VIDEO: Orcas in the area again, caught on video by Vashon Island

April 18, 2015 at 4:30 pm | In Seen at sea, West Seattle news, Wildlife | No Comments

Thanks to Lindsay for sharing the video – without much notice, two killer whales headed south along Vashon Island shores earlier today, around 1 pm. She says the sighting was a surprise, while she was giving a tour of the area to two friends visiting from Colorado. Also, a texter told us of a sighting near Brown’s Point in Tacoma, so if you’re by the water, keep watch – they’ll have to come back this way sooner or later.

West Seattle wildlife: It’s ‘watch out for goslings’ season

April 18, 2015 at 11:42 am | In West Seattle news, Wildlife | No Comments

Headed for the water? The baby Canada Goose photo and reminder are from David Hutchinson:

Three goslings were hatched recently on the pilings north of Salty’s. A couple years ago, their father was taken to PAWS by Seal Sitters. He had been attacked by a dog and suffered a severe bite while trying to protect his goslings near the Don Armeni boat ramp.

It would be thoughtful if you come across them while walking your dog (which is hopefully on a leash) to keep at a distance. If approached, they will panic and try to scramble over the rocks to escape to the water. Often, the small goslings will fall into the crevices and become trapped. People have been pretty considerate in the past while driving on Harbor Ave by stopping and allowing them to cross the road – the grass is always greener on the other side.

This is the eighth year David has shared at least one gosling photo via WSB. From the archives:

*2014
*First 2013 photo
*First 2012 photo
*First 2011 photo
*First 2010 photo
*First 2009 photo
*2008

West Seattle Whale Watch: Return of the orcas!

April 15, 2015 at 10:46 am | In Seen at sea, West Seattle news, Wildlife | 7 Comments

10:46 AM: According to a text tipster and the Orca Network Facebook page, you just might see orcas between Fauntleroy and Vashon right now – heading slowly southbound, according to observers, but at some point they might turn around, so this is your official heads-up that they’re in the area. Please comment if you see them! (And we ALWAYS appreciate texted tips about so many things – 206-293-6302, any time of the day/night.)

12:24 PM: We didn’t have any luck right around 11 from the Brace Point area – but two commenters have been watching more recently – thanks for the updates!

ADDED 7:44 AM: Some video from Wednesday, posted to YouTube and credited to Alisa Lemire Brooks/Orca Network, identifying these orcas as transients, not residents.

West Seattle coyotes: Gatewood, Puget Ridge sightings

April 14, 2015 at 3:56 pm | In Coyotes, West Seattle news, Wildlife | 15 Comments

GATEWOOD REPORT #1: Mickey shared photos of coyote sightings this week in the Orchard Street Ravine (map) area, including the one above.

GATEWOOD REPORT #2: Not far from there, at 36th/Myrtle (map), Eugene reports: “3 pm today. Walking up Myrtle street in broad daylight. Maybe it’s not news anymore. But it looked like a chupacabra with fur so I thought I’d mention it.”

PUGET RIDGE: Forwarded from a neighborhood list, a sighting at midmorning today near 21st/Dawson (map).

REMINDER: The best thing you can do if/when you see a coyote is, scare it away – “hazing,” as wildlife advocates put it, explained here. (WSB coyote coverage is archived here.)

Congratulations! Emmy nominations for sea-star photography by ‘Diver Laura’ James

April 13, 2015 at 9:57 pm | In Seen at sea, West Seattle news, Wildlife | 7 Comments

Congratulations to frequent WSB contributor “Diver Laura” James and her colleagues on that 2014 KCTS report about the sea-star die-off – they’ve been nominated for the Pacific Northwest Emmy Awards. That’s one of two nominations for Laura – her underwater photography of the sea-star situation also is part of another Emmy-nominated KCTS report, “Is Alaska Safe for Starfish?” Last year, she won one for another public-TV project, about sea otters and climate change. The full list of this year’s regional Emmy Award nominations is here; the winners will be announced in June.

West Seattle wildlife: Bobcat sighting reported

April 1, 2015 at 5:47 pm | In West Seattle news, Wildlife | 11 Comments

Just received this from Tarah. It’s the second time in the past month or so we’ve heard about a possible bobcat – anyone else?

Hey, just wanted people to have a heads-up…I saw a bobcat in the parking lot of
Youngstown (Cultural Arts) center on Delridge. It ran off into the woods neighboring the lot. Just want people in that area to be forewarned so they can keep their animals safe.

