West Seattle people 2124 results

CONGRATULATIONS! West Seattle’s Kelly Crum chosen for Seafair Scholarship Program for Women court

Back in 2015, the year she also became a Holy Names Academy graduate, Kelly Crum was crowned West Seattle Hi-Yu Senior Court Queen. Now she’s celebrating another achievement: Wednesday night at Salty’s on Alki (WSB sponsor), Kelly was announced as a member of this year’s Seafair Scholarship Program for Women court – second runner-up to Miss Seafair. Kelly is at right in the photo above with 1st runner-up Bianca Llorico (left) and the new Miss Seafair Zoraida Valdovinos (center). Their scholarships were announced at a special event hosted by the Seafair Commodores. Thanks to Kelly’s proud mom Gloria Teves for the photo and report! You will see them all in this Saturday’s West Seattle Grand Parade (which runs south on California from Lander to Edmunds, official start time 11 am, but the Seattle and Vancouver, B.C., Police motorcycle drill teams get going as early as 10:30 am). Kelly will be a senior at Gonzaga University this fall; she is also an alumna of Holy Rosary in West Seattle.

COUNTDOWN: West Seattle Grand Parade and PAWrade notes, with 4 days to go

Two notes tonight as Saturday’s 2018 West Seattle Grand Parade gets closer:

COACH VELKO GETS HIS TROPHY: At tonight’s West Seattle Big Band Concert in the Park, this year’s Orville Rummel Trophy for Outstanding Service to the Community recipient Velko Vitalich accepted the trophy, with which he’ll ride in Saturday’s parade.

The trophy was presented to the retired West Seattle High School baseball and golf coach by the Rotary Club of West Seattle Service Foundation‘s parade chair Keith Hughes, assisted by parade coordinators Michelle Edwards and Jim Edwards, who also happen to be with the WS Big Band (musician and director, respectively).

PAWRADE UPDATE: Another reminder that before Saturday’s Grand Parade, you can be part of local history by participating, with your dog, in the first-ever West Seattle PAWrade:

The West Seattle Junction Association and Rotary are teaming up to present the PAWrade right before the Grand Parade arrives in The Junction. Prizes! Judges for the categories shown above are from local pet-related businesses/organizations, and they’ll be stationed along the route. It’s a short one, so don’t worry about Fido fatigue – it starts at California/Genesee at 11 am, between the motorcycle drill teams’ conclusion and the arrival of the rest of the parade, and proceeds to California/Edmunds – then you can go back and watch the Grand Parade! Sign up here if you’re ready to commit, or just show up at the start on Saturday!

TOMORROW: Next preview takes you to the parade lineup meeting!

‘What challenges do you think you’ll have as you get older?’

That’s the question the city hopes you will answer, whatever your age, via a new survey. It was sent to WSB by Irene Stewart, the longtime West Seattle community advocate who works in aging and disability services for the city Human Services Department:

Will you be able to live independently in your current home or a home of your choice? How do you prefer to get information about services and community resources? Aging and Disability Services — the Area Agency on Aging for Seattle & King County — wants to know! You can help by taking the community survey at surveymonkey.com/r/V5WKDF8. This survey is for adults (age 18+), not just older adults or others who already use their services. Share the link with family, friends, neighbors, and colleagues of all backgrounds. The survey is available until the end of July. For alternative formats or other languages, e-mail aginginfo@seattle.gov.

COMMUNITY GIVING: Senior Center of West Seattle celebrates gift from Adah Cruzen

(Photo courtesy Senior Center of West Seattle)

From left, that’s Adah Cruzen with Senior Center of West Seattle executive director Lyle Evans and social worker Holly McNeil. The occasion: A celebration honoring a big gift for the center, which relies on donations for most of its budget. Evans tells the story:

Last month the Center was approached by a member of the community who asked what the Center needed in order to continue and enhance operations. I provided a wish list, not knowing the impact that list would have. About three weeks later, Adah Cruzen invited me to her home for lunch.

