West Seattle people 2036 results

Clay Eals, first-ever Southwest Seattle Historical Society executive director, announces he’s leaving

He’s the man who literally wrote the book on West Seattle history, and for the past 4+ years, he has been the main cheerleader for appreciating, stewarding, celebrating, exploring, and recording it. Today,Clay Eals has announced he’ll be making way for someone else – not yet hired – to lead the Southwest Seattle Historical Society. Here’s the news release:

The Southwest Seattle Historical Society soon will seek a new executive director to succeed heritage advocate Clay Eals, who has resigned after four-and-a-quarter years in the position.

In a letter to the organization’s board, Eals wrote that his decision to step down stems from “a desire to spend more time focusing on other aspects of my life.”

His departure will be effective in mid-July. The board plans to begin advertising for the full-time position later this month and hopes to fill the position in time for the successor to overlap with Eals, who has been involved with the historical society since its founding in 1984.

Eals became the historical society’s first executive director in January 2013. He expressed gratitude for the opportunity, adding that he is confident that the organization’s mission, track record and board leadership will result in continued organizational success.

The author, historian and ex-journalist wrote in his resignation letter that the timing of the transition would be “as good as it gets” for the organization.

“We just finished a huge phase of our Junction landmark campaign, and between now and mid-July several manageable events (including the Sea View Hall home tour) can be pulled off while attention is devoted to a hiring process,” he wrote. “Most important is that there is enough time to get a new executive director on board to become immersed in the planning and execution of our 2017 Champagne Gala Brunch.”

As executive director, Eals has seen himself as a pied piper, bringing together members, volunteers, donors, sponsors and community leaders to achieve and monitor landmark status for iconic buildings, assemble Group Hug photo events featuring school children and others at key sites, champion programs and collections of the organization’s “Birthplace of Seattle” Log House Museum, deepen relations with the Duwamish Tribe, create and sustain two monthly speaker series, revive the historical society’s annual “If These Walls Could Talk” home tours, broaden the organization’s visibility, and deepen its financial viability.

Primary responsibilities of the position are fundraising, outreach, volunteer recruitment, staff supervision and overall management. In addition to the full-time position of executive director, the historical society has two paid part-time staff positions of curator and museum operations coordinator.

“We will so miss Clay in his departure from our organization,” says Karen Sisson, who became board president of the historical society in January.

“We have appreciated the guidance Clay has shown us,” she says. “Clay has left us in such a better place than when he came to the organization, so now we are able to take what he has given us, build on that solid ground and reach for the stars! We wish him well with his ventures and will welcome his involvement with us in the future as a seasoned volunteer.”

For more information on the search for a new executive director, please contact Karen Sisson at 206-579-0126 or karensisson12@gmail.com.

(Photo credit: Joanne Murray)

Eric Galanti, former owner of two West Seattle businesses, sentenced for tax evasion

3 PM: Just in from the regional U.S. Attorney’s Office:

The former owner of three bars and restaurants in the Seattle area was sentenced today in U.S. District Court in Seattle to eight months in prison, one year of supervised release, and $800,000 in restitution for multiple misdemeanor counts of failing to file tax returns, announced U.S. Attorney Annette L. Hayes.

Eric M. Galanti, 41, who now resides in Olympia, failed to file his business and personal tax returns between 2006 and 2012. Galanti owned several restaurants during that time including Alki Crab & Fish in West Seattle, the Admiral Pub in West Seattle, and Bourbon Jacks (aka Poppas Pub or Charlies Pub) in Kent.

At the sentencing hearing, U.S. District Judge Richard A. Jones said Galanti “enjoyed the lifestyle of the ‘rich and famous,’… but every single year when April 15th rolled around a light had to come on that you owed taxes…. This was a flagrant and ongoing offense.”

According to records filed in the case, the lengthy investigation by the Internal Revenue Service Criminal Investigation Division found that Galanti’s businesses were generating significant revenues, but he failed to keep accurate records. Bank records show two of the restaurants had deposits of more than $7.7 million between 2006 and 2011. While he failed to file and pay his taxes, Galanti enjoyed a lavish lifestyle: using forged tax documents to facilitate his purchase of a $400,000 yacht; taking expensive trips to Hawaii, Las Vegas, and the Caribbean; and paying more than $10,000 for Kenny Chesney concert tickets.

