West Seattle Event Calendar

*NOTE: We’ve ramped the calendar back to some level of usefulness, as more events continue being planned, both online and in-person, so let us know if you have something coming up that’s open to the public!*

Want your West Seattle event/meeting/etc. to be listed here? Please send basic info to westseattleblog@gmail.com – thanks! Please include full details AS PLAIN TEXT IN YOUR E-MAIL, *not* in an attached doc/poster/flyer/etc. A web link for more info helps too. Thank you!

USING THE CALENDAR: Mouse over any entry to show the “plus” sign at right; click it to expand the item for more info without leaving this page; click “read more” for the FULL listing./question.

Apr
28
Tue
Racists Anonymous @ Admiral UCC Church
Apr 28 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Racists Anonymous: A New Tool for Anti-Racist Organizing
11-12 Tuesdays, 4320 SW Hill St, West Seattle

We have chosen to use the 12-Step Principles as tools for engaging internalized racial superiority and systemic racism because they promise to affirm the worthiness of all people while calling people to deep reflection on the beliefs and behaviors that deny this promise. This is not a space for experts, professionals, or those who want to demonstrate their “wokeness”; this is a place for those who are ready to admit that internalized racism is stunting their emotional growth and limiting their freedom. We gather to find renewed strength to resist our learned biases and nurture our hope for social transformation.

For more information, go to: www.admiralchurch.org/ra

Apr
29
Wed
Dementia Roundtable Support Group at Quail Park
Apr 29 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Dementia Round Table Support Group

Have you been wondering when you should learn more?Knowledge is power and we invite you to join us at our monthly support groups that cover topics about safety, socialization & nutritional well-being for those that have been formally diagnosed with dementia or other memory concerns.

Meets on the last Wednesday of each month 4:00 – 5:00 pm

May
1
Fri
Lights: A ‘Zine Launch @ Paper Boat Booksellers
May 1 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Pleasure Boat Studios, a West Seattle nonprofit literary press, invites you to celebrate the launch of a new ‘zine–Lights.

The event will feature a short story reading by local writer John Christopher Nelson as well as complimentary wine and nonalcoholic fizzies.

Pleasure Boat Studios is also the publisher of Sugar Mountain, a novel by Alfred Alcorn. Sugar Mountain is the story of a pandemic that started in China.

May
5
Tue
Racists Anonymous @ Admiral UCC Church
May 5 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Racists Anonymous: A New Tool for Anti-Racist Organizing
11-12 Tuesdays, 4320 SW Hill St, West Seattle

We have chosen to use the 12-Step Principles as tools for engaging internalized racial superiority and systemic racism because they promise to affirm the worthiness of all people while calling people to deep reflection on the beliefs and behaviors that deny this promise. This is not a space for experts, professionals, or those who want to demonstrate their “wokeness”; this is a place for those who are ready to admit that internalized racism is stunting their emotional growth and limiting their freedom. We gather to find renewed strength to resist our learned biases and nurture our hope for social transformation.

For more information, go to: www.admiralchurch.org/ra

May
11
Mon
Virtual Toddler Story Time @ The Seattle Public Library on Facebook
May 11 @ 10:30 am – 11:00 am

It is story time! Gather your preschoolers and toddlers to enjoy stories, rhymes, songs and fun with our children’s librarian, Serena.

Location: The Seattle Public Library on Facebook
(Facebook account is not required.)

Virtual Preschool Story Time @ The Seattle Public Library on Facebook
May 11 @ 4:30 pm – 5:00 pm

It is story time! Gather your preschoolers and toddlers to enjoy stories, rhymes, songs and fun with our children’s librarian, Mai.

Location: The Seattle Public Library on Facebook
(Facebook account is not required.)

May
12
Tue
Virtual Preschool Story Time @ The Seattle Public Library on Facebook
May 12 @ 10:30 am – 10:50 am

It is story time! Gather your preschoolers and toddlers to enjoy stories, rhymes, songs and fun with our children’s librarian.