The other possible sighting mentioned to us was three weeks ago, early morning, 59th/Alki. Here’s what the state Fish and Wildlife Department says about bobcats.

West Seattle wildlife: Sisters rescue injured owl

March 31, 2015 at 2:32 pm | In West Seattle news, Wildlife | 26 Comments

2:32 PM: The photo and story are from Pete:

My daughters, Sadie and Madeline, found an injured owl under a bush. (They thought it was fake because it didn’t move.) We called animal control and they sent an officer to pick it up and take it to the hospital.

You can see from the picture that it is very small – about the size of a hand. But the agent told us the owl is a full-grown adult “Burrow Owl.”

The owl went to PAWS wildlife rehabilitation in Lynnwood, and the agent stated it looked like it will fully recover.

We don’t know exactly where in West Seattle the owl was found, and Pete hasn’t replied to our followup yet, but we did look up some information you might find useful – the PAWS infosheet on what to do if you find an injured bird – see it here. We’re also checking on the type of owl, as online info says “burrowing owls” are only found east of the mountains in our state.

6:43 PM: Pete has replied and tells us his daughters found the owl near College Street Ravine (in Admiral). Meantime, commenters have identified it as a northern saw-whet owl.

Puget Sound’s orcas welcome fourth calf in three months

March 31, 2015 at 11:39 am | In Seen at sea, West Seattle news, Wildlife | 7 Comments

(Photo by naturalist/researcher Jeanne Hyde, Maya’s Legacy Whale Watching)
Word started getting around last night that Puget Sound’s orcas, the Southern Resident Killer Whales, have another new baby – and researchers have confirmed that this is the fourth calf spotted in three months. Three of them, including this one, were born to J Pod. The first report came from the Pacific Whale Watch Association; one of its members, Maya’s Legacy Whale Watching, spotted the baby off Galiano Island, British Columbia, on Monday. This means the SRKWs – J Pod, K Pod, L Pod – are up to 81 orcas in the wild (and the 82nd, Tokitae/Lolita, in captivity in Florida). The newest baby is J52; it’s been exactly three months since J50 was spotted, followed by J51 in mid-February, and then the L Pod baby two weeks later.

VIDEO: The Whale Trail’s first Orca Talk of 2015, with researcher Brad Hanson

March 28, 2015 at 11:34 am | In West Seattle news, Wildlife | 2 Comments

The Whale Trail‘s first Orca Talk of 2015 drew a good-sized crowd to C & P Coffee Company (WSB sponsor) on Thursday night – but in case you couldn’t be there to hear Brad Hanson from the NOAA Fisheries Science Center talk about the Southern Resident Killer Whales and his recent research trip – which included the discovery of the newest SRKW orca calf – we recorded it on video. Two parts – above (with TWT’s Donna Sandstrom introducing Hanson) and below.

Watch TWT’s website for word of the next event!

West Seattle whale-watching: Orcas in the area

March 25, 2015 at 10:13 am | In Seen at sea, West Seattle news, Wildlife | 1 Comment

Thanks to Norman for the tip via Twitter, and we see the Orca Network Facebook commenters are discussing it too: Orcas turned up along the Bainbridge ferry route earlier this morning and have now been seen heading south along West Seattle (Me-Kwa-Mooks, says Norman) – let us know if you see them!

Excited to hear about newest orca baby? The Whale Trail presents researcher who ‘found’ it, with tales from recent trip

March 12, 2015 at 1:12 pm | In West Seattle news, Wildlife | 1 Comment

(Photo by Candice Emmons, NWFSC, NOAA Research Permit #16163)
That’s the newest calf found (as reported here two weeks ago) with Puget Sound’s Southern Resident Killer Whales – L121 and mother L94, with NOAA research ship Bell M. Shimada in the background. The researcher who leads the NOAA program, Brad Hanson of the Northwest Fisheries Science Center, is coming to West Seattle later this month to talk about what they saw while observing the whales and what it means for their recovery. It’s the first Orca Talk of 2015, presented by The Whale Trail at 7 pm March 26th at C & P Coffee Company (WSB sponsor). Here’s the official announcement, just received:

Researchers recently spent 21 days aboard the NOAA ship Bell M. Shimada, tracking endangered Southern Resident killer whales (SRKWs) off the coasts of Washington and Oregon. Good weather and ocean conditions allowed researchers exceptional access to the whales, including the first sighting of new calf L121, during their winter foraging period.

The winter survey addressed a high research priority to fill a major gap in our understanding of SRKWs life history—where these whales go during the winter, what they do, and what they eat.

