Fauntleroy ‘Boulevard’ plan update: Community meeting set for September 23rd

August 20, 2014 at 6:21 pm | In Transportation, Triangle, West Seattle news | 21 Comments

The date is now set for the promised community open house about the Fauntleroy Way SW Boulevard Project in The Triangle, currently in “early design,” tentatively scheduled for construction late next year if city leaders approve project funding: 5-7 pm Tuesday, September 23rd, is the date for that communitywide discussion of the project, proposed for Fauntleroy Way SW between 35th and Alaska. SDOT’s Maribel Cruz tells WSB they’ve had briefings in recent weeks with:

· Seattle Pedestrian Advisory Board
· Seattle Bicycle Advisory Board
· Freight Advisory Board
· Washington State Ferries
· West Seattle Transportation Coalition
· West Seattle Bike Connections
· West Seattle Junction Association

We were at the WSTC/WSBC briefing last month, along with one member of each of those groups. No major new details emerged, but the question that arose in comments on our July 15th report, “what about the Trader Joe’s onstreet loading zone?” was asked, and the reply was that they’re still discussing options. As a “boulevard,” that section of Fauntleroy will have “no loading zones and no parking,” the project team said.

Background on the project, as well as details of its status, are on the official SDOT webpage. The September 23rd meeting will be at the Senior Center of West Seattle (Oregon/California).

21 Comments

  1. The illustration looks pretty nice. Dedicated bike lane that is seperate from auto traffic is a nice touch. I wish all streets were built for that. Fauntleroy doesnt need street parking. Park on one of the side streets. Trader Joes also doesnt need a load zone, they have two parking lots. — PLEASE NO MEDIAN BARRIER — center turn lane please<<

    Comment by Brian — 8:36 pm August 20, 2014 #

  2. Isn’t the loading zone at Trader Joe’s used for deliveries? A delivery truck won’t fit through either parking lot.

    Comment by Question — 10:05 pm August 20, 2014 #

  3. Another make-work project that is part of the political class/public sector union spoils system. Complete with a “community” meeting to get public input, although no one here asked for such a project or had anything to do with it.

    Comment by JoAnne — 10:49 pm August 20, 2014 #

  4. This looks wonderful. I wish this project was already started.

    Comment by Quiz — 11:21 pm August 20, 2014 #

  5. What on earth does it mean that “they’re still discussing options”? Millions and millions of dollars get spent drawing pretty pictures before addressing such a key functionality?
    .
    I think it means that they’ll design all this pretty stuff and then route the bike lane west before the Trader Joe’s.
    .
    It would be interesting to hear from TJ’s, but I doubt that TJ put the store there, with a delivery zone in front, without some sort of understanding with the city to assure they’d have access for the delivery trucks.
    .

    Comment by Community Member — 6:38 am August 21, 2014 #

  6. Finally!!! This will totally transform the entry into West Seattle. Instead of feeling like you are simply driving the level part of the bridge, you will have arrived in a vibrant, walkable neighborhood shopping area. Love everything about this plan.

    Comment by Triangle Neighbor — 9:00 am August 21, 2014 #

  7. Center turn lane would be great. In the interim, I wish they would just put some K rail up the entire center line from the west seattle bridge to Alaska. No more turns blocking traffic!

    Comment by Jeff — 9:16 am August 21, 2014 #

  8. Seems like a big waste to me. All this for just a couple block stretch of Fauntleroy just to have it merge into 1 lane again after Alaska? the benefit does not outweigh the wasted dollars here. Of course the design looks nice and everything, but you would think there are more important things to spend this money on. Remember these projects when they start saying they need more money from your property taxes, car tabs, etc…

    Comment by 4thGenWS — 9:28 am August 21, 2014 #

  9. They can help themselves to our tax dollars on this one. I like it.

    Comment by lux — 9:45 am August 21, 2014 #

  10. As a year round biker since 1988 I’m not a fan of having the bike lane and pedestrian walkway next to each other. It never fails that walkers take up the entire walkway/bike lane even with signage. This forces me to ride in the street. Take Alki and Green lake as a perfect example.
    I feel very uncomfortable going even a slow 12-15 miles per hour past a walker that may turn at any moment without looking.

