Julie

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Viewing 25 posts - 376 through 400 (of 430 total)
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  • in reply to: RANT: THEN VS. THAN #636556

    Julie
    Member

    “I’m peeked….” rather than “I’m piqued….” (which means something quite different from “I’m peaked.”)

    …and I think we’ve lost the battle on “begging the question”, which used to mean a kind of logical fallacy (petitio principii) in which the supposed evidence supporting the conclusion requires the same proof as the conclusion. (For example, “The buses are overcrowded because they’re too full.”)

    But “beg the question” now seems to mean just “call for the question”.

    Language evolves, but is it evolving in a useful way?

    in reply to: More bus service for west Seattle? #635723

    Julie
    Member

    P.S. You’d have been riding it by now; it would have opened last December. Imagine–public transit without being stuck in traffic on a crowded bus! Instead, we get to wait until 2011 to get more buses, which will be crowded and stuck in traffic. That’s better, isn’t it?

    in reply to: More bus service for west Seattle? #635722

    Julie
    Member

    It did pass here–3 times! But the opponents got Mayor Gridlock to keep us voting until they got the result they wanted….

    in reply to: Rapid Ride Route and Benefits #634644

    Julie
    Member

    “Rapid” it won’t be, but one very good thing about it will be a shorter time between buses–10 to 15 minutes during the day. That will help.

    I doubt it will avoid impeding traffic flow.

    in reply to: August primary ballots are in the mail #632465

    Julie
    Member

    Also, I do hope some people might note my separated post explaining why Jason Osgood is better than just “not Sam Reed” as you posted.

    https://westseattleblog.com/blog/forum/topic.php?id=1724&replies=1

    It’s important because I understand Dow Constantine (for whom I have great respect) unwittingly seems to have passed on some incorrect information about Mr. Osgood, possibly costing him some financial support from the 34th Dems:

    http://www.washblog.com/story/2008/8/15/19208/8420

    in reply to: August primary ballots are in the mail #632464

    Julie
    Member

    Ken, thank you very much indeed for the votingforjudges site link. I find the judges, usually, to be the toughest choices to make because it’s time-consuming to gather the information about the candidates. That site does an excellent job of collecting lots of basic relevant information in one easy-to-navigate location. I think I did a better job choosing judges on this ballot than on any previously, because I had this information.

    Thanks, again!

    in reply to: August primary ballots are in the mail #632455

    Julie
    Member
    in reply to: dreaming of safe biking #633973

    Julie
    Member

    CountingCoup, I did understand that you weren’t saying the Bike Project was like the separate paths WSMom was wishing for. My comment was directed at TR, because I was hoping she knew about something I didn’t. If there’s any such possibility, I want to know about it so I can support it!

    (BTW, I also support the city bike plans (with reservations about whether sharrows might be a waste of money), however inadequate. Perfection is the enemy of the good.)

    in reply to: dreaming of safe biking #633971

    Julie
    Member

    TR, I’m not seeing any specific separated bike path planned for West Seattle–all I’m seeing is shared roadways, climbing lanes, and sharrows. These parts of the plan may indeed be helpful to some kinds of bicyclists (although I’m dubious about the sharrows), but they’re not at all what WSMom is talking about.

    Can you point to something I’m missing?

    in reply to: dreaming of safe biking #633965

    Julie
    Member

    YES!!! I drool over the solutions from Copenhagen and similarly enlightened (mostly European) cities noted by Alan Durning of the Sightline Institute in his “Bicycle Neglect” series:

    http://daily.sightline.org/daily_score/archive/2007/10/23/even-more-of-what-201cbike-friendly201d-looks-like-bicycle-neglect-11

    I’m not willing to pit my comparatively fragile human body against behemoths driven by cell-phone users–or even SmartCars driven by attentive drivers. It’s not a fair contest.

    And for people who think we can’t do bikes here in Seattle because of the hills, I’d point out there are hybrid electric bikes that can give a boost to those of us not athletic enough to get up the hills.