Join us for this special presentation by Dr. Brad Hanson, NWFSC lead killer whale researcher. Be the first to hear what researchers observed, and how data collected on this cruise will help recover J, K and L pods.

This is the first in the 2015 series Orca Talks hosted by The Whale Trail in West Seattle. The event also features updates from Robin Lindsay (Seal Sitters), and “Diver Laura” James (tox-ick.org).

Buy tickets early to reserve your seat. And hurry! This will likely sell out.

More about the speaker and TWT ahead:

Click to read the rest of Excited to hear about newest orca baby? The Whale Trail presents researcher who ‘found’ it, with tales from recent trip…

Followup: One fewer Alki otter – but ‘Otto’ is doing okay

February 27, 2015 at 12:01 pm | In West Seattle news, Wildlife | 10 Comments

Last weekend, we featured David Hutchinson‘s video of a river otter, now nicknamed “Otto,” who’s been in view lately on the Duwamish Head beaches. David – who is a Seal Sitters volunteer as well as an awesome photographer – says, “Quite a few passersby have stopped by for a look, and Otto is probably the most photographed wild river otter in Seattle.”

But there’s some sad news from the otter world, too. David and wife Eilene Hutchinson learned from a neighbor that an otter was “in the street near Salty’s. Eilene & I went down to take a look and found an otter dead in the southbound lane. On examination, this proved not to be Otto, who has a small growth on his left rear foot. We moved the otter off the roadway and contacted the city for removal.” He says it’s the second one they’ve seen in about two months, and so we’re reminding you again to watch for wildlife crossing along Harbor/Alki Avenues – river otters, for example, have inland dens, but go out into the bay to look for food, so they cross the road more often than you’d think. P.S. Thanks to David for also reminding us that you can learn more about river otters on the state Fish and Wildlife Department website.

Another baby born to Puget Sound orcas: New L Pod arrival!

February 26, 2015 at 12:00 pm | In Seen at sea, West Seattle news, Wildlife | 8 Comments


Announced this morning – the third calf born to Puget Sound’s resident orcas in the past two months! First came the two babies born to J Pod – we learned about J50 in late December, and then two weeks ago J51 was spotted; and today, NOAA Fisheries announces a baby seen with L Pod as its scientists tracked the whales off the seacoast. “The calf looked very energetic,” NOAA’s Brad Hanson reported.

While whale experts warn that mortality rates are high even in the best of times, this is nonetheless yet another sign of hope for the endangered Southern Resident Killer Whales. As noted when we covered one of The Whale Trail‘s orca talks here in West Seattle last fall, the resident pods previously hadn’t seen a birth in two years, and that calf did not survive.

VIDEO: Why Seal Sitters filled in as Otter Sitters for a while

February 21, 2015 at 5:58 pm | In West Seattle beaches, West Seattle news, Wildlife | 5 Comments

Thanks to David Hutchinson for sharing the video of a river otter (yes, the otters you see here are RIVER otters, not sea otters, which stick to the open ocean). He explains:

The otter was responded to by Seal Sitters earlier this month at Duwamish Head. While not classified as a marine mammal, our theme is “Share the Shore,” so volunteers kept an eye on him while he was using the beach. Thought you might also want to take a look at him going through his normal grooming routine.

Drive carefully on Harbor and Alki Avenues, because river otters do cross the road, as we’ve noted here before – their “dens” are generally inland, but they go out into Puget Sound looking for food.

P.S. Speaking of Seal Sitters, if you’d like to volunteer with the group, sign up ASAP for the next training session – four weeks from tomorrow, March 22nd, but spots are limited and usually fill up in advance. All the info you need is here.

VIDEO: West Seattle’s Cormorant Cove Park, the undersea view

February 16, 2015 at 11:30 pm | In Seen at sea, West Seattle news, Wildlife | 2 Comments

Late-night extra – another peek beneath the surface, courtesy of “Diver Laura” James. This is likely the first in a series of glimpses into the undersea world beyond the most-popular dive spots near Seacrest; in this short video, she shows you around at Cormorant Cove, the city park off Beach Drive by the Harbor West condos-on-pilings.

P.S. While you won’t see them because they were tucked away in crevices, Laura says “some surviving Ochre Sea Stars (the purple ones) and some young Mottled Stars (the orange ones)” were in view. She also calls our attention to South Sound U.S. Rep. Denny Heck‘s reintroduction of a bill to provide federal help to try to solve marine-disease emergencies like sea-star wasting syndrome – read about it here.

