Followup: Surveillance video from South Delridge shooting/robbery

Seattle Police have just gone public with that video from this morning’s shooting/robbery outside the South Delridge 7-11 (WSB early-morning coverage here). And they have new information. From the accompanying SPD Blotter post:

SPD Robbery detectives collected video surveillance from the scene of this morning’s shooting and are now working to identify a group of suspects.

In the video, the group of suspects can be seen circling through the parking lot of a West Seattle 7-11 in a gray or silver Buick early this morning, before they climb out of their car and confront several men and women standing outside the store.

During the confrontation, one of the suspects grabbed a man’s phone and demanded his watch before the suspects returned to their Buick.

As the group of suspects began to drive away, one of the victims lobbed something at the suspects’ car. The driver of the Buick then fired several shots out a car window — striking one man in the buttocks and a woman in both her legs — and sped away from the scene.

Witnesses described the gunman as a white male in his mid 20s, possibly with blonde hair, and said he was accompanied by three black males in their 20s and 30s.

If you recognize the suspects in the video or know anything about this case, please call the SPD Robbery Unit at (206) 684-5535.

11 Replies to "Followup: Surveillance video from South Delridge shooting/robbery"

  • ennui29 September 5, 2014 (4:21 pm)

    I hope they catch these guys. First degree assault with a deadly weapon will most likely land the gunmen 7-10 years. RCW 9A.36.011.
    This offense is a class A felony seriousness level XII. This means for a first time offender with no criminal record, the potential sentence is 93-123 months in prison and fines of up to $50,000
    Say goodbye to your 20’s a-hole.

  • Foucault September 5, 2014 (4:41 pm)

    I hope they catch these guys. First degree assault with a deadly weapon will most likely land the gunmen 7-10 years. RCW 9A.36.011.
    This offense is a class A felony seriousness level XII. This means for a first time offender with no criminal record, the potential sentence is 93-123 months in prison and fines of up to $50,000
    Say goodbye to your 20′s scumbag.

  • wscommuter September 5, 2014 (5:22 pm)

    It’s more than that … add 5 years firearm enhancement which runs consecutive to the standard range, and for Assault 1, they can charge two counts (each victim), and because it is a “serious violent” offense, the standard ranges run consecutively as well. These idiots can do 20 years easily.

  • unknown September 5, 2014 (5:47 pm)

    WOW what is wrong with people now a days? Really how much can a phone and watch be worth and what kind of status does this give these punks anyways???
    It just makes me sick that they have no feelings of respect for others and let alone themselves.

  • Eric September 5, 2014 (6:23 pm)

    If the video can be enhanced, then they could get the license plate number

  • Timmy Tucker September 5, 2014 (8:30 pm)

    So what you’re saying is that these guys will be back on the street in a few weeks. : /

  • chris w September 5, 2014 (10:16 pm)

    My sister was going to work while this happened and heard people yelling in the alley behind 7-11 right after the shooting. Not sure if they were some of the people with the victims. They were yelling “shut up, just stay there”.

  • M September 6, 2014 (2:53 pm)

    In a previous thread there was talk about the lack of marksmanship skills the shooter demonstrated. He was certainly outrageously reckless, but I’m not so sure that he wasn’t a good shot, like most school shooters seemed to have been. In my teens, I was the junior state champion trap shooter in Montana, and it took years to get that good. How did these guys do it? Are guns really that easy to use? Where did they practice?
    .
    The practiced on the teenage boys’ version of a Boeing flight simulator – the first person shooter video game. Pilots spend hundreds of hours on very realistic simulators before they ever set foot in a cockpit. They work, and Boeing wouldn’t be using them if they didn’t. Young boys spend thousands of hours on incredibly detailed and realistic video games, improving their skills as they move from each progressively harder level to the next. And by the time you get to the final level of Microsoft’s final Halo series, for example, you know how to aim and shoot a gun. And if you get through Grand Theft Auto, for example, you’ll know how to shoot just about every handgun on the market, and will have practiced with it a thousand times. One of the strange unintended consequences of this phenomenon for gun manufacturers is that having your gun featured in a video game like Grand Theft Auto would be like free advertising on the Super Bowl for anyone else. Ask the Glock handgun company. The shareholders must be thrilled.
    .
    An even odder consequence of this deadly new development, a development very few people saw coming, including myself, is that most of the sketchy guys with the guns over in the bad parts of town really don’t want to kill anybody because they don’t want to go to prison for a long time. Shooting someone in the butt, leg or arm is ok, even has some prestige, like may have happened here. And it’s only possible because these guys are really really good marksmen. And I prefer to admire and focus on the huge effort these guys put into becoming great shots, rather than the other stuff, mostly because there are no easy solutions to the other stuff. It’s too late to ban first person shooter games.

  • jblues September 6, 2014 (11:08 pm)

    M, you don’t learn to shoot a real gun from video games anymore than you do from using a spray bottle to clean your bathtub. Pressing a button a controller in a video game is not the same as loading, aiming, and firing a real weapon. Give me a break.
    .
    You are obviously either seriously misinformed about video games, have never played them, really dislike them for whatever reason, or you are just repeating things you have read on the internet from other people who don’t know what they are talking about.
    .
    “And if you get through Grand Theft Auto, for example, you’ll know how to shoot just about every handgun on the market, and will have practiced with it a thousand times.”
    .
    The gameplay mechanic for a weapon in this game all functions the same. There isn’t any trick to learn for each one. It’s the same simple button press for them all. It’s like pressing the “jump” button in a Super Mario game.
    .
    Why not argue that somebody who just watched a John Wayne movie from the 50’s, then gos outside to play cowboys using a broom stick as their rifle and pretending to aim and shoot is just as effective?
    .
    I seriously doubt that any of these guys are as you put it “really really good marksmen” and thats why they are shooting people in the butt, leg or arms. Instead, it’s probably because they don’t know what the hell they are doing. It’s a safe bet, they have never had real firearms instruction, are panicked and not thinking, and blindly shooting at whatever is in the general direction the gun is aimed.

  • Eric September 7, 2014 (7:04 am)

    I agree with jblues. “Shooting” a gun in a video game is not even in the same ball park as shooting a real gun.

    Anyone that knows about guns knows that a hand gun’s accuracy range is not all that great (something that video games seem to overlook in realism). Couple that with the fact that a hand gun (depending on the size) has a certain amount of kickback to it (something that a video game doesn’t have) and the fact that unless the gun is equipped with a laser (which is highly unlikely) that unlike a video game that has a target marker on the screen, the person was shooting at night only using the regular sights of the gun at best. Since many guns need to be sighted to some degree, I doubt that this person’s was accurately sighted to make him the “marksman” you may think he is. It was most likely either at very close range or he got lucky,

  • Hilms September 12, 2014 (12:59 am)

    @M – “Ask the Glock handgun company. The shareholders must be thrilled.”

    Glock is a privately held company.

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