White Center 501 results

The auction item you never realized you needed, and other reasons to be at White Center Food Bank’s Harvest Dinner

(Photos courtesy White Center Food Bank)

Could be the ultimate home decoration … a fire hydrant. It’s one of the auction items up for bids one week from tonight at this year’s Harvest Dinner and Auction benefiting White Center Food Bank, which serves part of West Seattle too. Here’s the reminder:

The White Center Food Bank’s 14th Annual Harvest Dinner & Auction fundraiser is October 20th from 6 PM – 10 PM at the Brockey Center at South Seattle College. The theme is “Back to Our Roots,” signifying the return of the WCFB auction back to its neighborhood after being in various venues the past few years.

Keeping with the theme, WCFB will have a former customer of the food bank share her story and what role the food bank played in her getting connected to achieve her personal and professional goals.

The food bank’s new Executive Director will address the audience, as will the board president and a local partner, CitySoil Farm.

Featured items in the Live Auction include a fire hydrant from KC Water District 20, Seattle’s “other” sports package, a week-long stay at a timeshare in Mexico or Florida, and a farm to table dinner for 12 at WCFB’s onsite Grow2Give Garden.

Tickets are $75. Get them here. Questions? Please email: auction@whitecenterfoodbank.org or call 206-717-2531.

P.S. Follow the ticket link to preview dozens of other auction items too!

Delridge RapidRide H Line: Open house announced

Last time we mentioned the now-set-for-2021 Delridge Route 120/RapidRide H Line transition, an upcoming open house was noted. Today, details were announced – one week from tonight, Wednesday, October 10th, 5:30-7:30 pm. The event announcement from SDOT – which is partnering with Metro on the project going back to when it was under the “Delridge Multimodal Corridor” umbrella, since the transition will also “redesign” much of Delridge – includes:

In the Delridge corridor, we are proposing:

Bus lanes
Landscaped medians
Crosswalk improvements
Protected bike lanes and neighborhood greenway connections
Signal upgrades
Paving
Water and sewer pipe upgrades
Spot parking and bike lane removal
Public art

Learn more and give specific feedback about this early design work at our upcoming open house with King County Metro.

Attend our open house: Wednesday, October 10 – 5:30 to 7:30 PM
Mount View Elementary School
Cafeteria/Multi-Purpose Room
10811 12th Ave SW, Seattle
*Child care provided

For more information about the open house, please click here to see our postcard.

Stay tuned for an online open house with survey questions if you can’t make the event. Check out our website and keep an eye out for additional email updates from us to learn about additional opportunities to review the preferred option and provide feedback.

If you’re not on the e-mail list already, send a note to DelridgeTransit@seattle.gov. We first reported back in July that the H Line launch date had been pushed back to 2021.

UPDATE: White Center/North Burien power outage

7:01 AM: Thanks for the tips. Yet another big power outage in the area – this time, 4,000-plus customers in White Center/North Burien. No word yet on the cause. But if you’re heading that way this morning, you should be aware. P.S. As far as we can tell, no overlap with the areas affected by the two big West Seattle outages in the past week and a half.

8:27 AM: The map shows it’s over.

8:32 AM: City Light says this outage was caused by a tree branch falling into a power line.

Crime Watch: Stolen gray 4Runner

August 6, 2018 3:59 pm
|    Comments Off on Crime Watch: Stolen gray 4Runner
 |   Crime | West Seattle news | White Center

From Tim, a stolen-vehicle report: “Gray Toyota 4Runner ’99 SUV. Washington plates 231XWQ. Also: Black brush guard on the front end. Stolen Saturday night, 98th and 17th SW. Please call 911 if you see it!”

White Center Mary’s Place shelter latest beneficiary of West Seattleite’s project Libraries for All

(Photo by Andrea Laughery)

By Judy Pickens
Special to West Seattle Blog

Fresh paint, matching furniture, and planned décor are not the norm for families traumatized by homelessness. Those fortunate enough to find shelter get accustomed to make-do accommodations.