West Seattle coyotes: They’re out in the spring-like sunshine, too

February 16, 2015 at 8:32 pm | In Coyotes, West Seattle news, Wildlife | 5 Comments

Three daytime coyote sightings have been reported in the past day and a half, starting with the one texted with that photo along SW Rose in Gatewood. Then this afternoon, in the span of half an hour, Vanessa e-mailed word of one in an alley between 36th and 37th and Findlay – “thin, scared-looking,” she said – followed by Christine‘s note, saying, “Just wanted to let you know that there have been two coyote sightings in our neighborhood (38th and Morgan) on Saturday, Feb. 14th and today, Monday, Feb. 16th. Both sightings occurred around 1:30 pm.” It’s mating season for coyotes, and experts say that tends to increase their daytime activity. Find out more about coyote behavior – and how to help ensure they and we keep our distance from each other – via this state Department of Fish and Wildlife webpage; if you don’t have time to read through it, short version – if one gets too close, scare it away. And don’t leave food out.

Another new baby for Puget Sound’s endangered orcas: Welcome, J51!

February 12, 2015 at 7:35 pm | In Seen at sea, West Seattle news, Wildlife | 12 Comments

Another birth announcement for Puget Sound’s endangered Southern Resident Killer Whales – and, like the last one, this new baby has been spotted in J-Pod. Orca Network sent the news release and photo on behalf of the Center for Whale Research:

After spending the past two weeks near the west entrance of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, J pod finally came back into the interior Salish Sea waters and showed off another brand new baby whale to the few observers that braved the mist and light rain and watched the whales swim by from land and from vessels at respectful distance.

Dave Ellifrit from the Center for Whale Research, and Jeanne Hyde who first heard the whales on Lime Kiln hydrophone this morning, embarked on the Center ‘s research vessel “Chimo” to Haro Strait while CWR Senior Scientist, Ken Balcomb, watched from shore and managed communications.

The late December calf, J50, with its J16 family were seen today as well; but, the big news is that J19 and J41 were swimming protectively on either side on another new baby that we estimate is about one week old. This newest addition to J pod is designated J51, and the presumed mother is thirty-six year old J19. Her ten-year old daughter, J41, was also in attendance. The newest baby appears healthy.

This brings us to twenty-six whales in J pod, the most viable pod in the Endangered Southern Resident Killer Whale population of the US and Canada Pacific Northwest. K pod has 19 individuals, and L pod has 34 individuals for a total population of 79 SRKW’s as of today. That number can change anytime with the birth or death of one of these charismatic whales.

West Seattle whale watching: Orcas back in the area

February 8, 2015 at 12:55 pm | In Seen at sea, West Seattle news, Wildlife | Comments Off

12:55 PM: Orcas were spotted off Bainbridge Island within the past hour or so, headed toward Alki (thanks to Jeff Hogan of Killer Whale Tales for the alert, which is also on Orca Network‘s Facebook page). Let us know if you spot them!

2:06 PM: No reports yet from local waters but some have been spotted southbound off the east side of Vashon Island – you’d need really good binoculars to see from here.

NOAA decision is in: ‘Lolita,’ last surviving captive Puget Sound orca, to be included in endangered-species listing

February 4, 2015 at 11:42 am | In West Seattle news, Wildlife | 3 Comments

(January 17th WSB photo by Patrick Sand)
Two and a half weeks ago, hundreds rallied at Alki Beach to support freedom for the last surviving captive Puget Sound orca, best known as “Lolita.” The rally was partly in anticipation of a federal decision on whether to include Lolita in the endangered-species listing that already covers her wild family members. Today, this federal news release announces, the decision is in:

NOAA Fisheries will issue a final rule to include Lolita, a captive killer whale at the Miami Seaquarium, in the endangered species listing for Southern Resident Killer Whales that spend much of the year in the inland waters of Washington and British Columbia.

While Lolita will now share the endangered listing status of the population she came from, the decision does not impact her residence at the Miami Seaquarium.

Click to read the rest of NOAA decision is in: ‘Lolita,’ last surviving captive Puget Sound orca, to be included in endangered-species listing…

West Seattle whale-watching: Orcas headed this way

January 30, 2015 at 11:07 am | In Seen at sea, West Seattle news, Wildlife | 4 Comments

11:07 AM: Thanks to Trileigh for sounding the alert that Orca Network tipsters are reporting orcas headed north in Colvos Passage on the west side of Vashon – which means they might be visible from here at some point soon. The fog is of course complicating things, and even without fog, the whales might stay along the western shore of the sound, but we wanted to make sure you knew.

