Pets 507 results

NEW AT WESTCREST PARK: Agility structures, thanks to Aidan McMahan’s Eagle Project & Troop 282

Something new at West Seattle’s only off-leash area, at Westcrest Park! Thanks to Kevin McMahan for the photos and report:

Aidan McMahan, along with other Scouts from his West Seattle Troop 282, installed three agility structures (Saturday) at Westcrest Dog Park as a part of his Eagle Project.

The structures are now open for business.

Special thanks to Westcrest Off-Leash Area, Coalition for Off-Leash Areas (C.O.L.A.), Alki Lumber, and Seattle Parks for their assistance in making this happen.

BIZNOTE: Camp Crockett unleashes expansion location in Burien

Need dog day camp, grooming, boarding to the south? Camp Crockett (WSB sponsor) has joined the parade of West Seattle businesses expanding into Burien. The announcement is from CC’s Vanessa Crevling:

We are proud to announce the Grand Opening of our second Camp Crockett location. We now offer day camp to pups in Burien!

This morning, at 7 am, the doors to our new camp officially opened! Our Burien camp is located at 626 SW 154th St., Burien. Telephone number is 206.708.1178.

Our new day camp offers 6,000 square feet of outdoor play area where the pups can run around and enjoy themselves. We also offer an indoor/outdoor play area with lots of cushions for tired campers and plenty of toys for everyone!

Grooming and boarding are two more services our new Burien location also offers.

It’s been two and a half years since Camp Crockett opened its West Seattle location in North Delridge.

WARM WEATHER WARNING: Don’t leave your pet in your car!

With the temperature expected to go into the 80s tomorrow, we’ve received notes from several readers worried about people endangering their pets by leaving them in cars, and asking us to share this seasonal reminder. One sent along this link with the numbers, including: “On an 85-degree day, it only takes 10 minutes for the inside of your car to reach 102 degrees.” Leaving the windows open an inch or two will NOT prevent the interior from getting dangerously hot.

Warning/reminder for dog owners: Sign seen at Alki Beach; city announces ’emphasis patrols’


(WSB photo)

ORIGINAL REPORT, 12:04 PM: Yes, the no-pets-on-the-beach law is enforced at Alki and other waterfront parks sometimes – and at least one citation recipient is unhappy about it. We took that photo this morning after someone called to tell us about the sign. A first-time violation will cost you $54, according to this list of city fines, which has the reminder that it’s “unlawful to permit any dog to run at large in any park, except in designated off-leash areas, OR unlawful to permit any dog to enter any public beach, swimming area or wading area, pond, fountain, stream, or organized athletic area.” We’re checking to see if Seattle Animal Shelter (aka “animal control”) has any stats on how many tickets it’s issued so far this year.

3:16 PM: Perhaps a coincidence, but while our information request to SAS has not yet been acknowledged, we received this news release from the city minutes ago:

Spring is blossoming and hatching in Seattle, and now is a particularly important time to ensure that immature wildlife have their best opportunity to flourish in the Northwest. Because of this, the Seattle Animal Shelter will be conducting emphasis patrols on all saltwater beaches in the city.

Dogs are not allowed on any of Seattle’s public saltwater beaches, whether leashed or unleashed. This law helps to protect the fragile ecosystem along our shorelines. Marine mammals, such as seal pups who are typically born in April, use the city’s beaches to rest and warm themselves. Shore birds also frequent our beaches. Wildlife that interact with dogs are less likely to reach adulthood.

Uniformed animal services officers will be patrolling city parks with a focus on saltwater beaches and may issue citations to violators.

If you would like to report Seattle beaches where dogs are frequently seen, please submit a service request here. You can also contact the shelter directly by calling 206-386-PETS (7387) or by visiting seattleanimalshelter.org.

3:44 PM: Our request for stats has been answered by Kara Main-Hester at Seattle Animal Shelter:

The Park District team started in 2016. Since the start of the program, they have written 905 violations and conducted 1002 patrols. (Data: 1/1/2016 – 3/31/2017). During that time, they wrote 29 citations at Alki parks (Alki Beach Park + Alki Playground) and 34 at Lincoln Park.