If you haven’t had the pleasure of meeting Adah, she is a lovely, unassuming woman with a gigantic heart and a very sweet demeanor. Many in West Seattle know and love her. Many also knew her husband, Earl Cruzen, the “Father” of Murals of West Seattle and local community leader. Adah talked about how Earl cared so much about West Seattle and wanted to leave a legacy gift to ensure the Senior Center was taken care of.

Adah beamed when she talked about her love of the Ukulele group and how she loves eating in the Café. She asked me how she could best support the Center. “What’s at the top of your wish list?” she asked. We then discussed the importance of our Westside Friends outreach program that helps homebound elders, as well as the importance of good food to those who may have their single most nutritious meal of the day here at the Center. Additionally, we discussed support for our many health and wellness programs, infrastructure improvements, new computers for staff, as well as implementing a Point of Sale system to enhance existing services.

Our conversation included how vitally important it is to keep elders active in order for them to remain healthy, funding of the newsletter, and a commercial ice machine. We discussed how Hatten Hall needs improvement in order to bring more large groups into the Center, and how community is built one person at a time. This list was meant to be a partial list of items that the Center needs. I was overcome with emotion when Adah said she would fund everything we’d talked about with a legacy gift of $100,000!

We at the Center envisioned a day when we could expand physical space, programs, and outreach to welcome more of the people who need us the most. We want to become even more vibrant and more essential to those we serve, to do what we do better and grander. Earl and Adah Cruzen’s gift can help make that vision a reality. Thank you, Adah and Earl, for your most generous support! We appreciate it enormously!

Just two months ago, the mural-restoration project announced an identical gift from the Cruzens. Speaking of which, we’ll have an update on that a little later this evening!

White Center Mary’s Place shelter latest beneficiary of West Seattleite’s project Libraries for All

(Photo by Andrea Laughery)

By Judy Pickens
Special to West Seattle Blog

Fresh paint, matching furniture, and planned décor are not the norm for families traumatized by homelessness. Those fortunate enough to find shelter get accustomed to make-do accommodations.

Not so the new library at the Mary’s Place shelter in White Center. It’s bright, comfortable, and inviting – whether a parent wants to read to her kids, enjoy a book himself, use a computer, or simply take a break to rewind.

A busy week of painting, assembling, and stocking culminated this past Saturday when the third Libraries for All project opened to Mary’s Place residents. Spearheaded by high-school senior Alina Guyon, a West Seattle resident, the project attracted help from several other volunteers, plus donations of books and laptops. The $5,250 in funding for expenses came from All the Sky Foundation.

Mary’s Place had an assortment of children’s books when Alina offered to create a real library. Starting with donated books (many from West Seattle), Alina enhanced the 250-square-foot room with computers so residents can search for jobs and stay connected with key people in their lives. The emphasis on children now includes kid-friendly DVDs.

“When families are trying to survive, education is set aside until the most pressing things in life are figured out and this break in a child’s education can create a long-term problem,” Alina said. “Having access to a library can help that child step back into school and stay at grade level.”

The 24-hour White Center Mary’s Place opened in June 2017 with a capacity of 70 adults and children. It is one of four full-service family centers that the nonprofit operates in the greater Seattle area.

(Photo by Alina Guyon)

Mary’s Place residents and members of Girl Scout Troop #40890 (photo above) helped stock the shelves with about 1,000 well-organized books. Knowing that loss and damage are inevitable, Libraries for All will replenish the supply as needed. The Mary’s Place staff will manage the library, use the projector to show movies, and maintain the computers.

The first Libraries for All project was for residents of a refugee facility near Kampala, Uganda, and the second was for children in a red-light district of Kolkata, India. Alina is weighing options for Project #4. Read more at libraries4all.com.

Now with its greatly enlarged collection of books, White Center Mary’s Place has put out a call for volunteers willing to read with children. To learn more, email volunteer@marysplaceseattle.org or call 206-621-8474.