    I’d pay in a heartbeat for real, separated, safe bikeways. “Sharrows” reassure me not one bit.

    in reply to: School needs 2 pallets #633329

    Julie
    Member

    Thanks, Bayou! We drove by, and actually found a pile just around the corner on 12th, labeled “Free Wood”, between La Mexicana, (which had pallets, but they clearly were still using them), and a construction company whose name didn’t stick in my head. We found two usable ones in the pile. So your tip was helpful! Thank you!

    in reply to: Barking Dogs and MYOB’ing #628723

    Julie
    Member

    I would like to express my appreciation for my very considerate neighbors who are diligent about keeping their dogs from barking!

    in reply to: Summer Reading #632401

    Julie
    Member

    About once a decade, I reread:

    War and Peace

    The Lord of the Rings

    Jane Austen

    I’m also due to reread the Foundation series.

    I randomly reread others, especially children’s and YA books which have a special place in my heart (yes, Milne, definitely! and Edith Nesbit).

    Ken, you’re cruel!

    in reply to: Summer Reading #632396

    Julie
    Member

    My library request queue was shrinking–now it’s growing again!

    in reply to: Summer Reading #632395

    Julie
    Member

    I loved the beginning of Shadow of the Wind. It disappointed me in the follow-through, though. It turned into a rather ordinary mystery. I felt the author didn’t really have the courage of his convictions to carry through a beautiful premise.

    I felt the same way about Smilla’s Sense of Snow; it seemed something very other-worldly was going on, but it kinda petered out into ordinariness.

    But the scene early on in Shadow of the Wind where the boy goes to the city of lost books–that was beautiful!

    in reply to: Summer Reading #632386

    Julie
    Member

    Jeannie, I discovered Susan Palwick last year. Have you read any of hers? From your other recommendations, I think you might like her. I first found Shelter, and I think I still like it best, but so far I like all I’ve read. Shelter takes place in near-future San Francisco–artificial intelligence is a main theme. Fred Rogers (yes, Mr. Rogers) is a character! Beautiful characters. The Necessary Beggar is my next favorite.

    in reply to: Summer Reading #632385

    Julie
    Member

    Ken!!! Another Cherryh addict! Dare I tell you that Conspirator is due out in March, and Ms. Cherryh is at work on Deceiver? But I’m putting dibs on as soon as we’re within the legal time limit at SPL.

    One is overcome to encounter a fellow; do have some tea (it’s quite safe ;) )

    Cyteen II: Regenesis is scheduled for publication in January, also.

    Don’t let your gf hide your library card: it’s the key to all the fabulous online resources on SPL’s website: The OED for free! Oxford Reference! And I find the online Safari tech books invaluable…. best of all, no fines!

    KS Robinson: I was on tenterhooks until 60 Days and Counting was published last fall. Gobbled it up, and… wonder what he’s going to do next?

    Hmmm. If you manage to flesh out the HP SF shelf, perhaps I’ll have to start hanging out there–seems we share some enthusiasms.

    I didn’t mention the only SF I’ve read this summer, because it was a little disappointing, despite a promising premise: Rollback, by Robert Sawyer. Many years after an ET encoded message has been cracked and answered, an answer to the answer is received…in a new code. The premise is, the original code cracker is very old, and is offered a rejuvenation procedure. To avoid spoiling, I’ll not tell what happens next.

    Jeannie, yes, The Sparrow is brilliant (and harrowing). I recommend it to all who’ve not read it. I have mixed feelings about the sequel, Children of God. Have you read A Thread of Grace? It’s on my list.

    Oh, dear. Well, I asked for recommendations; kind of like an addict asking for more drugs. Can’t wait for more!

    in reply to: RANT: People who think WS is far away #632039

    Julie
    Member

    I always tell my visitors they’ll need their passports to get across the bridge ;)

    in reply to: You can still vote for Edwards! #631413

    Julie
    Member

    Environment and healthcare. Obama is weaker on both of these than Edwards.