“As we approach tax day, Mr. Galanti’s sentence reminds us of our legal obligation to file complete and accurate tax returns with the IRS. Today, Mr. Galanti, who willfully failed to pay $800,000 in taxes, learned the consequences of neglecting his duty as an American and as a small business owner,” stated Special Agent in Charge Darrell Waldon of IRS Criminal Investigation. “Instead of paying taxes, Mr. Galanti rewarded himself with lavish vacations and a new yacht. His decision to ignore his civic responsibilities caught up with him today.”

The case was investigated by the Internal Revenue Service Criminal Investigation (IRS-CI). The case was prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney Norman Barbosa.

We have a request out for documents in the case. You might recall that one of the named local establishments, Alki Crab and Fish, closed five years ago after losing the Seacrest Boathouse concession space to Marination.

3:40 PM: After reading through additional documents provided on request by the U.S. Attorney’s Office, here’s what else we have learned: The sentence follows a plea agreement reached in January, related to an indictment from March 2016. In the plea agreement, Galanti pleaded guilty to five counts of failure to file corporate tax returns. In the defense memo prepared for the sentencing hearing, it’s noted that Galanti gave up running his own businesses in 2015 and went back to working for his father, and is living with his parents in Olympia.

‘Rock the House’: West Seattle event April 27 for ‘all who support a dementia-friendly community’

Are you dealing with memory loss – or related to/friends with someone who is? You’ll want to plan to be at this social gathering in West Seattle later this month:

People with memory loss, their family and friends, and all who support a dementia-friendly community are invited to attend a fun social gathering called “Rock the House.” Organized by local business owners, organizations, and neighbors, the event takes place from 3 – 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 27, at Shadowland in the West Seattle Junction.

Along with a chance to enjoy food, drinks, and good company, the event features MC Brent Amaker (of Brent Amaker and The Rodeo) and live music by Jay Cates (of The Bend). Happy-hour menu will be available. Event is free other than the cost of menu items ordered.

“I’m excited about this because I love to get people together, especially people in different situations,” says Frances Smersh [WSB photo at right], who helped plan the event. “It’s a wonderful opportunity to engage people and have a great time. And music is always good for the heart and the soul!”

Frances was diagnosed with dementia in 2015 at the age of 48. Since then, she and her husband John, the owners of Click! Design That Fits, have openly shared her diagnosis with the West Seattle community.

“It was important for me to share the news about my diagnosis,” says Frances, “because I knew I couldn’t hide from it, and I don’t think it does anyone any good to try to hide. Remaining engaged in the community is important to me personally, and it seems to be one of the best things for people dealing with memory loss.”

With over 100,000 Washingtonians, and over 5 million Americans, living with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias, Frances is certainly not alone. However, it can be easy for people with dementia to feel socially isolated. Although they remain vital members of the community, social stigma and other barriers can prevent them from staying involved and engaged.

In this context, a local movement called Momentia is empowering people with memory loss and their loved ones to stay connected and active in their communities. People and organizations are coming together to produce “dementia-friendly” opportunities in popular public spaces – like walking groups at Woodland Park Zoo, art gallery tours at the Frye Art Museum, and service projects at the Cherry Street Food Bank. (Learn more at momentiaseattle.org)

“For too long, a dementia diagnosis has meant fear, shame and isolation,” states Marigrace Becker, Program Manager for Community Education and Impact at the UW Medicine Memory & Brain Wellness Center. “People with memory loss and their loved ones deserve to stay engaged in their communities – and by working together, we can make that happen.”

Here in West Seattle, Momentia is taking off. In the fall, a group of organizations and neighbors involved in the Momentia movement hosted a community meeting for people with memory loss and their loved ones to develop their own dementia-friendly programs, making use of favorite West Seattle venues.

As a result, several new programs are in the works. In the new year, Providence Mount St. Vincent began opening up their drum circle to others living with dementia in the wider West Seattle community. Seattle Parks and Recreation, the Senior Center of West Seattle, and others are offering a 4-week creative arts and storytelling workshop for people with dementia and their loved ones.