Roxhill Park event kicks off ‘Free Summer Meals’ program

June 29, 2018 9:42 am
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 |   West Seattle news | West Seattle people

Fun times at Roxhill Park with a serious message – no kids/teens need to go hungry this summer. United Way-King County organized a Field Day party on Thursday afternoon with activities, games, and information.

Roxhill Park is one of the locations for summer food programs in West Seattle – but not the only one; there are at least half a dozen others. To find the locations and dates, use this lookup tool or call 866-348-6479. They’re open to everyone 18 and younger, no enrollment, no charge.

‘Families Belong Together’ march set for West Seattle on Saturday

Thanks to Kathy for the tip: West Seattle will be the site of one of the marches set around the country this Saturday to protest federal asylum-seeker-detention policies. The announcement invites people to gather “at the pavilion in the southwest corner of” Lincoln Park at 10 am Saturday and says the march will then head along Fauntleroy Way starting at 10:45 am. We have a message out to the organizer looking for more details.

Skatepark legend Mark ‘Monk’ Hubbard of Grindline, 1970-2018

The film embedded above tells the story of a West Seattle man who touched lives around the world, and lived his in a big way, and this weekend brought word he is gone too soon. Family, friends, and fans are mourning Mark “Monk” Hubbard, who founded and led renowned skatepark design/build company Grindline. The company announced his death on Instagram; Q13 quotes a friend as saying he died at the West Seattle home he shared with his wife and three children. Grindline designed and built the Delridge Skatepark; Mr. Hubbard got a big shoutout when its grand opening was celebrated at Delridge Day in 2011. The Roxhill Skatepark, built a year later, was also a Grindline project, and Mr. Hubbard’s company helped prep the adjacent site where Roxhill Playground was overhauled. That’s not the only example of his West Seattle community involvement – WSB archives include a shoutout for his concrete work paving the way for a new Snack Shack at the Pee-Wee baseball fields in Riverview last year. No word yet on a memorial; we’ll update if/when one is announced.

ADDED SATURDAY: His family sends word of the June 22nd (next Friday) celebration of Mr. Hubbard’s life at Delridge Skatepark, 3-6 pm.

3 ways to celebrate Pride Month with West Seattle YMCA

(WSB photo)

June is Pride Month, and the front-desk decorations are just one way the West Seattle YMCA (WSB sponsor) is celebrating. From executive director Shalimar Gonzales:

For more than 165 years, the Y has played a central role in knitting together the vibrant fabric of America. We believe the Y must continue to lead the way to a brighter future by following our belief that we are stronger when our doors are open to all. We want to ensure all people- across all dimension of diversity- feel welcome and valued as part of the Y family.

At the Y, we use the month of June to celebrate and highlight our LGBTQ+ community, members, and staff. We honor those who have done the hard work for equity and have dedicated the Y to be among them. We remember the brutality and inhumanity that has been and is perpetrated against our LGBTQ+ family. And most of all we honor all those who are living life as their authentic selves and those who are on the path to that discovery.

No matter who you are, you are seen, appreciated and celebrated at the Y.

The West Seattle YMCA has several opportunities for folks interested in showing their support:

· Through June 30: Toiletry Drive for LGBTQ+ Youth. This month we are supporting Lambert House, an LGBTQ drop-in youth center on Capitol Hill. They have requested sock and travel size personal care products to support LGBTQ youth throughout Seattle that access their services.

· June 28, 6:30-7:30 pm: Drag Queen Story Hour: Join special guest, Mama T, for a fun-filled hour of stories, photos, and fun! Sharing stories that celebrate inclusion, acceptance, and diversity, Mama T will provide a fun and lighthearted story time at the West Seattle YMCA for kids and their families. Feel free to bring your pillows, blankets, or favorite stuffed animal! Light refreshments will be available. Hold your spot by (going here).

· Join the West Seattle and Fauntleroy YMCA without paying a joining fee through Sunday, June 10th, using the code “PRIDE.”

