supporting those suffering from abuse and victimization through domestic violence and sexual abuse. As a nationally licensed Evangelist Missionary, she has been able to carry her passion for education, empowerment and outreach into the faith communities regarding abuse issues. As an educator, Carol-Ann conducts frequent trainings on domestic violence and victimization to community agencies and organizations, Carol-Ann has earned a Bachelor of Arts in Human and Social Services and a Master of Christian Counseling, as well as national certifications as a Domestic Violence Counselor, Criminal Justice Specialist, Christian Counselor and a Tribal Court Legal Advocate/Attorney. She is currently pursuing her Juris Doctorate Executive Track as a first-year Law School student. Carol-Ann is a member of the Criminal Justice Advisory Board at Pierce College, and an Advisory Council member of the Southwest Seattle Historical Society.

To see Carol-Ann Thornton’s previous Words, Writers, and Southwest Stories presentation “Culture Shock: The Awakening of Alki and West Seattle in 1962 and Beyond,” watch this video:

Free registration is required for the February 10th presentation. Registered participants will be emailed a link to the presentation the week of the event.

2021 LOOKBACK: This year’s 10 most-commented WSB stories

At WSB, we have just one “year in review” tradition – listing the 10 stories that drew the most comments. (That doesn’t mean they were the most-read stories – since we publish in blog format, and it’s possible to read multiple stories by scrolling down the home page without multiple clicks, it’s impossible to break out exactly how many times an individual story’s been seen.) With hours to go in 2021, here goes the countdown:

#10 – PCC ARGUES AGAINST CITY-MANDATED ‘HAZARD PAY’
January 29, 2021 – 142 comments
Less than a week before workers for large grocery companies were set to start receiving $4/hour city-mandated “hazard pay,” PCC‘s then-new CEO Suzy Monford sent city leaders a letter arguing against it. One PCC worker told us it left them and their colleagues feeling “betrayed and belittled.” The company changed its mind shortly thereafter; six months later, Monford left the job she’d had less than a year. PCC has not yet announced a new CEO.

#9 – POWER OUTAGE FOR ALMOST 10,000 CUSTOMERS
December 2, 2021 – 149 comments
This was not only a very large outage, the Seattle City Light map was slow to show it, so more “we’re out in (neighborhood)” comments amassed in the early going.

#8 – CITY-BACKED $14 MILLION OFFER FOR JUNCTION PARKING LOTS
April 30, 2021 – 155 comments
The land that holds the four West Seattle Junction Association-leased parking lots is zoned for tall, dense development. Community Roots Housing offered to buy it. The lots’ owners, Trusteed Properties, have not publicly announced a decision,

#7 – DISTRICT SUDDENLY ADDS A DAY OFF
November 9, 2021 – 165 comments
Seattle Public Schools startled families two days before Veterans Day by announcing that schools would also be closed the day after the holiday, saying too many employees were taking that day off.

#6 – KING COUNTY’S VACCINE-VERIFICATION PLAN
September 16, 2021 – 173 comments
King County announced where, and when, you would soon have to show proof of COVID-19 vaccination (or negative test results).

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HOLIDAY SCHEDULE: Log House Museum’s plan

December 21, 2021 1:56 pm
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 |   Holidays | West Seattle history | West Seattle news

The home of West Seattle’s history is closed until the new year. Here’s the announcement from the Southwest Seattle Historical Society‘s Log House Museum:

The Log House Museum will be closed through January 2nd, 2022 for the holiday season. We will reopen Friday, January 7th during our normal operating hours: Friday-Sunday from 12:00 to 4:00 pm. We look forward to seeing you in the new year!

The museum at 61st and Stevens on Alki is no longer “by appointment only,” so once it reopens, you can just drop in during the aforementioned hours.

THURSDAY: Dr. Julie Pham talks about Vietnam War ‘Hidden Histories’@ Words, Writers, Southwest Stories

What you probably don’t know about the Vietnam War, you can learn Thursday with the Southwest Seattle Historical Society‘s next online presentation. If you haven’t already seen it in the WSB West Seattle Event Calendar, here’s the announcement:

Words, Writers & Southwest Stories,’ a speaker series of the Southwest Seattle Historical Society, is excited to announce that it is hosting Dr. Julie Pham for a live Zoom presentation on Thursday, December 9 at 6:00 PM. Pham will deliver a presentation titled “Hidden Histories: The South Vietnamese Side of the Vietnam War.” Registration is required. Please register HERE.