Location: The Seattle Public Library on Facebook
(Facebook account is not required.)

Racists Anonymous @ Admiral UCC Church
May 12 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Racists Anonymous: A New Tool for Anti-Racist Organizing
11-12 Tuesdays, 4320 SW Hill St, West Seattle

We have chosen to use the 12-Step Principles as tools for engaging internalized racial superiority and systemic racism because they promise to affirm the worthiness of all people while calling people to deep reflection on the beliefs and behaviors that deny this promise. This is not a space for experts, professionals, or those who want to demonstrate their “wokeness”; this is a place for those who are ready to admit that internalized racism is stunting their emotional growth and limiting their freedom. We gather to find renewed strength to resist our learned biases and nurture our hope for social transformation.

For more information, go to: www.admiralchurch.org/ra

May
14
Thu
Virtual Pajama Story Time @ The Seattle Public Library on Facebook
May 14 @ 10:30 am – 11:00 am

It is story time! Gather your children to enjoy stories, rhymes, songs and fun with our children’s librarian. All ages welcome.

Location: The Seattle Public Library on Facebook
(Facebook account is not required.)

Virtual Baby Story Time @ The Seattle Public Library on Facebook
May 14 @ 12:30 pm – 1:00 pm

It is story time! Bring your babies (0-12 months) to enjoy stories, rhymes, songs and fun with our children’s librarian.

Location: The Seattle Public Library on Facebook
(Facebook account is not required.)

May
18
Mon
Virtual Toddler Story Time @ The Seattle Public Library on Facebook
May 18 @ 10:30 am – 11:00 am

It is story time! Gather your preschoolers and toddlers to enjoy stories, rhymes, songs and fun with our children’s librarian, Serena.

Location: The Seattle Public Library on Facebook
(Facebook account is not required.)

Virtual Preschool Story Time @ The Seattle Public Library on Facebook
May 18 @ 4:30 pm – 5:00 pm

It is story time! Gather your preschoolers and toddlers to enjoy stories, rhymes, songs and fun with our children’s librarian, Mai.

Location: The Seattle Public Library on Facebook
(Facebook account is not required.)

May
19
Tue
Virtual Preschool Story Time @ The Seattle Public Library on Facebook
May 19 @ 10:30 am – 10:50 am

It is story time! Gather your preschoolers and toddlers to enjoy stories, rhymes, songs and fun with our children’s librarian.

Location: The Seattle Public Library on Facebook
(Facebook account is not required.)

Racists Anonymous @ Admiral UCC Church
May 19 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Racists Anonymous: A New Tool for Anti-Racist Organizing
11-12 Tuesdays, 4320 SW Hill St, West Seattle

We have chosen to use the 12-Step Principles as tools for engaging internalized racial superiority and systemic racism because they promise to affirm the worthiness of all people while calling people to deep reflection on the beliefs and behaviors that deny this promise. This is not a space for experts, professionals, or those who want to demonstrate their “wokeness”; this is a place for those who are ready to admit that internalized racism is stunting their emotional growth and limiting their freedom. We gather to find renewed strength to resist our learned biases and nurture our hope for social transformation.

For more information, go to: www.admiralchurch.org/ra

May
21
Thu
Virtual Pajama Story Time @ The Seattle Public Library on Facebook
May 21 @ 10:30 am – 11:00 am

It is story time! Gather your children to enjoy stories, rhymes, songs and fun with our children’s librarian. All ages welcome.

Location: The Seattle Public Library on Facebook
(Facebook account is not required.)

Virtual Baby Story Time @ The Seattle Public Library on Facebook
May 21 @ 12:30 pm – 1:00 pm

It is story time! Bring your babies (0-12 months) to enjoy stories, rhymes, songs and fun with our children’s librarian.

Location: The Seattle Public Library on Facebook
(Facebook account is not required.)