    But Obama is stronger on them than McCain.

    in reply to: Bad behavior at Lincoln Park #631263

    Julie
    Member

    Mike, I’ve been mulling this phenomenon over, too (the notion that one is entitled to break a law because it’s a stupid law/it’s just a little over the limit/I’ve never hurt anyone/it’s my God-given right to…etc.)

    I notice people resent most (and are most likely to flout) laws they regard as “minor”. Relatively few people complain about laws against murder, but lots of people get their noses out of joint about leash laws/limits on driver behaviour/smoking bans. People argue for just using “common sense” (which is way less reliable than people like to believe) instead of laws, but surely that applies to murder, as well? And if people were using common courtesy, or “common sense”, we’d not have to pass the laws in the first place. We have the laws because not everyone uses courtesy and sense.

    Thoughtful skepticism of authority is a healthy attitude–but what we’re seeing in this cavalier disregard of laws is, rather than thoughtful skepticism, merely an attempt to justify selfish behaviour.

    I don’t know what the most effective way is to address it.

    in reply to: NW Art & Frame Rude to Mother & Baby #631058

    Julie
    Member

    ntvnw999, it certainly can be frustrating trying to juggle a baby and shop at the same time–it does wear down your patience, and it takes an extra effort to behave graciously, regardless of the behavior of those around you. I’m sorry you were having a hard day. It really will get easier when your child gets older (keep in mind, it will get harder, first!)

    I do think one might reasonably have expected the person in the frame department, whether customer or employee, to have come to your aid in retrieving the broken frame, although outrage that he did not seems misplaced.

    But I’m disturbed by your apparent assumption that you’re not required to compensate for your accidents. The principle stands, “You break it, you bought it,” even if the breakage is accidental (most breakage is accidental). When we accidentally cause injury to people or property, we’re responsible, no matter how trivial, no matter how great. We apologize, and we make our best effort to correct the injury.

    in reply to: Yarn for Knitting? #627727

    Julie
    Member

    Another Port Gamble tip for fiber arts fun: the lovely little Port Gamble Historic Museum has just a few handmade lace collars and at least one beautiful needlelace fan, as I recall.

    Didn’t know about Knit in Public day! Hmmm… I think we should have a “Lace in Public” day….

    in reply to: Teacher Gifts?? #626506

    Julie
    Member

    I am a teacher, and I’d like to add to this discussion that, really and truly, the very best teacher appreciation gifts are simply notes from students expressing specifically what they appreciate. Second best are notes from parents expressing what they appreciate (not always the same things as their students!) I do also enjoy gifts students themselves put some effort into, whether successful by adult standards or not; it’s always touching when a student finds time to make something because they want to share it with a teacher. All the Starbucks/B&N, etc, gift cards in the world, kind and generous as they are, don’t hold a candle to a genuine, heartfelt “thank you” from a child.

    Now, please, I don’t say this to make everybody think they must force their child to make something or write an epistle. Just encourage good manners with a standard “thank you” note.

    in reply to: Cyclists #623776

    Julie
    Member

    Vincent, I’m not sure people really are more critical of cyclists who break the law than they are of motorists who break the law. We’ve had some pretty heated discussions on this blog about motorists ignoring rules, too! Maybe you’re right, and people do hold cyclists to a higher standard; but maybe it’s that cyclists have less “insulation” between themselves and a critic than a motorist does, and so is more aware of the criticism? I think a lot of drivers are completely unaware of expressed criticism. Might be harder to ignore the critics when you’re more exposed, as on a bike–and the criticism may seem more threatening, too.

    in reply to: Two recommendation requests from your hosts #623694

    Julie
    Member

    WSB, our solution to the blinds problem is to order a repair kit from fixmyblinds.com. They’re in Colorado Springs, but give very good and prompt service. The instructions come with the kit and are easy to follow. It does take longer than having someone else do it, but it saves a ton of money! I found fixmyblinds.com after finding out what it would cost to have ours restrung.

    For dentists, you might consider Dr. Colin Craig, although he’s in Burien. I appreciate the gentle and explanatory–albeit firm–reminders from him and his assistants, rather than lectures.

Viewing 25 posts - 376 through 400 (of 430 total)