Not so the new library at the Mary’s Place shelter in White Center. It’s bright, comfortable, and inviting – whether a parent wants to read to her kids, enjoy a book himself, use a computer, or simply take a break to rewind.

A busy week of painting, assembling, and stocking culminated this past Saturday when the third Libraries for All project opened to Mary’s Place residents. Spearheaded by high-school senior Alina Guyon, a West Seattle resident, the project attracted help from several other volunteers, plus donations of books and laptops. The $5,250 in funding for expenses came from All the Sky Foundation.

Mary’s Place had an assortment of children’s books when Alina offered to create a real library. Starting with donated books (many from West Seattle), Alina enhanced the 250-square-foot room with computers so residents can search for jobs and stay connected with key people in their lives. The emphasis on children now includes kid-friendly DVDs.

“When families are trying to survive, education is set aside until the most pressing things in life are figured out and this break in a child’s education can create a long-term problem,” Alina said. “Having access to a library can help that child step back into school and stay at grade level.”

The 24-hour White Center Mary’s Place opened in June 2017 with a capacity of 70 adults and children. It is one of four full-service family centers that the nonprofit operates in the greater Seattle area.

(Photo by Alina Guyon)

Mary’s Place residents and members of Girl Scout Troop #40890 (photo above) helped stock the shelves with about 1,000 well-organized books. Knowing that loss and damage are inevitable, Libraries for All will replenish the supply as needed. The Mary’s Place staff will manage the library, use the projector to show movies, and maintain the computers.

The first Libraries for All project was for residents of a refugee facility near Kampala, Uganda, and the second was for children in a red-light district of Kolkata, India. Alina is weighing options for Project #4. Read more at libraries4all.com.

Now with its greatly enlarged collection of books, White Center Mary’s Place has put out a call for volunteers willing to read with children. To learn more, email volunteer@marysplaceseattle.org or call 206-621-8474.

Full Tilt Ice Cream founders look back, and ahead, on 10th-anniversary eve

By Tracy Record
West Seattle Blog editor

Ten years, five shops, two kids.

It’s been an eventful decade for Justin Cline and Ann Magyar since they opened the doors of Full Tilt Ice Cream in White Center on June 20, 2008 – where their tenth anniversary party is (updated) set for Saturday.

Yes, this level of success and expansion – including more than 200 wholesale outlets around the Northwest – surprised them. “We didn’t have a business plan,” admits Justin, who now spends more time business-running than ice-cream-making.

“We never would have opened if we’d had a business plan!” laughs Ann, wrangling their 15-month-old daughter Ruby as we talk at a table in the original store, which still sports the lemon-lime paint we remember from photographing it pre-opening.

Read More

RESTAURANTS: Pizza-mania spreads south, with Southside Pizza

This is both a closure and coming-soon tidbit from White Center: CTO, aka “Chinese Takeout,” has closed in the Beer Star/Lil’ Woody’s building at 16th SW/SW 98th – but the space won’t be empty for long. The CTO webpage announces, “Beginning on Monday, June 25th, we will be opening Southside Pizza, featuring whole pies, slices, and pizza joint classics that will have something for the whole family. Chef Manny is bringing his years of working with pizza to White Center and we’re excited about this new beginning.” Southside has menu info (minus pricing) on its in-progress website.

FOLLOWUP: Highland Park Action Committee, North Highline Unincorporated Area Council voice disappointment at Camp Second Chance extension

We published the city Human Services Department‘s announcement of another year for Camp Second Chance shortly after receiving it on Thursday afternoon. Since then, the two community councils closest to the sanctioned encampment – the Highland Park Action Committee and North Highline Unincorporated Area Council – have sent HSD interim director Jason Johnson this expression of disappointment:

The neighborhoods of Highland Park and the various neighborhoods comprising the unincorporated urban area of North Highline are extremely disappointed to hear that the City of Seattle has extended the permit for Camp Second Chance for an additional 12 months at the Myers Way Parcels (Fiscal and Administrative Services PMA #4539-4542). With this extension, the camp will have effectively been present at the current site for 2 years and 8 months, easily exceeding the allowed 2 year stay duration for encampments as outlined in Seattle Municipal Code Section 23.42.056, subsection E.1.