The Y’s main West Seattle location is in The Triangle at 36th/Snoqualmie; in Fauntleroy, it’s at 9140 California SW.

Northwest premiere next weekend for ‘Return to Mount Kennedy,’ documentary with West Seattle ties

A new documentary that has its Northwest premiere next weekend has multiple West Seattle ties. You’ll recognize the local names involved with “Return to Mount Kennedy.” Here’s the announcement:

The locally produced documentary chronicles the expedition of the sons of Senator Robert F. Kennedy and mountaineering icon Jim Whittaker, and features original music by Eddie Vedder.

Director Eric Becker and other special guests will attend the hometown screening.

In 1965, Robert Kennedy was the first man to summit Mount Kennedy in the Yukon Territory, named in honor of his late brother. Leading that expedition was Jim Whittaker, the first American to summit Everest and original fulltime employee of REI.

50 years later, Jim’s sons Bob and Leif, along with Christopher Kennedy, decide to climb the mountain again in honor of their fathers’ joint accomplishment and unique friendship. Seattle-based filmmaker Eric Becker’s touching documentary combines archival footage —including several Kennedy home movies — with interviews from Jim himself and those who know them best as we follow three sons and the journey literally in their fathers’ footsteps.

The documentary features original music by Eddie Vedder, never-before-seen archival footage, and includes interviews with Sub Pop records co-founder Bruce Pavitt, mountain guide Dave Hahn, and members of the original climbing team.

The film was scheduled to have its world premiere last night as the opening night film of the Telluride Mountainfilm Festival. Its scheduled local screenings are Saturday, June 2 at 3:30 pm at Kirkland Performance Center (tickets here), and two at SIFF Uptown on Queen Anne – Saturday, June 9 at 6:30 pm, and Sunday, June 10, at 3 pm (tickets here).

UPDATE: Local food and beverage purveyors delight hundreds at Taste of West Seattle 2018, helping the Helpline, delectably

(UPDATED FRIDAY AFTERNOON with tally, vote winners)

THURSDAY NIGHT: Dozens of West Seattle food and beverage providers provided bites and sips tonight to help the West Seattle Helpline keep up its work, centering on preventing homelessness and other emergency assistance. It’s work that warms the hearts of those who do it:

Above are First Lutheran Church of West Seattle‘s Rev. Ron Marshall from the Helpline board, with Judi Yazzolino (right) from the West Seattle Food Bank and Judi’s niece Amie Edmondson. Among the taste providers, many WSB sponsors, including Leslie Thomson from Dream Dinners in The Junction (where you put together meals and take them home for cooking later):

The team from Metropolitan Market:

Pecos Pit was offering tastes of their “sticky sauce”:

From Mission Cantina, mango salsa:

The sign said it all for Salty’s on Alki:

West 5 is famous for its mac-and-cheese, which Dean and Sidney were serving up out on the patio:

Circa is known for its gumbo:

And what’s a repast without wine? Viscon Cellars was pouring:

The Westy was on the event’s lineup card too! We’ll be following up with the Helpline for the Taste tally tomorrow.

ADDED FRIDAY AFTERNOON: Fundraising total was $70,000, reports Layla Al-Jamal Judkins from the Helpline. And the winners of the voting by attendees:

Best Sip: Cafe Osita
Best Sweet: Bakery Nouveau
Best Pour: Beveridge Place
Best Taste: Tuxedos and Tennis Shoes

COUNTDOWN: 15th anniversary of Laps With Lou at Pathfinder to help Make-A-Wish

May 24, 2018 2:05 pm
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 |   How to help | Pigeon Point | West Seattle news | West Seattle people | West Seattle schools

(WSB photo, June 2017)

Looking beyond Memorial Day – one of our favorite annual West Seattle events is happening a week from tomorrow. Retired Pathfinder K-8 P-E teacher Lou Cutler returns to the school on Pigeon Point on Friday, June 1st, to run laps raising money for Make-A-Wish – one lap around the field for each year he’ll be celebrating on his upcoming birthday. This year – the 15th anniversary of “Laps With Lou” – that’s 67 laps! He’ll start around 9 am, with most of the school joining him, and continue through most of the day (last year he wrapped up around 1:45). You’re invited to be there to cheer him on and/or join in the run and/or pledge online! Pathfinder is at 1901 SW Genesee.

