Flesh eating spiders?!

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  • #817495

    sbre
    Participant

    Last night I found a huge herd/flock/gaggle/hoard/cluster of itsy-bitsy-teeny-tiny yellow baby(?) spiders all huddled together (about 300 I would guess) on our back deck right along side the door jamb, when I pointed it out to my wife and began smashing them my wife started yelling…”NO, NO, DON’T TOUCH THEM, THOSE ARE FLESH EATING SPIDERS!!!!” and ran for the hills.

    “Well, they’re dead ones now!” I replied. And was very happy to wake up this morning with all my flesh in tact.

    Is there such a critter and are they found around here?

    Inquiring minds want to know….Thanks

    #824381

    Ms. Sparkles
    Participant

    Only if you contract necrotising fasciitis after being bitten:

    http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/weird-news/spider-bite-cost-hairdresser-finger-4335790

    #824382

    squareeyes
    Participant

    And I thought I was dramatic at the sight of a spider or 300.

    Which reminds me, it’s time to do my annual check for, and removal of, spider egg sacs on the sunny side of the house.

    #824383

    anonyme
    Participant

    In the sense that all spiders eat flesh (usually insect) – yes. In the horror story sense, absolutely not. Araneus diadematus spiderlings have been hatching the last few days. They are yellowish with a black spot on the abdomen. These are the spiders commonly seen in orb webs throughout your garden in the summer and fall. Highly, highly beneficial creatures, and completely harmless. Well, mostly; if you SOMEHOW managed to get bitten AND had an unusual allergy to that particular spiders venom, you MIGHT have a reaction. Not exactly a cause for alarm.

    BTW, spiders do not “suck” blood. Fangs are used to inject venom and manipulate food prey – they are not used like syringes. Chemicals in the venom semi-liquefy the flesh so that it can be masticated.

    #824384

    datamuse
    Participant

    No, and what would you kill baby spiders for?? Geez.

    A whole bunch of them recently launched their new lives from my mailbox. I left them alone. So did the mail carrier.

    #824385

    anonyme
    Participant

    I’m with you, datamuse. There are a bunch of newbies on my front gate, so I’ve been going in and out very carefully so as not to disturb them. They’ll disperse in a day or two. They were so cute this afternoon, dancing around and exploring their new territory. Then the sun went behind a cloud, and they all gathered together in little clusters. Let’s face it – spiders are adorable.

    #824386

    datamuse
    Participant

    There were more of them on my mailbox today…and no mail. Hmmm. :D

    #824387

    trickycoolj
    Participant

    Changed my patio chairs and brought the old ones in the garage. Next day I had hundreds of webs 4 feet long between the chair and my garbage bins. I looked closer and there were hundreds of baby spiders! Tis the season! They keep the bugs away.

    #824388

    sbre
    Participant

    Thank you all for your insight, exactly what I was hoping for.

    The ONLY reason I killed this group was because they were on the door jamb leading into our kitchen, any other place and I would have sat and admired them and ‘yes dear’d my wife’s antics until I learned the truth.

    But that close to an entry way, no way!

    #824389

    ttt
    Participant

    You are not from washington, are you? Then you would know that spiders that live hear are good, not evil. They kill the bad bugs we do not want. Stop killing baby spiders. Stop freaking out. They are just spiders for heaven sake!

    #824390

    datamuse
    Participant

    Heh heh, a few years back we had some hatch on our back deck. I’d go out there and watch them as they drifted away. Just like Charlotte’s Web.

    My husband, on the other hand, HATES spiders and refused to go out there until they were gone. :D

    #824391

    anonyme
    Participant

    Araneus are outdoor spiders, and will not willingly come indoors. They might get caught on your clothing or an object and inadvertently travel inside, but they would not survive. I would just take a stick and gently wrap the web – with baby spiders in it – like cotton candy, then place the stick in the yard someplace where the wee darlings could do some good.

    #824392

    Jeannie
    Participant

    Datamuse, you beat me to the punch. I was going to mention Charlotte’s Web, too. I suggest anyone wary of spiders reread this lovely book (even if you’re not a kid) for renewed appreciation of these tiny critters.

    #824393

    herongrrrl
    Participant

    Anonyme, aren’t these the little guys who hang out in a tight ball but scatter everywhere if the least bit disturbed? Just thinking it would be hard to move them in the web if they’re doing that. When I was a kid, I was (unpleasantly!) surprised many times when I blundered into one of their nests. I love and appreciate spiders for what they do, I just don’t want them ON me! :)

    #824394

    anonyme
    Participant

    herongrrrl…probably. But they only scatter within their little area, then cluster back together. And they’re only there in groups for a few days at most before they broaden their horizons. This is essential, as they are carnivorous after all. Once they begin to feed, brothers and sisters are fair game, so they spread out as best they can.

    #824395

    RarelyEver
    Participant

    Yes, spiders are useful and great creatures, but despite therapy I still have a phobia. I’m already freaking out that due to the non-existent winter, the ones in my yard are going to be the size of puppies by the end of summer. *shudders*

    #824396

    JKB
    Participant

    I have an arrangement where the spiders are allowed outside but not inside. Some cheat the rule by being invisible. I know about those because they leave cobwebs, but tolerating them seems a reasonable compromise.

    #824397

    JanS
    Participant

    RarelyEver…I’m with you. I can sort of tolerate/look the other way if they’re inside and small. But over my head, in bed, or those giant things that like to take baths in my tub? Nope, nope, nope!

    #824398

    anonyme
    Participant

    rarely – the winter has nothing to do with the size of the spiders; the “puppies” would be there anyway come autumn. Most spiders can easily endure freezing temperatures – otherwise, Minnesota would have no spiders.

    I can sympathize with your fear. I had severe arachnophobia (could not look at a drawing of a circle with eight lines coming out of it) but designed my own program to work through it. It worked too well – I ended up the ‘parent’ of 600 tarantulas, some black widows, and other assorted species of interest. So, there is hope…

    #824399

    RarelyEver
    Participant

    anonyme – Respect! How did you do that??

    #824400

    waynster
    Participant

    Heck back in the day we would capture the biggest baddest spiders the ones as big as horses well half dollars anyway then we would hold spider fights….not once did we see any flesh eaters if we did it would have been mouse vs flesh eaters…boys will be boys and we didn’t smoke any pot for a few more years yet dang it all…lmao….

    #824401

    anonyme
    Participant

    RE – very, very gradual desensitization – starting with the drawing I mentioned. Add details to the drawing, move on to simple diagrams. A friend had a tarantula, so I hadn’t been able to visit his home for a while. I went over and stood in the doorway where I could see the spider from 20 ft. away, and progressed from there. The big orb-weavers in your yard exhibit some nail-biting entertainment in the form of mating rituals come fall.

    But what helped most was simple education. I started reading about spiders (NO photos – oh hell no) and became utterly fascinated. The jumping spiders are especially interesting. It really is true that knowledge dispels fear.

    Good luck!

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