West Seattle beaches 433 results

California sea lion carcass removed from West Seattle beach

After about a week, a dead California sea lion that had been on the beach at Jack Block Park is gone. David Hutchinson of Seal Sitters Marine Mammal Stranding Network shares the photo and explains its disposition:

Friday, a team from the Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife (Marine Mammal Investigations) and SR3 (Sealife Response, Rehabilitation & Research), in cooperation with the Port of Seattle, removed an 8-foot long California sea lion carcass from the public beach at Jack Block Park. Seal Sitters coordinated this response, monitoring the carcass’s condition and location until a permit to tow and sink could be obtained through NOAA from the Environmental Protection Agency. Before removal, a necropsy was performed and samples were taken for further analysis. The remains were then towed and sunk at the designated location.

Seal Sitters is a member of NOAA’s West Coast Marine Mammal Stranding Network. We respond to reports of live or dead marine mammals on the beaches of West Seattle from Brace point through the Duwamish River including Harbor Island. If you spot a marine mammal on our local beaches, please call Seal Sitters’ Hotline at 206-905-7325.

Banners up, asking that you ‘Share The Shore’

The photo and announcement are from Seal Sitters Marine Mammal Stranding Network, sent by Lynn Shimamoto:

Seal Sitters’ “Share the Shore” banners are once again hanging along Alki Avenue. The banners were designed several years ago as a Seal Sitters outreach project with the help of a city grant. They are to remind everyone that this is the start of pupping season, when newly weaned harbor seal pups show up on West Seattle beaches. Indeed, we anticipate “Jam,” the still-nursing pup who has been frequently seen with mom ”Pearl,” will soon be weaned and vulnerable as he/she tries to rest and warm up on the beach. Please, if you see a seal: stay back, keep dogs off the beach, and call Seal Sitters at 206-905-SEAL (206-905-7325).

Seal Sitters is part of NOAA’s West Coast Marine Mammal Stranding Network. We respond to marine mammals dead or alive in West Seattle from Brace Point to the Duwamish River, including Harbor Island.

Pearl & Jam appear on West Seattle shore as Seal Sitters Marine Mammal Stranding Network recruits for final 2018 training

Meet Pearl and Jam. David Hutchinson – who photographed them Sunday – reports that Jam was Seal Sitters Marine Mammal Stranding Network‘s “first new harbor seal pup of the 2018 season,” resting with mom Pearl “on a rock just offshore from one of our local beaches. … If you see them at any of our West Seattle beaches, please keep back, keep people and pets away, and call the Seal Sitters’ Hotline at 206-905-SEAL (7325).” Meantime, he shared this announcement:

SEAL SITTERS’ LAST TRAINING OF THE YEAR – AUGUST 25TH

Seal Sitters is a member of NOAA’s West Coast Marine Mammal Stranding Network. We are responsible for responding to any marine mammal on West Seattle beaches from Brace Point through the Duwamish River including Harbor Island.

All new volunteers are required to take a 2-hour training session. Our last training of 2018 will be held in the front meeting room at the Alki UCC, 6115 SW Hinds (MAP), on Saturday, August 25th from 10 AM – Noon. This will be followed by a short Q&A opportunity. Topics covered will include: The Marine Mammal Protection Act, life in a harbor seal rookery, what is Seal Sitters’ role in NOAA’s network, information on the most common marine mammals in our local waters, your role as a volunteer in a challenging urban environment. Also discussed will be volunteer opportunities as a hotline operator, first responder, and scheduler.

IF YOU DON’T LIVE IN WEST SEATTLE – While all the different groups operating in Puget Sound are part of NOAA’s Network, each group functions separately and provides its own training. Our training would only qualify you to volunteer within the area mentioned above.

If you plan on attending, an RSVP is required. Please include in your email the full names of everyone who will be attending. If any of these are minors, include their ages. A parent or guardian must accompany all minors to the training and when they are on the beach. Seating is limited, so be sure to register early to reserve your place.