Cle Elum chimps get special gift from West Seattle seniors

The folks at Providence sent that photo, explaining that the quilt the result of “a service project over a year in the making.” Providence ElderPlace participants made it for Chimpanzees Sanctuary Northwest in Cle Elum. They heard about the sanctuary via NPR and formed a group about chimpanzees, reading about them and watching videos. Then they decided to make a quilt – with a square for each of the seven chimps living at the sanctuary. A volunteer from Providence Mount St. Vincent‘s sewing room helped with the final sewing after participants did all the pinning. The quilt’s creators are hoping to see their gift turn up on the sanctuary’s blog.

West Seattle scene: Why there’s a line outside Hiawatha Community Center

Thanks to Amy for the photo. She explains that the guy in the foreground outside Hiawatha Community Center is her husband, “taking a vacation day from work to wait in line with many other working parents for a chance at a spot in Seattle Parks and Recreation’s after-care program!”

As verified by this post on Seattle Parks‘ blog-format website Parkways, today is indeed the first day to sign up for before- and after-school care offered next year. This one-sheet has specifics, including Hiawatha’s programs at not only the center itself, but also at Genesee Hill and Lafayette Elementaries, as well as the former Schmitz Park Elementary. In our area, Alki, Delridge, and High Point Community Centers have programs too.

HAPPY ANNIVERSARY! 46 years for Bob and Fran Zickes

Congratulations to Bob and Fran Zickes for 46 years of marriage – and more, as their son Ben Zickes writes in this announcement to share with you:

My parents are my heroes. They are dedicated members of the West Seattle community and have been Seaview residents for over four decades. On this day, their 46th wedding anniversary, I hope to briefly share their story, in honor of their service to our beloved neighborhood.

Bob and Fran Zickes were married May 6th, 1972 in Seattle at St Patrick’s on Capitol Hill. They share birthdays on consecutive days, May 7th (Mom, her 72nd) and May 8th (Dad, his 73rd).

Both have lived a life dedicated to service in the Seattle community and I could not be more proud.

Mom was a nanny to five local children in the 1980s and was a teacher’s assistant in the 1990s at Rainier Beach HS and later at Holy Rosary. She volunteered her time reading to kids at the public library in retirement. Today, she is an active member of the senior center and a volunteer at the Junction Stop N Shop, which supports the center. An enthusiastic walker and golfer (longtime member at West Seattle Golf Course), mom even has three career Hole-In-Ones! Legendary Sonics broadcaster Kevin Calabro once lovingly called her “a housewife from West Seattle who cleaned our clocks” when recalling a round they played together on KJR radio.

Dad is an old soul, fisherman, and gardener since birth. After graduating from Notre Dame, he served in the Air Force, which took him to Korea just after he met Mom. After the service and a return to Seattle, his 30-year career was spent in the Parks Department of King County, where he championed efforts like the pea patch program, the original “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle” slogan of the early 1990s, and efforts to start composting residential yard waste. Near retirement, Dad served as a loaned executive from King County for the United Way campaign for multiple years. In retirement, Dad spent 10 years as a Left Field gate host for the Mariners. For as long as I can remember, Dad has donated his Wednesday mornings to the Meals on Wheels program in West Seattle. Dad too loves to golf, fish, and take daily walks with Mom around the neighborhood. You’ll find him tending to his garden most days (donating extras to the WS Food Bank), if he’s not busy bowling at Roxbury Lanes.

I think if my parents were to tell you their secrets to a long and happy partnership, a healthy dose of “daily walks” and a solid weekly “routine” would be right at the top of the list.