And now, the Momentia group of West Seattle is proud to announce “Rock the House.” Whether you have dementia, love someone with dementia, or want to meet others who support a dementia-friendly community, you are invited to attend.

The event is offered in partnership by Shadowland, Click! Design That Fits, the Senior Center of West Seattle, Full Life Care, Seattle Parks and Recreation, and Providence Mount St. Vincent.

Remembering Mary Anderson, 107, who co-founded REI in West Seattle

Almost 80 years after Mary Anderson and her husband Lloyd Anderson co-founded what became outdoor giant REI in their Gatewood home, she has died at the age of 107. We obtained the photo above from REI, whose past presidents Dennis Madsen, Sally Jewell (also a West Seattleite), and Wally Smith are shown with Ms. Anderson at her centennial-birthday celebration. The company’s statement on her passing:

Mary’s legacy is deeply engrained in REI and her contributions to the outdoor community extend far beyond the co-op. REI and our employees are grateful to the Andersons for their dedication to REI and the incredible foundation they established. It is our honor to carry on their commitment more than 75 years later and beyond.

Mary Anderson and her husband also were Mountaineers; she was just 20 when they joined the club in 1929. The Mountaineers website tells her story, including how their quest to make it easier to get good-quality climbing gear led them to create the buyers’ cooperative that became REI, from which she retired in 1968. For years, their home in west Gatewood was headquarters to what is now a multibillion-dollar company. That house was renovated as part of site redevelopment at the turn of the millennium.

Anderson’s husband was the company’s president until 1971; he died in 2000 at age 98; the Seattle Times obituary for Ms. Anderson says she died March 27th and is survived by one of her two daughters and by two grandsons. No details on whether there will be a public memorial, REI told us.

CONGRATULATIONS! 2017 Westside Awards for Eldercare Consulting, Peel & Press, SW Youth & Family Services, Maria Groen

Just announced by the West Seattle Chamber of Commerce – the 2017 winners of the Westside Awards. Back in February, the Chamber invited you to nominate businesses and people for the four categories, and the awards go to:

Business of the Year:
Eldercare Consulting, LLC

Proprietor Patricia Throop helps families with their needs “to find competent, safe and appropriate solutions for their needs.” She also volunteers and sits on several boards.

Emerging Business of the Year:
Peel & Press

(At right, Peel & Press proprietor Dan Austin, whose restaurant is in its third year at 6503 California SW in Morgan Junction. He’s been a catalyst for a variety of community projects and is currently working on a project meant to result in the restoration of the historic mural on the west side of the building that is home to his business and four others.)

Not-for-Profit of the Year:
Southwest Youth & Family Services

SWYFS’s role in the community – and its geographic presence – has continued to grow, as we detailed in a conversation with its longtime executive director Steve Daschle last fall. The many services they provide include education and health care, and they are one of the largest local nonprofits working with vulnerable populations such as immigrants and refugees.

Westsider of the Year:
Maria Groen

Maria is a fixture in the West Seattle community, in no small part because of her roles with organizations including WestSide Baby and the West Seattle YMCA. Currently she works with Seattle University.

You can applaud them in person at the 2017 Annual Westside Awards Breakfast on May 4th at Salty’s. Get your tickets by going here.

COMMUNITY GIVING: West Seattle Girl Scout Troop 44398 donating craft kits to hospitalized kids

Girl Scout generosity and resourcefulness were on display at West Seattle (Admiral) Library Thursday afternoon. Troop 44398 members were putting together more than 200 craft kits to donate to kids who are getting care at Children’s Hospital, inspired by a desire to help after finding out that one troop member’s sister would be going there for brain-tumor treatment. Assembling the kits was an intense amount of work!

This was an all-West Seattle enterprise, as the kits to make polka-dot lanterns were from West Seattle-based Trendy Crafts, whose co-founder Julie Rasmussen says they “can be easily crafted from a hospital bed.”

CRIME WATCH: White Center shooting-suspect search extending into West Seattle

11:03 PM: On partner site White Center Now, we’re covering a shooting that happened in WC about half an hour ago. A man has serious but not life-threatening injuries. The shooter is said to have fled north toward Roxbury so Seattle Police are helping with a wide-ranging search in case he’s in West Seattle. Updates as we get them.