Camp Second Chance established itself on the Myers Way Parcels on July 23, 2016 (“Myers Way Parcels,” 2016), 10 days after former mayor Edward B. Murray declared that the property would be retained by the City of Seattle for the purposes of expanding the Joint Training Facility and for expanding recreational space (“Mayor Murray announces,” 2016). Polly Trout of Patacara Community Services—the organization which would become the sponsor for the camp—is reported to have used bolt cutters to break the lock on the fence that had been securing the property (Archibald, 2017a), thereby allowing the group of campers, who had defected from SHARE Tent City 3 earlier that year (Archibald, 2017b), to trespass and establish their new camp. The status of the camp remained in limbo for some time thereafter.

In a post on her blog concerning a possible eviction of the camp, Seattle City Council member Lisa Herbold (2016), who represents the district in which the camp is located, relayed that she had “urged the Executive [branch of city government] not only to have its work guided by established public health and safety prioritization criteria, but…asked whether outreach workers have the ability to ask for more time if – in their estimation – more time would help get campers access to services.” Seattle City Council member Sally Bagshaw and King County Council member Jean Kohl-Welles, who are not representatives of the area where the camp is located, had requested from Mayor Murray that the camp not be immediately evicted (Jaywork, 2016). Within 5 months of the camp’s establishment on the Myers Way property, the Murray administration proceeded to officially sanction the encampment (“West Seattle Encampment,” 2016), thereby delaying the community’s request to have the Myers Way Parcels relinquished to the Parks and Recreation department for future development of the site in accordance with community wishes.

I want to make clear that the communities surrounding the encampment are not strangers to disadvantage. Our neighborhoods have suffered from a lack of investment going back at least a century, and from redlining in the 1930s. The lasting effects of this lack of investment in our neighborhoods are palpable to this day!

Data from the American Community Survey (5-year Series, 2009-2013) show that Highland Park (Census Tract 113) has a lower median income ($53,182) and a higher proportion of residents who identify as a race or ethnicity other than White (49.8%) than Seattle as a whole ($65,277 and 29.4%, respectively). The King County census tract immediately to the South of Highland Park, which encompasses the land area where the Myers Way Parcels are located, shows even starker demographic departures from Seattle.

Census Tract 265 overlays the southeastern-most portion of Highland Park in the City of Seattle, as well as a portion of White Center, which is part of the North Highline unincorporated urban area. There, the proportion of residents who identify as a race or ethnicity other than White increases to 60.1%, while the Median Household Income drops to $35,857.

Like most Seattleites, residents of our neighborhoods are compassionate and wish to address the homelessness crisis with empathy. However, in as much as the City claims to promote equity, we ask that neighborhoods like ours not continue to be overwhelmed with the responsibility of shouldering the burden of the City’s homelessness policies while wealthier, less diverse neighborhoods remain largely unscathed.

Over the past decade, Highland Park has hosted three encampments and served as a staging area for a proposed safe lot for individuals residing in recreational vehicles. This burden has impacted not only our neighborhood, but the neighborhoods immediately south of us along the city limit. No other neighborhood in Seattle has willingly or unwillingly taken on as much and to the same extent!

Given this history, the Highland Park Action Committee (HPAC) has sought resolution from the Human Services Department on a number of items, including

1) The adoption of a set of best practices (manifested as our “Neighborhood Protocols for Sanctioned Encampments” which have been provided to the department on many past occasions and are again enclosed below) by which the City of Seattle will abide prior to sanctioning an encampment in any given neighborhood.

2) That the Finance and Administrative Services Department accelerate the relinquishment of the Myers Way Parcels to the Department of Parks and Recreation.

3) A plan resolving jurisdictional issues that arise from the presence of sanctioned and unsanctioned encampments at the interface of city, unincorporated county, and state land.

4) A 10% increase in the number of police officers assigned to the Southwest Precinct Patrol to help mitigate the increased burden on our current resources. (At 124 Full-Time Equivalents for budget year 2018, the Southwest Precinct Patrol Budget Control Level is the lowest in the city.)