To RSVP: SealSitters.Outreach@msn.com

SPF30 updates: Setup begins; a vendor you’ll recognize; the guitar you can bid on now; streaming plans…

With three days until Saturday’s SPF30Sub Pop Records‘ concert-filled 30th anniversary celebration at Alki Beach – we have four more updates:

SETUP BEGINS: Thanks to David Hutchinson for the photos showing stage setup today on both sides of the Alki Bathhouse. Above, west of the Bathhouse, is the Loser Stage; below, to the east, the Flippity-Flop Stage:

(Photo courtesy C & P Coffee Company)

Who’s playing when/where was announced two weeks ago; you can find it all fast on the right side of the main SPF30 webpage.

A VENDOR FIRST: The other two stages are Harsh Realm, at 57th/Alki, and Punky, at Whale Tail Park, where you’ll not only find kid-geared music but also this familiar vendor:

C & P Coffee Company (WSB sponsor) says this will be its first time with a pop-up outside the shop! They’ll be selling cold-brew coffee on Saturday. And another familiar West Seattle company will be nearby – Husky Deli. (We hope to have a full list of vendors for an upcoming update.)

FUNDRAISING GUITAR: Bidding is open online for this one-of-a-kind handmade guitar produced in commemoration of Sub Pop turning 30:

We got a look at it while covering the SPF30 volunteer orientation earlier this week. You can see it on display all week at Thunder Road Guitars (4736 California SW; WSB sponsor) in The Junction. It’s a fundraiser for the Southwest Seattle Historical Society, a beneficiary of SPF30. To bid on it – and to find out more about it – go here.

STREAMING: Can’t (or don’t want to) go on Saturday, but want to catch some of the shows? KEXP has announced a video-streaming schedule, with viewing options including its website and YouTube channel. Go here to see which bands it’s streaming and when.

P.S. In case you missed it – here’s the SPF30 transportation plan (including road closures, parking for motorized and non-motorized vehicles, transit, etc.) as announced Tuesday.

UPDATE: Tribal Journey 2018 canoes arrive at Alki Beach

1:47 PM: If you’ve seen the Tribal Journeys canoe arrivals at Alki Beach in years past … this year is bigger than ever. As we’ve been previewing, the arrivals started early this afternoon and are continuing as canoe families arrive from last night’s stop across Puget Sound in Suquamish.

More than 100 canoes were registered to participate this year, and they have supporters here too. There’s even an announcer with a PA system, something we don’t recall seeing/hearing in recent years. And we lost count at more than a dozen charter buses parked along Alki Avenue; the paddlers and their support crews will be transported to Auburn, where the Muckleshoot Tribe will host them tonight. (Muckleshoot security remains at Alki to watch over the canoes.)

We’ll be checking later on the expected morning departure time, for those who would like to come observe then.

More photos/updates to come!

2:47 PM: We just walked to the east end of where the canoes are lined up on the sand – they stretch almost to 58th SW – and counted more than 50. None on the horizon so we don’t know how many are yet to arrive. With each arrival so far, an announcement has been read over the loudspeakers, in Native language as well as English, with the declaration of the tribe’s name, where they’ve come from – some have been journeying for two weeks! – and greetings to the Muckleshoot, as well as a request for permission to come ashore.

Also, a military cargo jet seen flying over West Seattle earlier – low enough to startle people – has just done a flyby over the beach here.

5:13 PM: Went back to Alki to check; the arrivals have concluded.

Security says departures are expected between 7 and 9 tomorrow morning.

ADDED EARLY FRIDAY: Alki photographer David Hutchinson asked about that too and he was told they would depart after a ceremony at 7. He shared this evening photo:

Tomorrow’s stop is Dash Point State Park.

FRIDAY MORNING NOTE: The departures are not happening en masse.

Our photographer was there from 8 am until about 9:30 and reports that two canoes had left by then. We’re going back shortly for an update.

Alki Beach tomorrow, Suquamish tonight for Tribal Journey canoe families

(WSB photo, 2017)

As first reported here last week, dozens of canoe families participating in this year’s Tribal Canoe Journey – the Power Paddle to Puyallup – are expected to land on Alki Beach tomorrow afternoon (Thursday, July 26th). Their hosts the Muckleshoot Tribe plan to be ready to welcome arrivals as early as noon. The Puyallup-bound canoe families are on the west side of Puget Sound at Suquamish tonight; the schedule for their stop there says they’ll be leaving as early as 8 am. More canoes are visiting Alki this year than last because rather than this being a stop on the way north, this year it’s a southbound stop close to the end of the journey (see the map here). After arriving on Alki, canoe families and their support crews will travel to the Muckleshoot Powwow Grounds in Auburn for the night. During our coverage tomorrow, we’ll report on plans for the Friday departure, which also usually draws spectators

Sick sea lion removed from West Seattle beach

6:33 PM: The photos are from Kersti Muul, one of the local wildlife advocates who had been tracking the saga of this California sea lion for the past week or so.