12:04 AM: No further information from KCSO, but we expect to get more details later this morning and will update here and on WCN.

VIDEO: West Seattle Eagle Scout Ben Beale presents firefighter memorial at Joint Training Facility


(WSB photos and video)

22 years after four Seattle firefighters died in the Mary Pang warehouse arson, the loss continues to loom large for SFD. The department’s Joint Training Facility in southeast West Seattle has a new memorial to the lost firefighters, thanks to a local Eagle Scout who officially presented it at a ceremony this afternoon.

Ben Beale is an 18-year-old O’Dea HS senior who is a member of West Seattle Troop 282. He and his troop were at the JTF this afternoon along with SFD Chief Harold Scoggins (with Ben in the photo above) and other SFD representatives, including firefighter Isaac Rivera, who introduced Ben and worked with him on the project, for which Seattle Fire Fighters Union IAFF Local 27 was also acknowledged:

Before the ceremony, we asked Ben how he first heard of the Pang arson tragedy, which happened years before he was born. He explained that his brother also had created a memorial which was on display at West Seattle’s Fire Station 32 (and will be returned when the new FS 32 is complete). He decided to make one for the JTF.

Along with a small-scale model of Hai Ying Wu‘s Occidental Square memorial sculpture, its materials include rock, rope, and rough-hewn wood, to show the challenging circumstances in which firefighters risk their lives. “Firefighters work hard, and find a way to get things done,” he noted.

Ben’s project will be permanently on display in the JTF administration building’s main hallway. While it’s not routinely open to the public, the building does host some public events (such as community meetings in the past year related to the nearby Myers Way Parcels), so look for it if you go to one.

VIDEO: West Seattle activist Aji Piper keynotes WAGIN conference @ Chief Sealth IHS

Toward the end of the first day of the Washington Global Issues Network conference at Chief Sealth International High School, West Seattle climate activist Aji Piper, 16, took the stage as a keynoter.

The question he started with was simple: “How did I get involved in the environmental movement and why?”

The answers, complex. We recorded his almost-hour-long speech on video:

Piper spoke about his work, from early participation in Plant for the Planet, to being one of what are now 21 young plaintiffs suing the federal government over its failure to protect their rights to clean air and water.

“Climate change means life as we know it will change,” he declared. And he recounted some life-changing climate events that have rocked the globe already, from 314+ square miles of wildfire damage last year – “more than 152,000 football fields” – to storms like Hurricane Sandy.

“I thought about my home. What did this all mean for the people and places I love? What do I do with this knowledge? … I’m one person in a world of 7 billion people. What am I going to do about this?”

What he has done in the past several years started with planting trees to writing and performing protest songs with a ukulele, as he learned about new issues including oil trains and Arctic drilling. To challenge the latter, he wrote and performed a protest song, with his ukulele, at a Seattle Port Commission meeting (his slide for this featured a framegrab of WSB video from that 2015 meeting). And he joined in the “kayaktivism” off West Seattle’s shore as the Polar Pioneer drilling rig floated in.

He got involved with Earth Guardians.

And then there was the lawsuit, which, he said, hasn’t gone to trial yet, but has had several hearings. (He and his co-plaintiffs have had international publicity because of it.) They’re representing everyone in the U.S., he asserted, saying we all have rights to clean water and air, and “a livable future.”

WAGIN continues Saturday at Sealth, with the ~100 student attendees from all over the state spending the day in workshops and hearing from three more keynote speakers, including Seattle activist and mayoral candidate Nikkita Oliver toward day’s end. This is the second time in three years that Sealth has hosted the conference.

GRATITUDE: Community thanked for donating to help refugee families

Two recent Saturdays, you were invited to donate items at Hope Lutheran Church to help refugee families. Tonight, we have a wrapup and thank-you message from organizers:

A tremendous thank you to both our community and our congregation for the response to our collection of items for the Refugee Kits. We are happy to send the following items to Lutheran Community Services to aid in helping incoming refugee families:

8 personal care kits, 25 kitchen kits, 16 bathroom kits, 3 teapots, 12 blankets, 5 throws, 7 sets of sheets, one pillow, two crock pots, large box of extra kitchen items, large box of feminine products, large box of personal care items.