Despite a reply on April 18 from Catherine Lester, the previous director of the Human Services Department, the Highland Park Action Committee does not feel that our requests have been satisfactorily addressed. We understand that some of our requests will require coordination with other departments. However, it is our belief that the City needs to take a holistic approach to its encampment-sanctioning process. To date, the methods employed have lacked transparency and eroded neighborhood trust in city government.

In an effort to allow residents of Highland Park and surrounding neighborhoods to get a better understanding of the City of Seattle’s homelessness response, the Highland Park Action Committee invites the Director of the Human Services Department (whomever that may be at the time) to attend our scheduled meeting on September 26, 2018 at 7:00 p.m. PDT for a moderated discussion on homelessness policy.

We kindly ask for confirmation of acceptance or declination of this request by August 17, 2018.

Sincerely,

Charlie Omana
Chair, Highland Park Action Committee

Liz Giba
President, North Highline Unincorporated Area Council

Highland Park’s decade-long history with encampment goes back to the first camp that called itself “Nickelsville,” which was evicted from public land at Highland Park Way and West Marginal Way SW less than a week after it set up in September 2008.

VIDEO: Music and merriment in the street as HONK! Fest West takes over White Center

2 PM: A day full of fun continues with the street-band festival HONK! Fest West taking over the heart of downtown White Center for the rest of the day, until 6 pm. We previewed it here last month – you might recall the festival’s day in The Junction back in 2010. Today, 16th SW is closed between Roxbury and SW 98th, with “stage” areas at either end, plus another one on 98th (closed between 15th and 17th) east of 16th.

The band list and map are on the HONK! Fest West home page. You will also find lineup boards by each stage – bands coming up range from Garfield HS musicians to the Seahawks’ famed Blue Thunder. Get down here – it’s all free.

8:05 PM: A few more photos:

And in case you missed Garfield – we had video in this tweet on our @whitecenternow feed:

WCN is also where we’re adding even more photos and video. Meantime, the third and final day of HONK! Fest West is tomorrow in Columbia City; day one, Friday, was in Georgetown.

Remember HONK! Fest West in WS? It’s coming to WC next month

(Reader photo from April 2010 HONK! Fest West in West Seattle)

Back in April 2010, there was a glorious day of dancing and music in the streets, with an eccentric edge, as HONK! Fest West came to West Seattle. In the ensuing years, the street festival of wild-and-often-wacky marching musicians has visited other neighborhoods in the city but hasn’t been back here. Next month, though, it’ll be close – HONK! Fest West bands (the list is now online) will spend the festival’s second day on the streets of White Center, 1-6 pm Saturday, June 2nd. It’s free, it’s unpredictable, and you’re invited to drop by for part of it or all of it. (We have a bit more background in our recent White Center Now coverage of a festival briefing for the North Highline Unincorporated Area Council.)

HAPPENING NOW: Post-Garage Sale Day donation dropoffs

May 12, 2018 3:19 pm
|    Comments Off on HAPPENING NOW: Post-Garage Sale Day donation dropoffs
 |   Community Garage Sale Day | How to help | West Seattle news | White Center

West Seattle Community Garage Sale Day is many things – among them, a boon to local nonprofits who welcome leftovers:

NORTHWEST CENTER’S BIG BLUE TRUCK: Open late tonight in The Junction for post-WSCGSD donations! 4718 44th SW, dropoff until 6:30 pm. Please bag/box items. Check out their list of what they’ll accept, or schedule a residential pickup for this coming week, at bigbluetruck.org.

STUFF THE TRUCK AT HOLY ROSARY: They’re collecting unwanted items again this year, 42nd/Genesee, to help fund programs to help neighbors in need. Most-needed items: Clothing, books, men’s jeans, shorts and shoes, and women’s business clothing. (No furniture, mattresses or beds, please.)

Look for the truck in the HR parking lot off 42nd SW north of SW Genesee until 5 pm.

STOP N SHOP AT THE SENIOR CENTER OF WEST SEATTLE: Taking “small household items and clothing” today until 4 pm – drop off in the carport on the east side of the building (4217 SW Oregon).