    Comment by John — 1:20 pm August 21, 2014 #

  11. yes, Question- that question has been brought up every time this story comes up and I’ve never heard an answer. Maybe someone from TJ’s should go to the meeting in Sept.

    (or maybe TJ’s can load from the turn lane in the middle of the road, like every other delivery/ moving truck does on Avalon in the midst of all the apartment buildings. seems safe, right?)

    Comment by sam-c — 1:50 pm August 21, 2014 #

  12. The answer IS, that the city is talking with them. Sorry if that’s not clear. The project is not even halfway designed yet. Perhaps they will have it worked out by then. It’s been a few weeks since the briefing I mentioned.

    Comment by WSB — 1:57 pm August 21, 2014 #

  13. I understand that they are talking, discussing options.
    .
    What puzzles is this picture I am getting where it seems like the city is spending millions of dollars on design work and holding community meetings before identifying their design constraints.
    .
    Perhaps I am mistaken, and there are essentially no design constraints, because multiple acceptable alternatives have been identified, and it’s just a matter of choosing the best alternative. Ok, then, they could say that.

    Comment by Community Member — 4:41 pm August 21, 2014 #

  14. So the projects design is not even halfway done ? do we have a dollar number on what has been spent on this project as of today ? is there a limit to what they will be spending on design ? can’t figure build cost until design is done. With the constant changing and recent sale of properties along that section of road it seems to me that the city should have waited a few more years on this project and money spent this far has been greatly wasted do to new build up in near future. Starting to look like open check book project. Very expensive way to do business.

    Comment by wetone — 9:22 am August 22, 2014 #

  15. I don’t get it has there been some kind of major public out cry from the Westseattle community to do this or did the City just wake up one morning and say “Hey let’s spend a bunch of money we don’t have on a made up project and all our design buddies a bunch of money to draw pretty pictures” I don’t get it

    Comment by Rob — 2:00 pm August 22, 2014 #

  16. Yes, the boulevard proposal has been out there for at least six years, championed by local community and business leaders. We first wrote about it in 2008; that’s the same year that local reps made a presentation to the City Council:
    .
    http://westseattleblog.com/2008/09/details-new-vision-for-coordinating-junction-development-improvements
    .
    I can’t speak to earlier proposals, as ’08 was our first full year of doing this. – TR

    Comment by WSB — 2:30 pm August 22, 2014 #

  17. this project isn’t just “make-work;” it’s a necessity. the city needs to mitigate traffic flow through the triangle, especially in light of all the development that is already underway – and more that is slated.
    .
    it should be painfully obvious by now that developers have no interest in how traffic gets to their businesses, nor is it their role to do so. that is the city’s job. we, the people of west seattle, should ensure that our community is accessible and functional for all, and we should gladly fund that effort.
    .
    in my opinion, street planning and development to and through west seattle’s front door has been woefully ignored by our business leaders and elected officials.

    Comment by redblack — 10:56 am August 23, 2014 #

  18. Hear! Hear! Redblack.

    Comment by Friend O'Dinghus — 7:33 pm August 23, 2014 #

  19. @redblack: What do you mean by “mitigate” traffic? Reduce? Constrict? More residents require more movement, not less. Not sure I get your point.

    Comment by pjmanley — 11:23 am August 24, 2014 #

  20. So are the curb lanes for parking or lanes for travel? If they are for parking welcome to the island you’ll never be able to leave.

    Comment by Mud — 7:02 am August 25, 2014 #

  21. As a sometimes bike commuter I also am concerned about the bike and pedestrian lanes being next to each other. Unless there is a barrier between the two its not safe for the cyclist nor the pedestrian. Also, the ‘curb’ lane, will pedestrians crossing the bike path to get to/from cars and buses? How will that work?
    I wonder how it would work if the bike lanes were shifted into the middle of the road, adjacent to the turn lane.

    Comment by au — 4:03 pm August 27, 2014 #

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