What a beautiful example of loving others as ourselves! Thank you!

Leadership change at West Seattle/Fauntleroy YMCA, as Josh Sutton heads east and Shalimar Gonzales heads west


(WSB photo)

Above are the West Seattle/Fauntleroy YMCA‘s current and future leaders – Josh Sutton and Shalimar Gonzales, photographed at the Y’s Triangle headquarters this morning. This announcement from the Y (a longtime WSB sponsor) explains:

The West Seattle & Fauntleroy YMCA will be changing executive leadership this spring, with Shalimar Gonzales coming over from the Meredith Mathews East Madison YMCA and Josh Sutton headed to the Bellevue Family YMCA.

These moves are part of a larger Seattle YMCA reorganization to ensure continued strong programs and services locally and success for our 2020 Opportunities for All Campaign, including the completed new Sammamish Y and the West Seattle Y’s expansion and renovation. A new Kent Y that will break ground in 2018 and the University Y are major projects still in the works, and Josh will also manage the construction for the Kent YMCA.

“It’s been an amazing time here and I’m so happy with all we’ve gotten done,” says Josh, “I’m thankful for the educational & youth programs we have established in schools, the support of the community as we raised over $4 million locally for our expansion and renovation- just fantastic. I’m especially pleased to have Shalimar here next – she’s a great Y leader for our West Seattle community.”

Shalimar brings nearly 15 years of Y leadership to her new role, most recently as the executive of the Meredith Mathews East Madison YMCA in the Central area of Seattle. “I’m excited to hit the ground running in West Seattle as the board, staff, and community continue to develop what it means to be a YMCA in the 21st century.”

The two executives began planning the transition earlier this month, along with the West Seattle & Fauntleroy Y Board. Josh will wrap up his work at the end of March, with Shalimar coming over in the following weeks.

Gary Potter, current Board Chair, shares: “We thank Josh for his steadfast and positive leadership throughout his many years here. Our Y is in a great position to serve the growing and changing needs of West Seattle because of his work. We’re excited to partner with Shalimar as we look forward to what the community needs next from our YMCA.”

Sutton has been leading the West Seattle Y since 2001, and working with the regional organization since the mid-’80s, preceded by years of Y membership and volunteering while growing up in our area.

West Seattle Troop 282’s Saturday service

Thanks to Kevin McMahan for the photos and report:

Scouts from West Seattle’s Troop 282 were working in the rain for seven hours today on a conservation service project at the Van Asselt Community Center. Their efforts count toward the prestigious 50 Miler Award which they are working toward. Special thanks to the Seattle Parks Department and Mr. Paul Smith for his mentorship.


The troop is in its seventh decade, according to its online history.

LAST CALL: Nominate someplace/someone for this year’s Westside Awards by tomorrow

March 5, 2017 10:18 am
|    Comments Off on LAST CALL: Nominate someplace/someone for this year’s Westside Awards by tomorrow
 |   West Seattle news | West Seattle people

Got a little time to spare today for your community – something you can do right where you are right now? It’s the second-to-last day to nominate businesses/people for this year’s Westside Awards, presented by the West Seattle Chamber of Commerce, which sent this reminder:

West Seattle is home to many remarkable people and successful and innovative businesses with amazing stories. We need your input. Each year the West Seattle Chamber of Commerce looks to the West Seattle Community to nominate businesses and individuals for the annual Westside Awards. The recipients from past years listed below.

Westside Business of the Year

Westside Emerging Business of the Year

Westside Not-for-Profit of the Year

Westsider of the Year

Deadline for Nominations: March 6th

Your input is valuable because the number of votes is not the criteria for winning. Criteria includes how the candidate:

Demonstrates the highest standards
Promotes diversity, equality, and inclusiveness
Demonstrates a consistent commitment to environmental sustainability
Takes a leadership role in the community

There is always room for anything else you would like to share. On March 7th, your nominations and comments will be submitted to the selection committee and on May 4th the recipients will receive their award. Everyone is invited to attend!