The sea lion, nicknamed Dudley, was severely underweight and had several signs of major illness/injury, so the state Department of Fish and Wildlife removed him this morning from the beach at Cove 3.

No veterinarian was available to euthanize the sea lion on the scene, so he had to be taken away. They would have let nature run its course, Kersti says, but he was on a public beach and that posed hazards both for him and for the public.

8:34 PM: Kersti mentioned in correspondence with us that Seal Sitters have been dealing with Dudley, and now we’ve heard from them. David Hutchinson sent this:

Since last Friday, Seal Sitters’ volunteers have been monitoring the location and condition of a lone California Sea Lion at various spots along Harbor Avenue. Nicknamed “Dudley,” this animal did not make the normal migration south this spring, possibly due to health conditions. It soon became apparent that his health was extremely compromised. He recently began hauling out at Cove #3, just north of Marination, which was a potentially dangerous spot for him and for the public. In consultation with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and SR3, it was determined that the best course of action would be capture and removal from that location. This morning a crew from WDFW, along with a specialist from NOAA, successfully removed him from Cove #3 and transported him to a WDFW facility in Lakewood. Late this afternoon, we were informed that his health was compromised to the point that euthanasia was required. A necropsy will be performed tomorrow and Seal Sitters will be notified of the results.

We want to take this opportunity to thank Steve Jeffries of WDFW and his staff, along with Jeff Harris of NOAA, for their excellent job with the capture and removal. We greatly appreciate the input and assistance of Casey McClean, Co-Executive Director of SR3, in this difficult case.

Also, Seal Sitters would like to say a special thanks to Greg Whittaker of Alki Kayak Tours and his staff for their patience and cooperation these last few days.

Tribal Journeys canoes to stop at Alki Beach again this year

IMG_5343(WSB photo from canoes’ 2016 arrival on Alki)

More than 100 canoes representing Pacific Northwest Native tribes/nations (listed here) are registered for this year’s regional Tribal Journey, the Power Paddle to Puyallup. Two days before the official July 28th arrival in the South Sound, canoes will land at Alki Beach for an overnight stay hosted by the Muckleshoot Tribe. The landings map on the journey website shows Thursday, July 26th, as the day for the Alki arrival, and we have confirmed the date with Muckleshoot cultural director Willard Bill Jr., who says they expect to start receiving canoe families at Alki around noon that day. (They will then travel by land to the Muckleshoot Powwow Grounds in Auburn.) Every year a different tribe/nation in the region hosts the celebration at the end of the journey route; here’s what Puyallup Tribal Council chair Bill Sterud has written about this year’s event.

P.S. Some canoes will be trackable via this map.

West Seattle scenes: Low-low tide today – and almost as low on Saturday

We’ll forgive you if you take a break from West Seattle Summer Fest for a bit tomorrow and go check out the low-low tide … which will be almost as low as today’s! Thanks for sharing photos – above, by Mark McAndrews, looking toward downtown; below, three photos of wildlife seen at low tide by Erica Sokoloff:

Tomorrow’s lowest tide is at 12:26 pm, -3.5 feet (today’s was -3.6). It’ll be the last local low tide beyond minus 3 feet until June of next year.

PHOTOS: 2018 Seafair Pirates Landing, report #2 – what happened onshore

(WSB photos by Patrick Sand)

The waiting’s the hardest part! But the crowd at Alki Beach this afternoon finally got to greet the Seafair Pirates:

This year, the scalawags’ accomplices at West Seattle-headquartered Global Diving and Salvage had to bring them north from the uncharted waters of Burien, so they appeared from around Alki Point – and then, once they were ashore, it was every landlubber for themselves:

Somehow, the Pirates made their way through the throng to the stage, where County Executive (and lifelong West Seattleite) Dow Constantine welcomed them:

Also onstage, a coronation of sorts for the Pirates’ new Captain Kidd, courtesy of this year’s Seafair King Neptune, Sonny Sixkiller:

(Queen AlcyoneCupcake Royale founder Jody Hall – was on hand too.) Sonny’s son, Casey Sixkiller, is Chief Operating Officer in the Constantine administration. Offstage, we photographed him, son Will, the executive and wife Shirley Carlson and their daughter Sabrina:

The Pirates, meantime, are sailing into a busy-as-ever summer.