And to the south:

WHITE CENTER HEIGHTS ELEMENTARY: A donation drive with a special early drop-off date for WSCGSD:

White Center Heights Elementary PTA is partnering with Value Village for our first-ever Donation Drive Fundraiser Wed. May 30 – Mon. June 18, with a special early drop-off date on Sat. May 12 during West Seattle Community Garage Sale Day — so sellers can get rid of what’s left and buyers can make room for new treasures.

Every pound of your unwanted stuff turns into funds for uniforms, supplies and community activities benefiting White Center Heights students, teachers and families.

Early Donation Drop-Off
Sat. May 12, 3 PM-6 PM at White Center Heights Elementary School Parking Lot (10015 6th Ave SW)

Regular Donation Drop-Off
Wed. May 30 – Mon. June 18, Noon-10PM at Full Tilt Ice Cream (9629 16th Ave SW, Seattle, WA 98106)
* For large amounts of donations, please contact us at the info below so we can accommodate.

What We Can Take
Clothing, shoes, bedding, towels, accessories (e.g., hats, mittens, scarves, ties, socks, purses, wallets, backpacks, bags, belts, jewelry)
Small household items (e.g., electronics, toys & games, kitchen items, knick-knacks, sporting goods)
Books and media (e.g., CDs, DVDs)
Please put soft items in trash bags and hard/heavy items in boxes.

Questions? Contact Us
If you have any questions, can’t make the drop-off times or have a lot of donations, please call/text 206-992-6506 or email wchpta@gmail.com.

Anybody else? E-mail us – westseattleblog@gmail.com – and we will add.

CAN YOU HELP? Teacher needs a boost from a builder

An unusual request landed in the WSB inbox, from Shoshanna Cohen:

I am a sixth-grade teacher at White Center Heights Elementary. My students are planning an entire S.T.E.A.M. Carnival for the entire school of 750 students. On May 16th we want to have a building/cutting party at the school from 1-3:30 pm. We have all the materials already donated. We are looking for anyone who knows anything about construction/building and could help support my students in building everything from a remote control car obstacle course to a gigantic Plinko board to a life size Angry Birds Launcher.

Can you help? E-mail Shoshanna at shoshanna.cohen@highlineschools.org if you can, or if you have questions.

FOLLOWUP: Opening day for Brass Knuckle Bistro – with a free sample

Elvis would love the opening-day samples at Brass Knuckle Bistro, the White Center restaurant just opened by a West Seattle family (we first introduced you to them back in August). As noted here a week and a half ago, today is indeed the first official day for the sandwiches/salads/sides eatery at 9602 16th SW, open until 8 pm. See more photos on our partner site White Center Now.

CRIME WATCH: White Center double-murder suspect in jail

8:39 PM: Our routine check of the King County Jail roster tonight shows the current list of inmates includes Merle Buchanan, who’s been wanted for weeks in connection with the double murder in White Center two months ago. The King County Sheriff’s Office announced on January 25th that they were looking for him, almost three weeks after the shooting deaths. He was booked on Friday afternoon, according to the jail register, with bail set at $1.1 million – including $100,000 for a domestic-violence-related warrant. Court records show he is not yet charged in the shooting deaths.

11:18 PM: We asked KCSO’s public-information officer Sgt. Ryan Abbott for more details. He says Buchanan turned himself in to Seattle Police. He is expecting more information on Monday, which is also when we’ll be checking with the King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office to follow the case through the courts.

BIZNOTE: Brass Knuckle Bistro sets the opening date

Almost six months ago, we told you about a West Seattle family’s plan to open Brass Knuckle Bistro in the former 3.14 Bakery space on the north end of downtown White Center (9602 16th SW). Now they’ve announced that March 6th will be the opening date. BKB will focus on sandwiches – see the menu online. (Thanks to Gill for the tip!)