BIZNOTE: Last day for Admiral Veterinary Hospital

Just got this announcement that Admiral Veterinary Hospital (2231 California SW) is closing after today:

After 30 years, Dr. Don Shaffer has retired (a little earlier than expected – he had originally planned to retire in the fall). Cheryl, a vet assistant who has been at Admiral since 1989, wants to let everyone know that she’s been immensely happy to know and serve all the many cats & dogs (and one turtle) who have come in for treatment. Also, the many, many good people who are their parents. The office will still be open on a limited basis for clients to pick up copies of their records (for at least the first half of April). Please call for coordination of pick-up times at 206-937-4940 (please leave a message).

Ruth, who sent the notice, says she and Pam are retiring; Cheryl will be taking care of her grandson.

More off-leash areas? Seattle Parks Board to consider draft dog plan next week

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The pink dots are where the city has off-leash dog parks now – in West Seattle, for example, Westcrest Park is the only one. Will more be added – and if so, where? A key step toward deciding that could come next Thursday night, when the Seattle Parks Board discusses, and might vote on, the draft People, Dogs, and Parks Strategic Plan.

You can see documents for the meeting here – including the points that board members are being asked to decide on Thursday night, spelled out in this “decision agenda” memo. It includes proposed changes to the draft plan, and also asks the board to affirm whether new off-leash areas would only be fenced sites – ruling out “leash-optional trails.” And the board will be asked to affirm the plan’s proposed policies for regulating professional dog walkers if they use off-leash areas – with a $100 annual license and requirements for certification if they seek to bring more than three dogs to an OLA after the first two years following passage of the plan.

Ahead of next Thursday’s meeting, the group Citizens for Off-Leash Areas has been circulating a survey asking for more suggestions for “pilot” off-leash spots – find it here. The survey’s introduction says Seattle Parks asked the group to come up with more possible locations. We asked Parks if that was indeed how they were soliciting site suggestions, rather than putting out a call to the public. Spokesperson Christina Hirsch replied:

When the final People, Dogs and Parks Plan is released in March, it will outline a process for the public to submit applications for off-leash locations. This process will be open to all, including groups and individual residents. Seattle Parks and Recreation will form a committee to review the applications and the Superintendent will make the final decision. This process will go through a public involvement process and community outreach.

COLA has worked in collaboration with SPR during the Off-Leash Area Master Plan process. COLA came to SPR with a list of off-leash location recommendations and we suggested that they develop a more comprehensive and geographically balanced list. It appears they are developing that revised list by soliciting community feedback.

COLA’s recommendations will go along with submissions from the community application process.

In the meantime, Thursday night’s board meeting considering the strategic plan is open to the public – 6:30 pm January 12th, at Parks HQ downtown (100 Dexter Ave. N.).

WEST SEATTLE HOLIDAYS: ‘Wrap It Up’ with Furry Faces Foundation on Christmas Eve

December 20, 2016 4:37 pm
|    Comments Off on WEST SEATTLE HOLIDAYS: ‘Wrap It Up’ with Furry Faces Foundation on Christmas Eve
 |   Holidays | Pets | West Seattle news

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Expect to need help wrapping holiday gifts before Christmas? This year, you can get some help – Furry Faces Foundation is reviving its “Wrap It Up” fundraiser, newly added to our West Seattle Holiday Guide – or, if you would like to help others, you can volunteer:

Wrap It Up! With Furry Faces Foundation!
December 24th
Beveridge Place Pub
6413 California Ave SW
12 pm-6 pm

Have your Christmas gifts wrapped while watching the Seahawks game!

The elves of Furry Faces Foundation are looking forward to wrapping your gifts in splendor and uniqueness! We have gift wrap, bows, tape, ribbon, garland, pine cones, pipe cleaners, name tags, and more! It’s up to you how much you would like to donate for the gift wrapping with 100% of the proceeds going directly to helping animals stay with their people.