Two weeks from today, they’ll be back in West Seattle for the Grand Parade (11 am, southbound on California from Lander to Edmunds) – and you never know where else you might see them on land or sea!

Seafair Pirates Landing, report #1: The arrival

Just in case you wondered – yes, the Seafair Pirates have arrived at Alki! They sailed up from the exotic south (with the occasional cannon blast audible from Fauntleroy and Beach Drive) and approached shore around 1:40 pm. More to come in report #2…

Alki Beach beware – Seafair Pirates Landing tomorrow!

July 6, 2018 4:42 pm
|    Comments Off on Alki Beach beware – Seafair Pirates Landing tomorrow!
 |   Fun stuff to do | West Seattle beaches | West Seattle news

IMG_2307
(2016 Seafair Pirates sighting offshore, photographed by Paul Panzl, from the yacht Pearl)

Alki Beach will be awash in pirate fans tomorrow (Saturday, July 7th) as the Seafair Pirates approach for their annual landing. As usual (as previewed here last month), the occasion calls for an all-day festival, 10 am-5 pm, with vendors, kids’ rides, and music. The stars of the show will be ashore sometime in the early afternoon – last estimate we heard is 1:30ish, but that could change … they’re pirates, after all. You’ll usually hear cannon booms offshore as they get close; eventually they’ll pull up in their landing craft and wade ashore, into the crowd that gathers near Alki Bathhouse (60th SW/Alki SW). Their non-seagoing Moby Duck usually awaits them along the street, but not until their arrival has been followed by photos and pillaging. This is the first big event of the four weeks at the heart of Seafair; the Pirates will be back for the West Seattle Grand Parade two weeks later, but this is the one time you get to see them sail in! (Forecast, by the way, looks perfect.)

Seeing red water again? Noctiluca is back along West Seattle shores

July 3, 2018 3:48 pm
|    Comments Off on Seeing red water again? Noctiluca is back along West Seattle shores
 |   Environment | Seen at sea | West Seattle beaches | West Seattle news

That photo is from the Lincoln Park area, taken by Stani – one of several people who’ve pointed out this afternoon that the red algae bloom known as Noctiluca is back off West Seattle shores today.

We reported on sightings about a month ago too – same time the state Department of Ecology explained it here. It’s non-toxic, as Ecology’s post notes, but it’s not a good thing: “An increase in the abundance of Noctiluca is an indication of an unbalanced system, and while the plankton is not toxic itself, their presence creates a cascade of effects in the marine food web. … While Noctiluca are naturally occurring and blooms have been observed and recorded in Puget Sound since the 1940’s, there is growing concern that human-caused nutrient over-enrichment is increasing the intensity, changing the timing, and increasing the spatial distribution of Noctiluca blooms.”

Soon to be seen off West Seattle: Seafair Pirates, en route to annual landing


(July 2017 Seafair Pirates Landing photo tweeted by Brandon, @olysportsblog)

Another nautical story: We’re now less than two weeks away from the annual Seafair Pirates Landing on Alki Beach – Saturday, July 7th. As with all big events, an official “neighborhood notification” is required, and we’ve received it from event producer Oliver Little:

WHAT: Seattle Seafair Pirate Landing
WHERE: Alki Beach Park
DATE: July 7, 2018
TIME: 7:00 AM – 6:00 PM
WHO: Seattle Seafair Pirates

On 7/7/2018, our organization The Seattle Seafair Pirates will be producing a special event in the Alki Beach neighborhood called The Seattle Seafair Pirate Landing. The Alki Beach Neighborhood has again
been chosen as the location for this event because of the historical significance. We are thrilled to be
guests in your neighborhood and it’s important to us that we are communicating clearly with you, the
neighbors.