THE WHEEL THING: Rainier Roller Girls’ next bout rolls into Southgate on Saturday

(Photo by Steve Messerer)

Southgate Roller Rink – right next door in White Center – has made our area a hotspot for roller derby, for all ages, not just spectators, but skaters. It’s where the Rainier Roller Girls‘ new season is under way, with monthly “high-energy, all-ages-themed bouts” at Southgate. And they want to make sure you know what they’re all about. Rainier Roller Girls “are an all-female flat-track roller-derby league … a small competitive travel team made of 20-plus active skaters, retired skaters, and volunteers. We believe all is possible with a little elbow grease, an amazing support system, and loyal fans.” They launched in 2011 and are a “skater-owned league” that’s focused “on fitness, mental game, and fun for both the skaters and fans.”

(Courtesy THM Photo)

This year’s lineup of bouts continues Saturday (February 17th) with “Flashback to the ’80s,” continuing March 24th with “Mortal Kom-bout,” April 21st with “Heathers vs. Mean Girls,” May 19th with “Superheroes vs. Villains,” and June 15th with “Adults-only Rocky Horror.” They add: “Spectators are strongly encouraged to dress for the theme!” You can buy your ticket in advance here. And bring $ for the bake sale! P.S. – Rainier Roller Girls are recruiting, too:

Are you a veteran skater thinking about moving leagues, or a newer skater ready to league up? A referee or non-skating official looking for more experience or to share your love of derby? Rainier Roller Girls is always looking for new skaters, refs, and officials to join our ranks. Email info@rainierrollergirls.com to get in touch with us and for more information.

UPDATE: Helicopter, ground search after woman stabbed in White Center

8:11 PM: Thanks for the tips about Guardian One over White Center/South Delridge. We have a crew on the ground talking with deputies. So far, we’re told they are investigating an assault in WC. Will add other details when we get them.

8:28 PM: Just talked with KCSO spokesperson Sgt. Cindi West. She says a woman who works for a veterinary clinic in the 9800 block of 15th SW was stabbed and they were looking for her attacker. She apparently was attacked when she went out behind the clinic after thinking she heard someone crying. The attacker is described only as white, female, “skinny,” and possibly a transient. No one in custody so far.

9:25 PM:
Sgt. West told us the victim was injured in the abdomen and arm but was in stable condition when taken to the hospital and is expected to fully recover.

DOUBLE-MURDER SUSPECT: Have you seen Merle ‘Chucky’ Buchanan?

11:44 AM: Just published on our partner site White Center Now: The King County Sheriff’s Office is looking for 26-year-old Merle “Chucky” Buchanan, suspected in the January 6th double murder in downtown White Center, and shared these photos, saying he is “known to frequent” Seattle, Burien, and Renton:

Buchanan is described as 5’9” and 195 pounds. He is also being sought in connection with violating a domestic-violence-related court order. If you see him, call 911.

1:11 PM: We checked with the King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office, and they tell us Buchanan is not yet formally charged in the murders.

RAPIDRIDE H LINE: What was shown in Burien tonight, and will be in White Center tomorrow

January 10, 2018 10:21 pm
|    Comments Off on RAPIDRIDE H LINE: What was shown in Burien tonight, and will be in White Center tomorrow
 |   Delridge | Transportation | West Seattle news | White Center

We stopped by the first RapidRide H Line drop-in meeting in Burien tonight to preview what you’ll see if you go to the White Center meeting tomorrow. It’s classic open-house format – informational boards around the room, staffers there so you can ask questions, maps on tables, comment forms to fill out if you choose to. They include explanations of how RapidRide works, as well as focusing in on specifics of this project, which is scheduled to convert Route 120 into the H Line in 2020.

While there’s a separate meeting coming up in Delridge one week from tonight to talk about the new options for that stretch of the route, those boards are available too – ask if you don’t see them.

It’s not a different route, we were told, but rather some possibilities for where the stops will be – which has been a major concern in previous community discussions. The new Delridge option – they started with two and now this is #3 – would include stations at Genesee, Andover, Hudson, Findlay in the north, for example. (Andover would eventually be a connection at/near the future Sound Transit Light Rail stop.) For those who have been advocating to have RapidRide H use the Delridge/Barton triangle stop, that’s still not considered an option; Metro’s Jenna Franklin told us their projections suggest the Westwood area will have many more jobs by 2025 and the connection needs to be closer. The proposals include more than just bus-stop locations, but also multi-modal right-of-way improvements, so take a good look and be ready to discuss, especially at the Delridge meeting on January 17th (Youngstown Cultural Arts Center, 4408 Delridge Way SW), which starts as a drop-in event and then is followed by a discussion with the Delridge Neighborhoods District Council starting at 7 pm. (We also are scheduled for a more in-depth briefing on the proposal, so watch for a followup.)