If you would like to give your time to help wrap, please email us at furryfaces@hotmail.com; or call 206-321-4729.

Please note that Beveridge Place Pub is 21+.

‘YAPPY HOUR’: Furry Faces Foundations plans party for people AND dogs

Go have fun without leaving your dog at home OR in the car! Just announced:

Furry Faces Foundation Announces our first ever Mutts ‘n Martinis… a yappy hour.

Get your cocktail attitude on and bring your dog! Local guest bartenders each feature their signature drink; delish noshes; dog bakery truck; dog games; two rescue groups; a dog ruff-le; silent auction; and more. You don’t have to bring a dog to attend…you just need to love dogs like we do.

Date: October 15th
Time: 4 pm – 7 pm
Location: Stay! Doggie Daycare & Boarding, 10027 14th Ave SW

Guest Bartenders from
-Smarty Pants Garage
-Whisky West
-OutWest

Two Local Rescue Groups
-Animal Aid & Rescue Foundation
-Emerald City Pet Rescue

Special Guests
-Cascade Heights Veterinary Center
-The Seattle Barkery – a food truck for dogs

Limited number of tickets, so buy yours ASAP. Dog tickets are $5 – buy here. Human tickets are $20 – buy here. If you’d rather buy in person, go to Pet Elements (6511 California SW), Wash Dog (6400 California SW), or Stay! (10027 14th SW).

P.S. Furry Faces says this is an indoor/outdoor event; ID required for humans “even if you are 95 years young”; and “dogs must be spay or neutered, dog-friendly, and up to date on vaccines, in order to partake.”

REMINDER: Seattle Parks dog-plan hearing Thursday

One last reminder in case this is an issue about which you feel strongly: Tomorrow night is the public hearing for the draft citywide People, Dogs, and Parks Strategic Plan. The citywide Board of Park Commissioners is presiding over the public hearing, 6:30 pm at Miller Community Center on Capitol Hill (330 19th Ave. E.). Here are the details, as first published in August on the Parks Department’s Parkways website; we first wrote about the draft plan when it was made public back in June, including the improvements it recommends for West Seattle’s only off-leash park, Westcrest Park in Highland Park.

P.S. If you can’t make it to the public hearing, you can comment via e-mail – send your thoughts to Rachel.Acosta@Seattle.Gov by October 14th.

Dogs-only swimming fundraiser in Arbor Heights next week

(WSB photo from 2015)
The only West Seattle swimming event of its kind is back next week at Arbor Heights Swim and Tennis Club! In case you haven’t seen it in the WSB West Seattle Event Calendar yet, here’s the heads-up:

Bring your furry friends for a swim in the AHSTC pool during the week after the club closes.

11003 31st Ave SW

Tuesday-Friday, September 20-23, 5-7 pm
Saturday, September 24, 11 am-1:00 pm

We have some new treats in store for the pups this year!

This is a fundraiser for AHSTC teams used to purchase big ticket items and helps us to keep our team fees down. Suggested donation is $10/dog for one day or $25/dog for a pass and come as many days as you want! Be sure to invite your friends!

Basic details: Dogs must be healthy, up to date on shots and well socialized. Humans are responsible for their dog’s behavior (and poop). Running on the pool deck is encouraged! No people in the poo,l but you will get wet so dress accordingly.

Thank you for supporting AHSTC teams!

If you haven’t heard about this event before – this is after the last swim of the year in the pool for PEOPLE, and before the pool gets its post-season cleaning, and again, it’s dogs-only, no people. Here’s our report from last year’s event.

UPDATE: Students’ annual bake sale benefiting animal advocacy

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Thanks to Andrea for the photo of Gwen and Muriel toward the start of their fourth annual Seattle Humane Society-benefiting bake sale – a tradition they started as fourth-graders! – now at the halfway point (scheduled to continue until 3 pm). Even if you’re not up for home-baked treats, you are also welcome to stop by and donate cat and/or dog food and/or toys, or $/checks for the Humane Society. Find them at 36th/Dakota (map).