If you ever see them taking their walks around West Seattle, I invite you to say Hello! Congratulations, Mom and Dad!

LIBRARIES FOR ALL: Books from West Seattle now on shelves in India

(Alina [seated] and Sheryl Guyon [right] with staff and children at New Vision’s preschool)

By Judy Pickens
Special to West Seattle Blog

The red-light district in Kolkata, India, is a long way from home for Fauntleroy resident Alina Guyon but it’s where she and her mother, Sheryl Guyon, spent two weeks in April to create the second Libraries for All resource.

As reported here in August, Alina’s first venture was to plan, fund, ship, assemble, and stock a 200-sq. ft. library in an impoverished suburb of Kampala, Uganda, that has become a waystation for women and children fleeing violence in several African countries. With that one complete, she turned her attention to creating a safe learning place for the children of brothel workers in a different but equally challenging setting.

Using a grant from the Seattle-based All the Sky Foundation dedicated to gender equity, Alina collaborated with New Light, a non-profit working to break the cycle of prostitution by educating and housing scores of children and aiding their mothers. While there, Alina met with young children to broaden their understanding of the potential of girls and women.

New Light identified a space for the library, books were shipped, and travel plans made, only to have the space fall through and the container get held up in customs. As in Uganda where customs proved problematic, Alina and Sheryl had to do their best with what was at hand.


(Coloring pages designed by Washington artist Nina Hartman were the centerpiece of Alina’s lesson on gender equality)

They cleared a corner in one of the agency’s homes, put down a rug, installed shelves, and stocked them with 400 locally donated books in Bengali and English. Shortly after returning home, they learned the hundreds of books donated in West Seattle would soon be on the shelves, too.

Over the winter, Libraries for All became a non-profit through Visions Made Viable, an incubator for social visionaries and entrepreneurs. This alliance provides legal, fiscal, and administrative services so Alina can focus on the work itself.

Two awards recently recognized that work. In March, King County Red Cross gave Alina a Youth Spirit of Service award and, on May 3, Seahawk quarterback Russell Wilson’s Why Not You Foundation honored her with its Washington Youth Leadership Award.

Next up could be a project very close to home to enhance library resources at the Mary’s Place shelter in White Center. Visit www.libraries4all.com to read more about these projects and subscribe to updates.

MLK Medal for Bettie Williams-Watson: West Seattleite, founder of Multi-Communities, helping survivors where #MeToo has yet to reach

(Bettie Williams-Watson, photographed this afternoon at MLK Medal recipients’ reception by WSB’s Patrick Sand)

By Tracy Record
West Seattle Blog editor

Bettie Williams-Watson has been doing “the work” for more than 30 years.

Her work with sexual assault and abuse survivors might seem to resonate more in this time of #MeToo.

But in the communities where she helps survivors – “We’re not there yet.”

The West Seattle resident’s organization is called Multi-Communities. She works with “predominantly African American faith communities, where we are still trying to break the silence and shame that exists.” And her work just earned her another award – today the King County Council honored her with the MLK Medal of Distinguished Service.

She started with a simple hope: “If I could just help one survivor, one woman and her child or children, be able to heal from the impact of physical and sexual violence, that it was worthwhile … now it’s been my shopping cart to push around for the last 33-plus years … I’m a 33-year-plus overnight sensation.”

While the #MeToo movement has erupted in a big way in the entertainment industry, government, and other arenas, Williams-Watson says, in her arena, “it’s a whole different ballgame because people have a hard time naming their experiences still … we are not there yet … In communities of color, we’re still wrapping our brain around, yes indeed, I was sexually abused … yes indeed, someone in leadership who had more power over me (did something that) was wrong, and it violated me … it’s hard to wrap your brain around. … Someone that loves us wouldn’t hurt us, my God, not a family member .. not a trusted person you’ve had a relationship with for years and years … you have built up other parts of that relationship that are really impacting and powerful so you can’t wrap your brain around the fact that person could indeed hurt you, could violate you, could kill you…”

Read More

VIDEO: New inspiration, new location, new ways to give @ WestSide Baby CommuniTea

April 23, 2018 12:51 pm
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 |   How to help | West Seattle news | West Seattle people

(WSB photos by Patrick Sand)

By Tracy Record
West Seattle Blog editor

“Today and every day, we have a choice to turn toward each other.”