EVENT DESCRIPTION:
• Event hours are from 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM on July 7, 2018.
• We will be loading in beginning at 7:00 AM on July 7, 2018, and will load out until 6:00 PM on July 7, 2018.
• We will leave your neighborhood as we found it: litter and recycling will be handled by Recology.
• During the event hours, we expect between 1,000-3,000 attendees per day.
• Streets will not be closed nor have limited vehicle and/or pedestrian access.
• We will have amplified sound during the hours of 10:00 AM and 4:00 PM on July 7, 2018.
• Music and other entertainment will be located on the Northwest side of the Alki Beach Bathhouse.

We are working closely with the City of Seattle Special Events Committee to minimize the impacts of the
event. Our goal is to create an enjoyable and positive experience in your neighborhood. If you or any of the surrounding residents and businesses have questions or comments about impacts of this event, please email us at:

Oliver Little, Event Operations – oliver@monumentalundertaking.com
Chris Swenson, Chair, City of Seattle Special Events Office – chris.swenson@seattle.gov

Always the big question, “When will the pirates land?” This year it’s expected to be around 1:30 – could be earlier, though! (Here’s our coverage from last year.)

WAY OUT: Low-low tide on West Seattle beaches

12:15 PM: Our photo is from Duwamish Head, where low-low tides like today (-3.5 feet about 15 minutes ago, -3.7 at 12:42 pm tomorrow) reveal hints of West Seattle history, like the site of the Luna Park amusement park, destroyed by fire more than a century ago. If you go exploring, tread lightly!

12:24 PM: From there, we headed to Constellation Park south of Alki Point, one of two locations where you’ll find Seattle Aquarium volunteer beach naturalists, until 1:30 pm today. As our photo shows, you’ll also find a lot of people – the almost-summer low-low tides bring out school field trips, too; we’ve seen several buses, even all the way from Issaquah.

West Seattle beachwalking alert! Very low tides ahead next four days

(June 2017 tide, out past minus three feet, looking north from Emma Schmitz Memorial Overlook)

The next four days bring a bonus for beachwalkers: Low-low tides of minus 3 feet or lower:

Wednesday, 11:11 am: -3.0
Thursday, 11:55 am: -3.5
Friday, 12:42 pm: -3.7
Saturday, 1:30 pm: -3.4

Here’s our favorite chart. You can also check tides any time on the WSB Weather page.

P.S. Seattle Aquarium volunteer beach naturalists will be out too – here’s the schedule.

Notice the red water? Likely the algae bloom known as noctiluca again

ORIGINAL REPORT, THURSDAY: Thanks to Jill for the photo. She asked about the red water along the shore south of Fauntleroy. Chances are that it’s the nontoxic algae bloom known as noctiluca, which has shown up time and again over the years – compare that photo to others we’ve published, such as 2014 and 2012. As explained by this state Department of Ecology webpage, noctiluca blooms are nontoxic.

MONDAY UPDATE: Thanks to Kersti Muul for turning up this new Ecology link confirming ongoing algae blooms.

FOLLOWUP: Testing to start as a prelude to Beach Drive seawall work at Emma Schmitz Memorial Overlook

June 5, 2018 4:21 pm
|    Comments Off on FOLLOWUP: Testing to start as a prelude to Beach Drive seawall work at Emma Schmitz Memorial Overlook
 |   West Seattle beaches | West Seattle news | West Seattle parks

(2014 US Army Corps of Engineers photo of failing seawall)

For the first time since last summer, we have an update on the plan for seawall work at Emma Schmitz Memorial Overlook. We just received this explanation from Seattle Parks of what’s about to happen:

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps), the City of Seattle, and Seattle Parks and Recreation (SPR) are collaborating on the Emma Schmitz seawall repair. Together we are ensuring a successful cost-sharing program to restore shoreline protection at Emma Schmitz Memorial Overlook in West Seattle. SPR entered into a Project Partnership Agreement with the Corps for the replacement of the seawall. The Corps is responsible for the design of the seawall, and one of the steps in the design process is to take soil borings to inform the final design. Drill equipment will be on site for several days starting the week of June 4.

Built circa 1927, the 450-foot stretch of seawall supports important City and County infrastructure, including a 54-inch sewer main, various Seattle Public Utilities drainage and wastewater lines, and Beach Drive Southwest road. The seawall is badly deteriorated, with a 30 percent chance of failure in the event of severe storm or tidal conditions. The new seawall will be built approximately 2 feet seaward and 2 feet higher than the existing wall, thus significantly improving the grade of this scenic viewpoint for the enjoyment of park users as well as ensuring long-term stability.