Here’s the form you can use to nominate. Past year’s winners, dating back to 2010 (when WSB was honored to be chosen as Business of the Year), are listed on the Chamber’s home page.

VIDEO: West Seattle birthday flash mob outside OutWest

For a few festive moments tonight, a milestone birthday celebration at OutWest Bar went outdoors for a flash mob! Sindy Todo was celebrating the big 6-5 – that’s Sindy above in gold, and below (note the cap – and the matching dresses!) with Dolly Madison, who performs at OutWest on Saturday nights:

And of course there was dancing:

Thanks to Jill for the tip, and happy birthday, Sindy!

YOU CAN HELP: Tragedy strikes New Leaf Bistro ownership family


(Family photo, used with permission)

Every small, family-owned business has a story. Recently, the one behind New Leaf Bistro in The Admiral District turned tragic. Less than a year and a half after opening the restaurant in the former Royal India Grill space, co-proprietors Geoffrey Ly and Shi Qiu Chen found out in December that Geoffrey had “a very aggressive cancer,” customer and friend Suzanne Krom writes. “His doctors started treatment but it quickly overwhelmed his system, and on January 29th, he died. He was only 55 years old.”

The couple has two young children, 10-year-old Angelina and 8-year-old Kelvin. Chen is now raising them alone and running the restaurant, a 17-hour-a-day job.

When Suzanne found out about Geoffrey’s death, she wanted to do something to help, something with which the community could help too. So today she launched a GoFundMe page. She writes that “the business and family are in jeopardy. Friends have rallied around her and customers who know about the loss of Geoffrey have been supportive too. But it’s not enough, which is why we have set up this GoFundMe page. Any donations of any size are welcome. We have a goal of $30,000 to help Shi Qiu pay for Geoffrey’s funeral costs. … Shi Qiu and her children will be eternally grateful for any help they receive. It will help make this tragedy something they can recover from. And it will feel like Geoffrey is indeed watching over them, making sure they are going to be okay.”

Mr. Ly’s West Seattle ties, by the way, went beyond New Leaf Bistro; as we reported when it opened, he also operated Hunan Express in Morgan Junction at the turn of the millennium. Again, if you’d like to help, the GoFundMe page is here.

‘Bias Hurts’: City sets up hotline for reporting discriminatory harassment

In case you missed the announcement this week – the city has a new hotline you can use to report harassment, 206-233-7100. From the Seattle Office for Civil Rights (SOCR) news release:

The Hotline is part of the City of Seattle’s Bias Hurts Campaign for Seattle residents and business owners who are the targets of discriminatory harassment, including threats, slurs, intimidation and cyberbullying.

“We’ve set up the hotline so people in Seattle can contact the Office for Civil Rights immediately if they are harassed or discriminated against,” said SOCR Director Patricia Lally. “But more important, we want to join with the community to develop actions that we can take to protect and support people over the long term. As a community, we need to take care of one another as much as we can.”

The campaign includes three key components: a hotline (206-233-7100) to report harassment, meetings with community groups from across the city to learn what people are experiencing and how the City can proactively address them, and a media campaign to publicize the City’s efforts. The media campaign will include print ads, social media, ads on buses and trains, radio and direct outreach to community groups.

SOCR is coordinating its actions with the Seattle Police Department, which enforces criminal laws against hate crimes, also known as malicious harassment. Anyone who experiences physical violence, property damage or threats should call 911 to report directly to the police. People should call SOCR’s hotline if they experience discriminatory harassment in housing, employment, or public places that does not rise to the level of a crime.

It is illegal in Seattle to harass someone based on race, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity and other protected groups. SOCR can investigate allegations of discriminatory harassment, issue findings and mandate remedies.

“I urge anyone who feels they’ve been harassed to call the Anti-Bias Hotline at 206-233-7100,” said Lally. “By supporting one another we can send a clear message: all of us are welcome in Seattle. That’s what the City of Seattle’s Anti-Bias Campaign is all about.”

Report discriminatory harassment to SOCR by calling 206-233-7100.

Report bias-related crime to Seattle Police by calling 911.

Visit the Seattle Police Department’s Bias/Hate Crime Data Dashboard.

According to the dashboard, the Southwest Precinct – West Seattle and South Park – has the lowest reported amount of such incidents so far this year: 1.