5:44 PM UPDATE: From Andrea:

Huge thanks to the West Seattle community for their awesome support today! These dedicated young ladies raised $457 for the Seattle Humane Society through today’s bake sale!!>/blockquote>

More Seattle dog parks? See the city’s new draft Off-Leash Areas plan – ‘People, Dogs, and Parks’

(WSB file photo, Westcrest Off-Leash Area)

By Tracy Record
West Seattle Blog editor

Months later than first promised, the draft plan for Seattle Parks‘ off-leash areas is finally out today. See it here.

The process leading to this has been under way for almost a year – we mentioned a survey last July, and several local community councils included discussions at their meetings earlier this year.

We’ve just taken a quick read through the draft plan, and here are some of the points:

*No specific new off-leash areas are proposed

*A process for adding new OLAs “gradually” is outlined

*In the meantime, the city proposes spending up to $1.3 million to improve the 14 existing OLAs, through funding from the voter-approved Park District

Here’s the outline of the process suggested for adding new OLAs:

For each proposed OLA, except those involving private developers, SPR will convene a committee including dog advocates, environmental advocates, a veterinarian or animal behaviorist, community members, and SPR staff to recommend to the Superintendent whether the proposed OLA should move forward.

1 Adding OLAs through new park/redevelopment processes. SPR will specifically include OLAs as an element
for consideration in the planning process when SPR embarks on the development or redevelopment process
for new and existing parks, along with any other suggested use that arises during the process.

2 As SPR develops land-banked park sites, SPR will examine their use for new OLAs as part of the park
development process.

3 SPR will continue to consider adding new OLAs by request of the community, whether through
Neighborhood Matching Fund processes or other community processes.

4 Support groups such as COLA in developing OLAs on non-park public land suitable for OLAs, by convening
the committee described above and assisting with design.

5 Encourage groups like COLA to work with private property owners to provide OLAs on unused property.

6 Encourage private developers, through the Seattle Department of Construction and Inspection, to include
OLAs as part of prospective developments.

There will still remain the issue of development costs for any of these alternatives, but those can be addressed on a case-by-case basis.

The document says adding a one-acre off-leash area is estimated to cost just under $1 million.

As for the nature of improvements/additions, the draft plan includes these recommendations:

Based on the potential for conflict between leashed and unleashed dogs and between dogs and other park activities, limited enforcement resources, and feedback from other jurisdictions, SPR recommends continuing to offer fenced OLAs only.

*Based on the potential for conflict between leashed and unleashed dogs and between dogs and other trail users, the associated need for more maintenance and enforcement and the potential for disturbing animal and bird habitat, SPR does not recommend designated leash-optional trails.

*Based on the protection of many of Seattle’s beaches by the Marine Reserves Rule and the potential for disturbing animal, marine and bird habitat, SPR recommends against establishing any more OLAs with beach access.

We’re still reading through the rest of the plan and will add anything else of note in the next hour or so (again, see the full draft plan here). Geographically, it notes that a “small area of (north West Seattle)” is one of the parts of the city that does NOT have an off-leash area within 2.5 miles; West Seattle’s one and only OLA is at Westcrest Park in Highland Park, opened in 1997 and described in the draft plan as the second-busiest off-leash area in the city.

The Westcrest analysis starts on page 145 of the report and recommends these improvements:

1. Reinstall ADA parking sign and ADA path in small and shy dog area.
2. Upgrade fencing to protect natural areas.
3. Replace woodchips with other surfacing and fill in ruts.
4. Restore eroded slope.
5. Pave service road from the north lot entrance to the inside dumpster.

WHAT’S NEXT: The process for commenting on the draft plan is outlined here. A public hearing is set for July 28th in Northgate (that same link has full details), and the Seattle Parks Board is scheduled to vote at its September 8th meeting. Parks Superintendent Jesús Aguirre has the final say on the plan.