The implementation cost of the recommended plan is estimated to be more than $2 million, and will be cost-shared with 65 percent federal funds and 35 percent non-federal funds. The non-federal sponsor, SPR, is responsible for all lands, easements, right-of-ways, relocations, and/or disposal areas which are controlled by the sponsor.

The Corps is designing the seawall, and SPR will be designing the park amenities on top of the wall area. SPR will be holding a public meeting to provide information and gather input on these park amenities.

For more information on the boring and soil collection please visit (here) or SPR Emma Schmitz Memorial Overlook page.

Two updates from Seal Sitters

May 23, 2018 9:50 pm
|    Comments Off on Two updates from Seal Sitters
 |   West Seattle beaches | West Seattle news | Wildlife

(Uno the harbor seal seems to be attempting a facepalm, having not signed up for training in time)

On behalf of Seal Sitters, a photo and update from David Hutchinson:

All spaces for the June 9th Seal Sitters’ training have been filled. If you were not able to attend this session, but are still interested in becoming a Seal Sitter, please contact us at SealSitters.Outreach@msn.com and we will notify you when our next training has been scheduled.

We have had a seal on the beach twice this week and “pupping season” in south Puget Sound will be starting soon. Just a reminder, if you see any marine mammal on a West Seattle beach, keep back, keep people and pets away, and please call our Hotline at 206-905-SEAL (7325).

West Seattle scene: Exploring at low-low tide

May 16, 2018 5:13 pm
|    Comments Off on West Seattle scene: Exploring at low-low tide
 |   West Seattle beaches | West Seattle news

Thanks to Don Brubeck for the photo taken along West Seattle’s west-facing shore during this afternoon’s low-low tide! As we mentioned in the daily highlight list, it was out to 2.5 feet just afternoon. Tomorrow and Friday, even lower – -2.9 feet at 1 pm Thursday and 1:47 pm Friday. If you can’t go out and tidewalk until the weekend, no worries – Saturday’s low tide will still be good for (carefully) exploring, -2.4 feet at 2:38 pm. Next month, the low-low tides get even lower: -3 feet and further, June 13-16. (Here’s our favorite tide chart. We have one – better for short-term consultation – on the WSB West Seattle Weather page, too.)

West Seattle scene: Sunbathing with a friend

Thanks to Gary Jones for the photos, which were too sweet to put on hold until, say, tomorrow morning’s highlights. Notice in the top photo that Harbor Seal #1 is just hanging out at low tide off Constellation Park, with somebody peeking from the water to the left … and then deciding to get out and join the basking.

Flagging us to the same scene via Twitter, @1fox2fox noted, “As always, please be respectful to these sentinels of the Sound qnd give them space.” And if they come ashore, give Seal Sitters a call … 206-905-SEAL. P.S. Low-low tides are coming up later this month – lower than -2 feet for four afternoons starting Wednesday, May 16th.

FOLLOWUP: What else we’ve found out about Alki Beach’s new fire rings

(Monday photo courtesy Vlad Oustimovitch)

The arrival this past Monday of new, lockable fire rings at Alki Beach Park – replacing all seven of the old ones – raised some questions, and now we’ve received answers from Seattle Parks spokesperson Christina Hirsch:

*Policies for when they’re unlocked and locked? “The exact hours/procedures for locking the lids is being determined with staff. Currently, the lids are unlocked. We will post hours and procedure information on our website in the next couple of weeks once the information has been finalized.”

*Why were the old ones replaced? The closable lid “helps to put out the fire,” Hirsch says, adding “we also ask that folks douse their fire with water.” They hope the lockability “will help prevent fires on off-hours and prevent bonfires during burn bans.” And the previous ones “were old, rusty and beginning to fall apart.”

*How much did the new ones cost? “The new pits were designed and created in-house and are like the pits we installed at Golden Gardens Park. Each pit costs approximately $1,500 (not including delivery and installation).”

SEEN ON SHORE: ‘Very large’ shark washes up south of Fauntleroy ferry dock

Sara sent the photo, saying that “very large” shark washed up on the beach not too far south of the Fauntleroy ferry dock over the weekend. She reported it to the state Fish and Wildlife Department; after sending them the photo, she said, they thought it might be a soupfin shark. Any other guesses?