P.S. You can also file a complaint online by going here.

CONGRATULATIONS! Chief Sealth IHS student Katherine Fry receives award, scholarship


(Photo by Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren/Woodland Park Zoo: Katherine Fry with zoo president/CEO Alejandro Grajal)

Chief Sealth International High School student Katherine Fry was honored at the Woodland Park Zoo‘s first-ever Thrive Leadership Awards dinner on Tuesday night. Not only did she receive the Youth Conservation Award, she also received a $5,000 scholarship. Fry was honored, the zoo says, “for contributing nearly 800 hours of volunteer service and providing leadership in the zoo’s youth programs including ZooCorps, Seattle Youth Climate Action Network, and Citizen Science Amphibian Monitoring.” She’s going to Western Washington University this fall, planning to study biology and environmental science.

WEDNESDAY: 1 soccer match with 2 West Seattleite-linked goals

“Awesome Avery” Berg, the West Seattle 11-year-old fighting a rare type of brain tumor, is now six months post-diagnosis and one month post-surgery. Her mom Kristie Berg is continuing to publish updates online. And she e-mailed us the other day with not only an update on Avery, but also because she wants to make sure you know about an upcoming soccer match with part of the proceeds going to pediatric brain-tumor research in Avery’s honor: It’s on Wednesday at Memorial Stadium downtown, a “testimonial match” honoring newly retired Seattle Sounders FC veteran Zach Scott, who lives in West Seattle.


(Zach Scott @ his final regular-season game last October – Sounders FC photo by Jane Gershovich)

If you’re not familiar with the “testimonial match” concept, the original announcement from Sounders FC – co-hosting the match with Emerald City Supporters – includes this:

… Testimonials are a long-standing tradition in soccer culture, particularly in the United Kingdom and South America. These special matches are held to honor a particular player for his or her service to the club.

The Zach Scott Testimonial Match is taking place at Memorial Stadium (401 5th Avenue N.), the home of the Seattle Sounders in 1974-1975 and 1997-2002. With teams coached by fellow Sounders FC originals Osvaldo Alonso and Brad Evans, the match is set to feature teammates and friends across all 15 years of Scott’s career in Seattle, including Kasey Keller, Roger Levesque and Jhon Kennedy Hurtado, among others. …

(Here’s who else is set to play.) Scott was known during his career for giving tirelessly to local causes, as noted in our September story about his retirement announcement. Proceeds from tickets to the 7 pm match will benefit the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation, the RAVE Foundation, and a college fund for Scott’s three children. Scott published a post online this week about why he chose the PBTF, explaining that he and his family are longtime friends of the Berg family:

… The Berg family, ever faithful, decided to pour all their time and resources into not only the care of their daughter, but in bringing awareness to the incredible lack of funding and resources given to pediatric brain tumor research. The community rallied around the Berg family and with the help of The Run of Hope, raised over $150,000 in a few short weeks in an attempt to do so. All of that money was given directly to Seattle Children’s Hospital for research and clinical trials for pediatric brain tumors.

However, that is not enough. Pediatric Cancer currently receives only 4% of the national budget spent on cancer research and development. On March 1, I will lace up my boots one last time with several of my friends in an attempt to further these efforts. Seattle has always shown me and my family such love. I urge you to do something amazing and continue to support families that face these devastating realities. It could be any of us. As Avery would say, “You are the difference makers.” A portion of proceeds from ticket sales as well as all the in-match auction proceeds will go to the Pediatric Brain Tumor Research Fund run by Seattle Children’s Hospital.

You can get your tickets to the match by going here. Meantime, in addition to her ongoing online updates (the most recent one is here), Avery’s mom tells WSB, “Avery is still fighting and has three more months of awful chemo, but she is doing very well considering. She had a downright miraculous surgery in January where they were able to remove 100% of her tumor. It’s a long, awful road, but we are doing our best and will continue to fight to support pediatric cancer research and advancement.”

GRATITUDE: West Seattle Girl Scout’s library project draws big donation

We’ve shared updates before from local Girl Scout Alina Guyon, who is working on a Gold Award project to build a library for refugees in Uganda. West Seattleites have donated more than 1,000 books, and now she’s sharing words of gratitude for another big donation:

Thank you Alki Lumber!