West Seattle schools: Taproot students’ study picks up where others … didn’t pick up

(Photo courtesy Michelle Taylor: Taproot students attend to a bag dispenser in Fauntleroy Park)

What Fauntleroy Creek/Watershed volunteers did in 2004 and 2008, students from Taproot School are doing now, according to watershed/creek steward Judy Pickens:

Continuing concern about pet waste left in Fauntleroy Park prompted students at Taproot School to take on the 2016 Poop Study.

The study documents the number and location of pet waste along a segment of trail in Fauntleroy Park that’s popular with dog walkers. After a baseline count earlier this spring, the students are reaching out to dog owners with information about why picking up after their pet is important and making compliance easy with free bags.

Located in the Fauntleroy Schoolhouse Community Center, Taproot School makes almost daily use of the park as an extension of classroom learning for its 27 (K-5) students. Run in 2004 and again in 2008, the study initiated by the Fauntleroy Watershed Council aims to reduce the level of fecal coliform bacteria that Fauntleroy Creek conveys into Puget Sound.

Students will do a second count in July and a third in September, then compile their report, with an emphasis on what more they recommend doing to get dog walkers to scoop.

SUNDAY: Play, bid, back animal advocates at Catsino

April 2, 2016 8:15 pm
|    Comments Off on SUNDAY: Play, bid, back animal advocates at Catsino
 |   How to help | Pets | West Seattle news

Tomorrow, you can help four animal-advocacy groups in one place at one fun event: Catsino, 2-6 pm Sunday at Beveridge Place Pub (6413 California SW). Just-for-fun game tables are always the main attraction, but you will find more than casino-style games – for example, organizer Teri Ensley from Furry Faces Foundation tells us, one table will feature Ventana Construction (WSB sponsor) dealing the famous Kickstarter-launched game Exploding Kittens. And at the silent auction, here are some of the items you can bid for:

· West 5: One year Mac ‘n’ Cheese Certificate
· West City Kitchen: $50 Gift Certificate
· Two T-shirts from Mariners Spring Training
· Fairmont Olympic Hotel: Afternoon Tea for Two
· Autographed Sounders Mini-soccer ball (super cool)!
· Bad Ass Barbecue

Ticket info and other details can be found here.

Dogs in city parks: What the new plan might and might not include

The city’s moving toward a new proposal for dogs in Seattle parks – and this Thursday night, the Seattle Parks Board of Commissioners will hear how Parks leadership is leaning.

That briefing document prepared for the Parks Board hints at what might be in the proposed People, Dogs, and Parks Strategic Plan, due out soon for public comment. It’s been a subject of discussion in several community meetings we’ve covered recently, starting with the Delridge District Council‘s meeting last November.

For one, the document says Superintendent Jesús Aguirre is NOT expected to call for “unfenced, (certain) hours-only” offleash periods in parks. It also says he’ll recommend limiting the number of dogs that can be brought to a park to three per person. And he’ll recommend that development of additional off-leash areas go “through regular new park development and/or existing park redevelopment processes.”

One more note from the briefing paper: “Beginning this month, there will be a two-person team, one Animal Control staff and one Parks and
Recreation staff, patrolling parks with the sole purpose of enforcing leash and scoop laws.”

The draft plan is now expected to be made public next month, with public meetings in April and May, and a final plan in June. Meantime, the board meeting this Thursday starts at 6:30 pm at Parks HQ downtown (100 Dexter Ave. N.).

FOLLOWUP: How Liberty the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever did at Westminster

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(WSB photo, February 6)

Back on February 6th, we brought you the story of West Seattleite Marcia Lyons and her Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever, Liberty, getting ready to head to the legendary Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show and the Masters Agility Championship preceding it. We noticed in today’s results that Liberty had received “select” honors in her breed category. So we e-mailed Marcia to ask for an update:

It has been an amazing but incredibly busy time in New York. Here’s a recap of the last couple days and Libby’s exploits at Westminster.