2:11 PM: The whales have gone into Rich Passage, which leads to Bremerton, as of the newest comments on the same Orca Network post we’ve linked above.

West Seattle coyotes: 2 more Upper Morgan/Gatewood sightings

January 29, 2015 at 8:20 pm | In Coyotes, West Seattle news, Wildlife | 1 Comment

Don’t know if it’s the same coyote, but two people reported sightings in the same general area of Gatewood/Upper Morgan (map) this afternoon. The photo is from John, who e-mailed to say: “Just took this pic this afternoon on Willow, between 39th and 38th. I was walking my dog and this coyote ran out in front of us, crossing the street into the backyard in the alley.” We also got a phone call from someone who reported seeing a coyote on SW Frontenac between 39th and 40th, headed east, around 4 pm. Our most recent round of sighting reports was Gatewood-centric, too. Remember that as advised by wildlife experts, best thing to do if you see one is to try your hardest to scare it away.

West Seattle Thursday: School open houses; Whale Trail volunteering; poker @ Feedback….

January 29, 2015 at 11:32 am | In West Seattle news, Wildlife, WS miscellaneous | 2 Comments

Thanks to Gary Jones for the series of bald-eagle photos (mature and juvenile) from Alki (taken in this past Monday’s sunshine) – we’re mingling them with highlights for today/tonight, from the WSB West Seattle Event Calendar:

HOLY FAMILY SCHOOL OPEN HOUSE: 1:30-3 pm, Holy Family Bilingual Catholic School‘s having an open house for prospective parents. (20th/Roxbury)

KINDERGARTEN TOURS AT LAFAYETTE: If you don’t have a reservation, call fast! 1:45 pm today. RSVP info’s in our listing. (California/Lander)

VOLUNTEER NIGHT FOR THE WHALE TRAIL: 6:30 pm at C & P Coffee Company (WSB sponsor), come see what you can do to help, in the weeks and months ahead – details here. (5612 California SW)

SEATTLE LUTHERAN HS OPEN HOUSE: 7 pm tonight, visit Seattle Lutheran High School (WSB sponsor) and find out what J-Term is all about, among other things. Here’s our preview. (41st/Genesee)

CARD NIGHT: 7 pm (signups earlier), 2nd week for Seattle Poker Open (must be a member or buy a pass) at Feedback Lounge (WSB sponsor) in Morgan Junction – details in our listing. (6451 California SW)

ALL OF THE ABOVE IS JUST THE BEGINNING … options and opportunities for tonight, tomorrow, and beyond, are browsable right now on our calendar.

Some Puget Sound seabird species ‘may be turning the corner’ in a good way, 7-year analysis suggests

January 20, 2015 at 4:38 pm | In Environment, Seen at sea, West Seattle news, Wildlife | 5 Comments

(All photos in this story are by Mark Wangerin. Above, rhinoceros auklet)
A glimmer of good news about the health of Puget Sound and some of its wildlife. This news release arrived via NOAA, but much of the work was done by volunteers:

A new analysis of seven years of bird sightings by volunteer birdwatchers from the Seattle Audubon Society has found positive trends in several Puget Sound seabird species that had been in historic decline.

(Common loon)
The study tracked the occurrence of 18 seabird species at 62 sites around Puget Sound and found increased presence of 14 species, including cormorants, loons, rhinoceros auklets, and harlequin ducks. It also documented local hotspots for certain species, which may reflect especially important habitat or prey the birds depend on.

(Harlequin duck)
“This means that all other things being equal, if someone goes out now they’re more likely to see these birds than they would have been seven years ago,” said Eric Ward, an ecologist at NOAA Fisheries’ Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle and lead author of the research.

Many seabird species are thought to have declined around Puget Sound since the 1960s and 1970s but the new results suggest the trends have turned up for many species.