Also note that tonight’s Burien meeting had materials in multiple languages and you’ll find those in White Center Thursday night, too (5-8 pm, Mount View Elementary, 10811 12th SW). And whether you do or don’t get to an in-person meeting, the “online open house” is open now too, linked from this info-laden page about the RapidRide H Line project – if you need it translated, look for the SET LANGUAGE button at lower left, which brings up a list of dozens of languages.

ON WHITE CENTER NOW: From Drunky’s Two Shoes to Dottie’s Doublewide

Just after Christmas, we reported on partner site White Center Now that a new enterprise from the folks behind Drunky’s Two Shoes was on its way to the space vacated by short-lived Zanzibar: Dottie’s Doublewide. We’ve finally been able to talk to the Dottie’s team for the full story, and published it on WCN tonight.

From White Center Now: Shooting investigation closes 16th SW

January 6, 2018 2:39 am
|    Comments Off on From White Center Now: Shooting investigation closes 16th SW
 |   Crime | West Seattle news | White Center

16th SW is closed in White Center between 98th and 100th after a double shooting (update: one confirmed dead), in the same area where a man was shot and killed eight months ago. We’re updating on partner site White Center Now as information becomes available.

NEW DATES: RapidRide H Line open houses in January

Metro has just set the new dates for its RapidRide H Line open houses next month – one in White Center, one in Burien:

Wednesday, January 10th from 5-8 p.m.
Burien Community Center, Shorewood Room
14700 6th Ave SW, Burien

Thursday, January 11th from 5-8 p.m.
Mount View Elementary School, Cafeteria/Multi-purpose Room
10811 12th Ave SW, White Center

These are the open houses promised when Metro went public three weeks ago with a survey asking you to get specific about feedback as they plan the conversion of Route 120 into the H Line – that survey is still open if you haven’t taken it yet.

WHITE CENTER: Advisory Council members sought for affordable-housing, family-resource project

We’re publishing this announcement both here and on partner site White Center Now because of the scope of the project:

The White Center Community Development Association (WCCDA), celebrating its 15th year serving White Center families with family/social services, small business/entrepreneurial development, school educational support, and family wellness, is partnering with Southwest Youth and Family Services (SWYFS), which provides critical health services to youth and families-at-risk, to create the White Center Neighborhood Advisory Council. This 20-person council, nominated from diverse segments of our White Center community, will meet twice a month, over five months in 2018, to assist us in the following;

*Review and plan for a Family Resource Center at the former White Center public health building site at 8th Ave. SW and SW 108th Ave, now temporarily used by Mary’s Place as transitional housing for homeless families.

*Develop a long-range affordable housing plan for White Center that helps keep White Center families living near each other, and incorporate the planning process findings into affordable housing at the former public health site

*Assist in ensuring that homeless transitional housing is considered as a continuing service in the affordable housing discussions for the site and elsewhere in White Center that will result.

The 20 members of this Council will receive $100 each in May of 2018, to compensate for their time serving on this council. The Nomination Form and Scope of Work for the Advisory Council can be found at the WCCDA website. All nominations are welcome, but we reserve the right to ensure that broad, diverse community perspectives are included through the nomination process as described in the Nomination Form and Scope of Work.

Nomination forms are due by December 12 at the CDA Open House meeting from 4-6 pm, that will be held at the WCCDA offices in the Technology Access Foundation building at 605 SW 108th Street. All nominees are encouraged to attend this meeting to meet staff, learn about the existing important work our staff do here in White Center, and eat good food. Child care will be provided.

Questions: Mark@WCCDA.ORG or call the WCCDA office at 206-694-1082