When you heard that I was building a library for refugees in Uganda, you generously offered to help. The library project not only involves sending books by container, but I’m also building an actual library. Alki Lumber donated all kinds of paint and materials to help complete the structure. Thank you for being such a generous business and key part of our West Seattle Community.

There are currently more refugees in the world than any time since World War II. While we can’t easily affect our nation’s immigration policies, this is a small way our community can make a difference to people forcibly displaced from their homes. I am so amazed by the outpouring of support from West Seattle.

DAY WITHOUT IMMIGRANTS: White Center, South Delridge closures

Thanks to Jen Calleja for the tip – multiple White Center businesses are closed today for the Day Without Immigrants protest against the federal crackdown on immigrants. We stopped by some of the businesses she mentioned – above, the sign at Greenbridge Café; below, the signs at Salvadorean Bakery and Best Roasted Corn:

And Jen sent this collage of other businesses she found closed, including Deli Garcia in South Delridge:

We haven’t seen/heard of any other West Seattle closures – if you have, please let us know – editor@westseattleblog.com or 206-293-6302.

Meantime, there’s news about the court fight over the presidential order on immigration – according to a news release from state Attorney General Bob Ferguson, saying a federal appeals court was notified that “the President intends in the near future to rescind the Order and replace it with a new, substantially revised Executive Order” to eliminate constitutional concerns. Ferguson’s reaction: “Let’s be clear: Today’s court filing by the federal government recognizes the obvious — the President’s current Executive Order violates the Constitution.”

2017 WESTSIDE AWARDS: Nominate somebody right now!

February 15, 2017 10:25 pm
|    Comments Off on 2017 WESTSIDE AWARDS: Nominate somebody right now!
 |   West Seattle businesses | West Seattle news | West Seattle people

You’re invited to nominate somebody – and/or someplace – for this year’s Westside Awards, to be presented by the West Seattle Chamber of Commerce on May 4th.

The categories again this year are:

Westside Business of the Year
Westside Emerging Business of the Year
Westside Not-for-Profit of the Year
Westsider of the Year

The nomination form is online, here. It includes more information on the criteria for each category. Nominees do NOT have to be WS Chamber members, nor do those sending in nomination(s). You can see who’s won in recent years by going here. Nominate someone/someplace (yes, you can send in multiple nominations) by March 6th!

NEIGHBOR DAY: High Point event brings together neighbors from near and far

By Cliff Cawthon
Reporting for West Seattle Blog

Neighborhood House’s High Point Center is a place where neighbors gather almost every day of the year.

But Saturday afternoon had something extra – a Neighbor Day gathering with an emphasis on welcoming and celebrating the neighborhood’s immigrant communities amid the Trump Administration’s attempts at what’s being called the “Muslim Ban.”

“A lot of people who we work with could be affected by the immigrant ban,” explained Megan Demeroutis, Neighborhood House’s Family Resource Center supervisor. Demeroutis said that the potluck’s international flavor and the activities were meant to bring people together in the mixed-income Seattle Housing Authority– managed community. Read More

NEIGHBOR DAY: Connect with your neighbors @ West Seattle Office Junction

February 11, 2017 12:38 pm
|    Comments Off on NEIGHBOR DAY: Connect with your neighbors @ West Seattle Office Junction
 |   Neighborhoods | West Seattle news | West Seattle people


(WSB photos)

Not only is West Seattle Office Junction (WSB sponsor) a place to cowork – it’s also a place to connect with your neighbors, especially today! Until 2 pm, in honor of Neighbor Day, several local groups/organizations have reps there to answer your questions – including West Seattle Time Bank, Plant for the Planet – Washington State, Urban Homestead Foundation, Terraganics Living, Seattle Farm School, West Seattle Bee Garden, West Seattle Food Bank, The Community General Store, and Backyard Barter.


(Office Junction co-proprietors Stefan and Christine)


(Kids’ activity table)

Stop in (6040 California SW), have a cup of coffee, and find out how to get more connected within the West Seattle community.

WP-Backgrounds by InoPlugs Web Design and Juwelier Schönmann