Click to read the rest of Some Puget Sound seabird species ‘may be turning the corner’ in a good way, 7-year analysis suggests…

VIDEO: Signs of hope for sea stars? West Seattle undersea sightings

January 18, 2015 at 3:04 pm | In West Seattle news, Wildlife | 9 Comments

On another mostly gray, rainy day, following a stormy night, here’s a view that’s bright in two ways: Colorful undersea creatures recorded by “Diver Laura” James in the area known as the “junkyard” – and as you’ll see if you watch it, she found some sea stars:

We saw numerous young sunflower stars in the shallows, far more than I was expecting. There was a healthy medium-sized one in the 40’ depth range as well, so this is a change for the positive. Sunflower stars have been all but extirpated at many of our regular dive sites. It is still winter underwater, so we will have to wait until fall to see the real impact (how many babies show up and how many survive) The majority of the sea stars that were lost in the wasting disease are the types that spawn in the spring to mid summer. The babies will then be in the larval stage and float around in the current before they land and start growing. Baby sunflower stars start with 5 arms and then start growing pairs of additional arms, which is why you see uneven arms in the videos. That isn’t because they’ve lost limbs, it means they are growing :)

Many of the stars in the video other than the young sunflower stars and the mottled stars (there were a few) were species that were not as impacted by the wasting disease, such as Leather stars, so it isn’t a surprise to find them there. We did not see any sand stars, pink spiny stars, pisaster (ochre stars) or morning sun stars, but I’m crossing my fingers come spring/summer.

VIDEO: Alki rally, march urges freedom for Lolita, last surviving captive Puget Sound killer whale

January 17, 2015 at 3:19 pm | In West Seattle news, West Seattle people, Wildlife | 11 Comments

(WSB photos/video by Patrick Sand)
A gathering this afternoon around West Seattle’s replica of a powerful symbol of human freedom was organized in hopes of winning freedom for a fellow mammal held captive thousands of miles away:

Taken from her family and her Puget Sound home more than 40 years ago, the orca known as Lolita (originally Tokitae), a member of L-Pod, has spent all that time in a tank at the Miami Seaquarium. Of the dozens of killer whales captured all those years ago, she is the last survivor. This afternoon’s Alki gathering was in support of a larger rally in Miami, stepping up the pressure for Lolita to be “retired” and returned home.

From Alki Statue of Liberty Plaza, advocates, many with signs, headed on a one-mile march along the beach – here’s our video:

We estimated at least 150 supporters here; MiamiHerald.com estimates a thousand participants at today’s rally there. They heard from Howard Garrett of the Whidbey Island-based Orca Network, describing the plan already proposed for reintroducing Lolita to the wild via a sea pen in the San Juans. It’s not new, but there is a potential milestone driving the new attention – a federal ruling expected this month on whether Lolita will be officially included in the listing of endangered Southern Resident Killer Whales. That would not guarantee freedom for her, but could at least step up the pressure. According to the Miami Herald, the Seaquarium says flatly she’s not for sale and shouldn’t be freed. Meantime, back at Alki, Lolita’s supporters came from all age groups:

Advocates said that other support rallies were planned in San Diego, Los Angeles, Colorado Springs, Germany, and the UK.

Rally/march/paddle in West Seattle this Saturday to urge freedom for last captive Puget Sound orca

January 15, 2015 at 7:39 pm | In West Seattle news, Wildlife | 13 Comments

Even as the number of Puget Sound’s Southern Resident Killer Whale population hovers at a dangerously low level, one of the group’s members remains thousands of miles away, captive in a tank. Tokitae is the last surviving SRKW from those captured decades ago; she has been at the Miami Seaquarium for 44 years, performing as “Lolita.” This Saturday from coast to coast, wildlife advocates will demonstrate in support of setting her free and returning her home to Puget Sound. Here in Seattle, the big gathering is a march for about a mile along Alki, starting at 1:15 pm Saturday (January 17th); meet at Alki Statue of Liberty Plaza (61st/Alki) at 1 – more info in our calendar listing. (Photo via Wikimedia)

P.S. Thanks to Steve for the tip on this – you also can paddle along the route in support – that group will leave Don Armeni Boat Ramp (1222 Harbor SW) at noon.

West Seattle coyotes: Heads up for backyard chicken-keepers

January 12, 2015 at 6:18 pm | In Coyotes, West Seattle news, Wildlife | 29 Comments

Check on your chickens, urban farmers. Both of today’s coyote reports mention backyard birds. Dan at 37th/Holden [map] says a coyote came into his yard today and got two of his four chickens, normally kept in a chain-link-surrounded enclosure, but let out to “free range” in the daytime, and it happened while he turned his attention away from a bit. We also heard from Janis, who says she saw a coyote at 2 pm at California/Southern [map]: “Was alerted by the chickens making noise.” Both of those locations are in Gatewood, as is a sighting on New Year’s Day that we still had in queue – Belinda saw one that day, going “down the sidewalk looking in yards in the 6500 block of 40th Ave SW.” [map]

P.S. Our usual “coexisting with coyotes” advice link includes, toward the bottom, advice on protecting poultry.

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