I am crazy proud of my little Liberty and her performance this weekend at Westminster. On Saturday she ran in the Masters Agility Championship. She ran well enough in the two daytime runs to make it into the top 10 of her height class (16″) which meant she made it into the final Championship that night. It was quite the spectacle, as it was televised nationally on Fox Sports. I was also one of the few selected to wear a special wireless microphone as I ran so they could hear everything I was saying to Libby as we ran. In the final round she ran beautifully and one of the fastest times of the evening, but unfortunately we made 2 errors that added time penalties so we didn’t win. But she was a winner in my book, the way she gave her all as she ran and held up through an incredibly crazy busy day.

To cap her agility success, today she displayed the beauty side of things to compliment her athletic achievements. In the dog show she went into the breed ring for Conformation, in the “Best of Breed” class. It was quite thrilling when the judge awarded her the “Select Female” prize, meaning she was his second highest pick out of the females. We are now heading home tired and happy with some lovely ribbons.

It was an amazing weekend for the little Toller from West Seattle.

We almost missed Liberty on the winners’ list because she was listed by her official name: CH Aqueus Let Freedom Ring CD BN RE AX AXJ OF CGC.

VIDEO: West Seattle dog to compete at Westminster; searching for room to run

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(WSB photos and video unless otherwise credited)

By Tracy Record
West Seattle Blog editor

One week from tonight, you might find yourself cheering for a West Seattle dog in a televised competition that precedes the legendary Westminster Kennel Club All Breed Dog Show in New York City.

Marcia Lyons tells WSB that she and Liberty, her 4-year-old Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever, are the only team from our state set to compete in the club’s 3rd annual Masters Agility Championship.

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After Marcia e-mailed us about Liberty, we asked if we could come meet her and see what she does. Marcia obliged, so there we were near their home on a sloped stretch of SW Juneau this morning:

In the original announcement we received from Marcia, the Agility Championship is described this way:

This event, which features some of the most talented K9 athletes in the country, will feature dogs and their handlers excitedly attacking an obstacle course of jumps, tunnels, weave poles, and more, racing against the clock. At Westminster, each dog will compete in two qualifying rounds. The ten dogs from each height class with the lowest combined scores will move on to the Championship round Saturday evening (February 13th), creating a field of 50 finalists competing for the coveted title of Westminster Kennel Club Masters Agility Champion. The Championship round will be televised on FOX Sports 1 beginning at 5:00 pm Pacific.

Liberty and Marcia also will be in the All-Breed Dog Show itself, which starts on Monday, February 15th, competing against other Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers – the smallest breed of retriever, Marcia explained. The evening finals will be that night 5-8 pm PT on CNBC and Tuesday, February 16th, same time slot, on USA Network.

marcialiberty
(Photo courtesy Marcia Lyons)

But first, next Saturday’s agility competition, which starts with daytime runs before the televised evening finals. Liberty, she says, is already fastest runner in her class, and she feels good about their chances at the championship, “as long as we run clean” – no mistakes.

Liberty is the first dog with whom she’s competed; she says they’re also working on “competitive obedience.”

The full schedule for the Masters Agility Championship and All-Breed Dog Show is here.

P.S. There’s one way you can help: If you look at our video again, you’ll notice Liberty running on a planting strip along a busy street. Marcia’s backyard isn’t quite big enough for proper training. They’re looking for a space in West Seattle that is large enough for them to practice, especially before they take off for the competition.

New timetable for ‘People, Dogs, Parks’ plan: Late February

What will be proposed in the city’s “People, Dogs, and Parks Strategic Plan” – formerly the off-leash plan? We won’t know for another month. That’s the latest word from the city; thanks to Mike Dey from the Fauntleroy Community Association for the alert. When the new project lead, Susan Golub, spoke to the Delridge Neighborhoods District Council in November (WSB coverage here), it looked like the draft plan would be out in early January. Now the city says “tentatively … late February.” You can watch this city webpage for updates – or be at the city Parks Board’s next meeting, as they have a “preliminary discussion” about the forthcoming plan. A briefing paper just posted in connection with that meeting offers these questions for Parks Board members to discuss:

1. Should we allow/encourage sponsorships and advertising? …

2. Should we have unfenced, hours-only off-leash areas? …

3. How should new OLAs be added to the system? …

4. Should there be a restriction on the number of dogs an individual can bring to an off-leash area?

The Parks Board meets 6:30 pm next Thursday (January 28th) at Queen Anne Community Center. No dog-plan-specific meeting dates/times are set yet

ADOPT A PET IN 2016! You can start at today’s West Seattle Farmers’ Market

As mentioned in the daily preview, the West Seattle Farmers’ Market is on, and we found special guests today at the south end (California/Alaska):

This 8-year-old kitty was looking especially regal, awaiting adoption:

If you miss MaxMobile today (there until 2 pm), two more West Seattle visits are on the calendar for this monthPet Pros at Westwood Village on January 15 from 2 pm to 5 pm, Mud Bay in Admiral (2611 California SW) on January 23 from 11 am to 2 pm.

West Seattle Crime Watch update: Gus the dog found after theft of car he was in

1:16 PM: That’s Gus, and he’s in West Seattle Crime Watch as well as on the Lost/Found Pets page because we’ve received a reader report that he was inside a car stolen near The Junction this morning. The car is a 2003 silver Infiniti FX 35, license plate ALL9711. Gus is half Pomeranian, half Brussels Griffon. Please call John or Laura if you find him – 206.935.3525 or 206.948.8540. And call 911 if you see the car.

2:19 PM: Per commenters, Gus has been spotted in the Fairmount Park/Fairmount Springs area.

3:40 PM UPDATE: Found!

SUNDAY EVENING P.S. Happy-ending photo, forwarded by John and Laura’s friend Madeleine, who sent the original info about the theft.

John also e-mailed us to thank WSB readers: “Thanks to the Blog we found him. It worked like an Amber Alert. His first sighting was near the Morgan Junction, and I finally found him near Admiral and 50th Ave SW.”

West Seattle holiday scene: ‘Santa Paws’ and ‘Nomads’ pals

December 12, 2015 12:00 pm
|    Comments Off on West Seattle holiday scene: ‘Santa Paws’ and ‘Nomads’ pals
 |   Holidays | Pets | West Seattle news

Who in this photo’s been naughty and who’s been nice? Up to “Santa Paws” to find out. Thanks to Bethany from Cascadian Nomads for sharing the photo of her canine friends’ adventure in The Junction, where – as previewed on our daily list – you can get a free professional Santa photo at West Seattle Windermere until 1 pm. (4525 California SW)

WEDNESDAY: City’s dogs-in-parks plan @ Delridge District Council

If you’re interested in the city’s policies regarding off-leash dogs in parks – whether you think current policies are too lenient, too tough, or just right – you’ll be interested in this Wednesday’s Delridge Neighborhoods District Council meeting. The agenda includes a discussion of the People, Dogs, and Parks Strategic Plan (previously called the Off-Leash Area Strategic Plan) that’s under development, with a draft plan to go public in early January. Scheduled guests include reps from Seattle Parks and from the Seattle Nature Alliance. The under-development plan was a topic at last week’s Fauntleroy Community Association meeting, as reported here. The DNDC meets at 7 pm Wednesday (November 18th) at Youngstown Cultural Arts Center, 4408 Delridge Way SW.

P.S. If you can’t be there, the city is also taking comments via this form.

HAPPENING NOW: Cat adopt-a-thon featuring Katya and friends at High Point Community Center

Some of the cats and kittens at the Seattle Animal Shelter Cat Adopt-A-Thon at High Point Community Center were snapped up fast. But Katya, 10, above, didn’t have a forever home yet as of about 15 minutes ago. Go see her and the others looking for new homes.

HPCC is at 6920 34th SW and this is on until 3 pm. There’s even a tent where you can get acquainted with your potential new furry family member.

(That’s Bowser the kitten.)

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