That was the lesson and exhortation in a story told by WestSide Baby executive director Nancy Woodland at her organization’s biggest annual fundraiser, the CommuniTea, on Sunday afternoon.

The 600 people in attendance turned toward not only each other but also WS Baby in a big way, raising more than $362,000, much-needed money as the organization continues to grow and to serve more areas of King County, some far from its White Center headquarters.

This was the first year for the event at the downtown Sheraton, after six years at the Hilton near Sea-Tac Airport (this year’s take more than doubles the giving of its first year in that venue, 2012). The Sheraton’s Grand Ballroom was filled with supporters who made it there despite the area road closures that led to a rare Sunday afternoon traffic jam. We were a bit late and missed recording the performance of “Oh The Places We’ll Grow” by Carlynn Newhouse:

Newhouse, a poet, activist, actor/performer, and MC, had just the night before won the Youth Speaks Seattle Grand SlamMcInnis and Phineas:

Read More

VIDEO: Questions, answers, numbers @ West Seattle Chamber of Commerce homelessness forum

By Tracy Record
West Seattle Blog editor

“These are our neighbors.”

One of the participants in Saturday’s West Seattle Chamber of Commerce-presented forum on homelessness used that simple statement in the hope of debunking various myths about people experiencing it.

The almost-two-hours event also addressed frequently asked questions, such as where the city’s homelessness-related spending is going.

(L-R, Michael Maddux, Paul Lambros, Annie Blackledge, Sola Plumacher)

The speakers were, in order, Sola Plumacher from the city’s Human Services Department, which oversees its homelessness-related spending and initiatives; Michael Maddux, a local activist/advocate (who is also a City Council staffer but made it clear he was participating as a private citizen); Paul Lambros, executive director of nonprofit housing provider Plymouth Housing; Annie Blackledge, executive director of The Mockingbird Society, which is focused on ending youth homelessness and advocating for foster children. The Seattle Police Department was planning to send a speaker but canceled at the last minute. Introducing the forum was Chamber CEO Lynn Dennis; emceeing it, Chamber government-affairs chair Rik Keller. We recorded it all:

If you weren’t there and don’t have time to watch, here’s how it went:

Read More

West Seattle HS seniors show award-winning app at #HouseOfCode in Washington, D.C.

(Aidan Day and Will Rasmussen. Photos courtesy Laurie Rasmussen)

Lots of people take trips during spring break – but when West Seattle High School is back in session Monday, seniors Will Rasmussen and Aidan Day just might have the best travel story to tell. They were in Washington, D.C., for the House Of Code Summit, a gathering of students who won the 2017 Congressional App Challenge. Will and Aidan were the winners in the 7th Congressional District – as announced last December, they created an app aimed at saving teachers time, via functions “to make taking attendance quick and easy.” Here’s their demo video for the app, Roll Call:

The award gained them an invitation to the summit this week, including the #HouseOfCode Demo Day yesterday, at which students were to demonstrate their apps to lawmakers, “thus turning the House of Representatives into the #HouseOfCode.”

The event announcement added: “The annual gathering is quickly becoming the new National Science Fair, but focused specifically on computer science and technology entrepreneurship.” The summit overall also was intended to recognize the more than 200 winning students from 39 states and to give them a chance to “participate in career and STEM enrichment activities.” The competition had more than 4,100 participants nationwide, who submitted more than 1,270 original apps, almost double the number from a year earlier.