The Vietnam War is seen by much of the Western world as being fought between the Americans and North Vietnamese Communists, with the South Vietnamese largely absent. Yet many Vietnamese refugees who came to America after the war served in the South Vietnamese military, and there is little recognition and understanding of their contributions and role in the war. In fact, in American and Vietnamese Communist histories, the South Vietnamese are painted as corrupt, apathetic sidekicks to the Americans.

How did the South Vietnamese military really experience the Vietnam War? Historian Julie Pham draws from interviews she conducted with 40 South Vietnamese military veterans in the United States, and illuminates how people can remember historical events differently.

Julie Pham (she/her) is the CEO of CuriosityBased, a consulting practice focused on fostering curiosity in the workplace. Her family owns Northwest Vietnamese News. She published “Their War: The Perspectives of the South Vietnamese Military in the Words of Veteran-Emigres“ in 2019. She earned her Ph.D. in history from the University of Cambridge as a Gates Cambridge Scholar. Pham lives in Seattle.

The ‘Words, Writers, and Southwest Stories’ speaker series is a program of the Southwest Seattle Historical Society in partnership with Seattle Public Library. This presentation is part of the Humanities Washington Speakers Bureau The Historical Society is grateful to Humanities Washington for their support.

KENYON HALL: The shows must go on

By Tracy Record
West Seattle Blog editor

Seven months after its longtime manager’s untimely death, Kenyon Hall is coming back to life.

Lou Magor‘s sudden passing in April came one year into a time that already was uncertain and unnerving for everyone involved in the arts. And then, while mourning its charismatic frontman, Kenyon Hall’s fans found themselves wondering about the future of the historic venue.

But now, Kenyon Hall is hosting shows again – from recorded, streamed performances like last weekend’s concert by Casey MacGill, to Twelfth Night Productions‘ upcoming in-person holiday play, opening soon. The board of its parent nonprofit Seattle Artists has “stepped in to actively do work that needs to be done,” explained longtime board member Connie Corrick, in a conversation with us at the hall (7904 35th SW).

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WEST SEATTLE HISTORY: Log House Museum’s Thanksgiving-weekend closure, and a change after that

November 20, 2021 4:00 pm
|    Comments Off on WEST SEATTLE HISTORY: Log House Museum’s Thanksgiving-weekend closure, and a change after that
 |   West Seattle history | West Seattle news

(Photo courtesy Southwest Seattle Historical Society)

If you want to just stop by the Log House Museum unannounced during its operating hours, tomorrow is your last chance for a while. Here’s the announcement from the Southwest Seattle Historical Society:

The Log House Museum will be CLOSED November 26th, 27th, and 28th for the Thanksgiving holiday. We will be reopening Friday, December 3rd by appointment only for the month of December.

Appointments to visit the Log House Museum are available from 12:00 PM to 4:00 PM Friday-Sunday starting December 3rd, 2021. To make an appointment please email museum@loghousemusem.org by Wednesday of the weekend you would like to visit with:

-Your name
-The date of your appointment
-Your time of arrival
-The number of guests in your party

You will receive an appointment confirmation within 24 hours of your request.

Please note: SWSHS requires proof of vaccination (or a negative test within 72 hours) for all visitors to the Log House Museum who are 12 years and older. This requirement is in compliance with King County’s mandate. Face coverings are still required in the Log House Museum for all visitors age 5 and older regardless of vaccination status.

The museum is at 61st/Stevens.

Southwest Seattle Historical Society invites you to online Friendship Auction

You can help West Seattle’s past continue being stewarded into the future by supporting the Southwest Seattle Historical Society‘s annual fundraiser. Here’s the announcement:

The Southwest Seattle Historical Society is pleased to announce that this year our annual fundraising auction will be held as a silent auction online from Tuesday, November 2, through Friday, November 5. We will miss seeing you at Salty’s on Alki for the second straight year, but hope that you’ll support the Historical Society’s efforts to be present and engaged as a friend to the community.

We’ve been through a lot together over the last year as friends and neighbors on the Duwamish Peninsula. And what we’ve learned as we’ve leaned on each other is how important it is to create and honor meaningful connections, through our unique stories and our shared history. With that in mind, your support will help us realize our goals of increasing our programming for youth and schools, broadening the range of subjects explored in our exhibits and adult programs, collecting more of your stories to preserve for posterity, and so much more.

Please check the Historical Society’s website HERE for updates, including instructions on how to register for bidding. Bidding opens on November 2!

You can follow that same link for early “Raise the Paddle” donations, which are being accepted now. You can also support SWSHS by visiting the Log House Museum, open noon-4 Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays at 61st/Stevens.