HAPPY ANNIVERSARY! 1 year for West Seattle Linux User Group

April 13, 2018 2:21 pm
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 |   West Seattle news | West Seattle online | West Seattle people

Congratulations to the West Seattle Linux User Group, now one year old. If you’re interested, you’re invited to its meeting tomorrow, which is also an anniversary breakfast. From co-founder Justin:

The West Seattle Linux User Group (WSeaLUG) is celebrating its one-year anniversary this month. It has been a great year getting to know fellow Linux enthusiasts in West Seattle and beyond. We have have average of 10 members show up every other Saturday morning to enjoy chatting and learning from each other about all things Linux. We have also had a few presentations about items such as ‘installing and configuring a web server,’ ‘LUKS & YubiKey,’ and ‘Linux Firewalls & IPTables,’ to name a few. We were also community sponsors of the Seattle GNU/Linux Conference last November.

If you are a Linux enthusiast or want to learn more about Linux, we hope you will join us.

Tomorrow morning’s meeting is at a different location than usual – Be’s Restaurant in The Junction, 9 am (4509 California SW). Otherwise, the club usually meets twice a month at the Fauntleroy YMCA (WSB sponsor) – check here; we list the meetings in the WSB West Seattle Event Calendar, too. (If your club meets regularly and is open to interested members of the public, we’d be happy to list your meetings too – e-mail the info to editor@westseattleblog.com – thank you!)

WEEKEND LISTENING, PLUS PIZZA: Local podcaster invites you to a taste test

April 7, 2018 8:18 pm
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 |   West Seattle news | West Seattle online | West Seattle people

Andrew Stuckey launched Podcast: West Seattle earlier this year, and is up to the third of his monthly installments – listen to it below:

This one bites into topics including West Seattle/White Center pizza, with a playoff of sorts. And he has an in-person event coming up, with an invitation for you – but a little bit about him first:

Andrew explains that his podcast isn’t a commercial enterprise:

I have lived in West Seattle for about 9 years (2005-2007 / 2012-Present). I taught high school English and Social Studies for 15 years, most recently at TAF Academy in Federal Way. I recently decided to change careers and go into audio production, and this podcast project is an excuse to go through the process of telling stories in the audio medium. Essentially the podcast is practice for a job I hope to have some day, and hopefully some of the segments will be portfolio-worthy. I created the format because it allows me to practice telling the types of stories I want to tell while satisfying some intellectual curiosity about the fascinating neighborhood we live in.

He adds, “You can subscribe on iTunes by searching for Podcast: West Seattle.” (You’ll find the first two on SoundCloud, too.)

Now, the in-person event (which is also on the WSB West Seattle Event Calendar): 5-6 pm on Tuesday, April 17th, stop by Beveridge Place Pub (6413 California SW) to help decide the pizza-tournament winner. Listen to his podcast to see how the field of 16 got narrowed down!

MISSING: Have you seen Kathleen?

FRIDAY, 9:25 PM: Friends and neighbors are trying to find out what happened to Kathleen, who they say hasn’t been seen at her Highland Park home for two weeks. Her disappearance is suspicious, explains her neighbor Grace, because Kathleen’s home appeared to have been ransacked and her dog left behind, with obvious signs of neglect. Grace says Kathleen “was considered our neighborhood vigilante,” in terms of watching out for crime and suspicious activity, and that she would never let a neighbor’s disappearance go unremarked on, so they’re trying to find out what happened to her. They say Kathleen worked at Home Depot but hadn’t been there for a few weeks. A police report has been filed, 2018-109928, so if you’ve seen Kathleen or have any information about the circumstances of her disappearance, her friends hope you will call 911 and refer to that incident number. (We are not publishing Kathleen’s full name, as we have not heard from relatives, nor, Grace says, have neighbors.)

ADDED MONDAY MORNING: We just talked with Det. Mark Jamieson at SPD media relations, who talked with the detective assigned to the case after we inquired. He confirms what a family member says in the comment section, that at this point there is no indication of foul play (criminal activity); she was reported missing about two weeks ago and the case remains open.

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