20 years after 9/11: Seattle firefighters honor their fallen colleagues

Those on duty at Seattle’s 33 fire stations took a moment at 8:46 am to pause and remember the 343 firefighters who lost their lives because of the 9/11 attacks. We were at Station 32 in The Junction for the brief remembrance.

The list of names was divided between the stations to be read aloud during the ceremony. Here are the names read at Station 32:

Benjamin Suarez
Daniel Suhr
Lt, Christopher Sullivan
Brian Edward Sweeney
Sean Tallon
Allan Tarasiewicz
Brian Tegtmeier
John Tiemey
John Tipping II
Hector Tirado
Richard Vanhine

City leaders are holding a remembrance ceremony right now (we’ll link the recording when it’s available).

20 years after 9/11: At Alki Statue of Liberty

Thanks to Allen for the photos. Along with flowers, someone has left a pictorial memorial at the Alki Statue of Liberty, which became a Seattle gathering place after the 9/11 attacks,

While hundreds gathered there for a 10th-anniversary vigil in 2011, nothing formal is planned today/tonight.

SIDE NOTE: On 9/11/2007, the refurbished statue was unveiled. The plaza surrounding it, with a new pedestal for the statue, was dedicated a year later.

20 years after 9/11: Southwest Seattle Historical Society wants to hear from you

(SWSHS photo: Memory album and luminaria bags from 2001)

Tomorrow marks 20 years since the 9/11 attacks. While no major commemorations are planned in West Seattle, the Southwest Seattle Historical Society is looking for your reflections:

This weekend, the Southwest Seattle Historical Society invites you to reflect on the events of September 11, 2001. Although two decades have passed in the blink of an eye, memories remain fresh in our minds about the heroism, terror, unity, and change generated that day. As a community and nation, we have pledged to never forget the tragedy that unfolded and the Southwest Seattle Historical Society invites you to remember and reflect.

We are collecting diary entries to document your reflections, experiences, and thoughts. Where were you on September 11, 2001? What do you remember about that day? Have your thoughts about September 11, 2001 changed in the twenty years that have passed? How have the events of September 11, 2001 shaped your life and that of your community?

Please share your reflections with us. To do so, please visit: loghousemuseum.org/blog/remembering-september-11-2001

Ten years ago, on the 10th anniversary, hundreds gathered for a vigil at the Alki Statue of Liberty, which became a gathering place for mourners in 2001.

UPDATE: Alki Point Lighthouse opening for first tours since pre-pandemic

(2015 photo by Long Bach Nguyen)

3:46 PM: Just in from Debra Alderman of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary:

We are offering timed tickets for groups of friends or family members (up to 10 people per group) for Alki Point Lighthouse guided tours on the afternoons of September 19 and 26th. The 30-minute timeslots on the 19th may already be booked up but there’s still availability on the 26th. Reservations for the free tours are available on this site while supplies last: calendly.com/cgauxiliaryseattle/30min

If we have any no shows or unclaimed time slots, we’ll allow walkups to fill them. Masks will be required.

The lighthouse is where Beach Drive SW and Alki Avenue SW meet.

6:20 PM: The reservations are all taken but here’s an update from Debra: “If you would like to be added to the wait list/standby list for a tour on one of these weekends or in the future, please email: alkilighthouse@cgauxseattle.org

Registration open for bicycle tour of West Seattle’s musical history

Just announced: A limited-participation ride that’ll take you on a tour of local musical history:

The Southwest Seattle Historical Society is delighted to announce the return of Cycle History in partnership with West Seattle Bike Connections for the fifth year in a row. Cycle History, Sound Spots is happening Saturday, September 18 2021! Please plan to arrive at 9:15 am and be ready to ride at 9:30. Registration is required to participate in this ride. This program is limited to 25 participants.

Join us for an in-person ride through West Seattle’s Admiral District starting and ending at Hiawatha Playfield and Community Center. This year, we’ll be exploring highlights of West Seattle’s musical history. From jazz to grunge, we’ll have stops to please music lovers, bike enthusiasts, and everyone in between!

Seattle is famous for its grunge scene, but our music history goes far and wide. Some of the best hits were created right in West Seattle! We’ll explore locations where music was made, where historic artists performed, and talk about the local and national impact of West Seattle on music history.

To register, please visit loghousemuseum.org/exhibits/cycle-history-sound-spots-bike-dont-run/. For more information, please contact Maggie Kase, Curator, at maggiek@loghousemuseum.org.