May
26
Tue
Virtual Preschool Story Time @ The Seattle Public Library on Facebook
May 26 @ 10:30 am – 10:50 am

It is story time! Gather your preschoolers and toddlers to enjoy stories, rhymes, songs and fun with our children’s librarian.

Location: The Seattle Public Library on Facebook
(Facebook account is not required.)

Racists Anonymous @ Admiral UCC Church
May 26 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Racists Anonymous: A New Tool for Anti-Racist Organizing
11-12 Tuesdays, 4320 SW Hill St, West Seattle

We have chosen to use the 12-Step Principles as tools for engaging internalized racial superiority and systemic racism because they promise to affirm the worthiness of all people while calling people to deep reflection on the beliefs and behaviors that deny this promise. This is not a space for experts, professionals, or those who want to demonstrate their “wokeness”; this is a place for those who are ready to admit that internalized racism is stunting their emotional growth and limiting their freedom. We gather to find renewed strength to resist our learned biases and nurture our hope for social transformation.

For more information, go to: www.admiralchurch.org/ra

May
27
Wed
Dementia Roundtable Support Group at Quail Park
May 27 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Dementia Round Table Support Group

Have you been wondering when you should learn more?Knowledge is power and we invite you to join us at our monthly support groups that cover topics about safety, socialization & nutritional well-being for those that have been formally diagnosed with dementia or other memory concerns.

Meets on the last Wednesday of each month 4:00 – 5:00 pm

May
28
Thu
Virtual Pajama Story Time @ The Seattle Public Library on Facebook
May 28 @ 10:30 am – 11:00 am

It is story time! Gather your children to enjoy stories, rhymes, songs and fun with our children’s librarian. All ages welcome.

Location: The Seattle Public Library on Facebook
(Facebook account is not required.)

Virtual Baby Story Time @ The Seattle Public Library on Facebook
May 28 @ 12:30 pm – 1:00 pm

It is story time! Bring your babies (0-12 months) to enjoy stories, rhymes, songs and fun with our children’s librarian.

Location: The Seattle Public Library on Facebook
(Facebook account is not required.)

Jun
6
Sat
Virtual Rainbow Story Time @ The Seattle Public Library on YouTube
Jun 6 @ 10:00 am – 10:30 am

Celebrate PhinneyWood’s Rainbow Hop with special family story times presented by drag entertainer Cookie Couture.

Cookie Couture will read stories and sing songs that are appropriate for ages 7 and under. The titles are: What Riley Wore by Elana K. Arnold, Pink is for Boys by Robb Pearlman, and The Drag Queen Goes Swish, Swish, Swish by Lil Miss Hot Mess.

Seattle drag entertainer & events producer Cookie Couture has gone from drag ingénue to a leading force in the Seattle drag & queer arts communities, hosting & producing various monthly drag shows and dance events, including Sunday School at Beacon Hill venue Clock-Out Lounge, an all-ages, family friendly drag spectacle. When Cookie’s not applying a light dust of make-up to her face, she enjoys spending time with her family, hanging out with her Bulldog & laughing at her own jokes.

This Story Time will be available on The Seattle Public Library’s YouTube channel on Saturday June 6 – Friday June 12.

Jun
10
Wed
Virtual Rainbow Story Time @ The Seattle Public Library on YouTube
Jun 10 @ 10:00 am – 10:30 am

It’s a special Pride Month story time! Gather the whole family to enjoy stories, rhymes, songs and fun with our children’s librarian, Mel and Mai.

This is a virtual event, streaming on YouTube Premiere. It will be available to watch on YouTube through the end of June.

Location: https://www.youtube.com/user/SeattlePublicLibrary

Jun
13
Sat
Virtual Rainbow Story Time @ The Seattle Public Library on YouTube
Jun 13 @ 10:00 am – 10:30 am

Join us to celebrate Pride Month with special family story times presented by Indigenous Drag Storyteller, Hailey Tayathy.

Indigenous Drag Storyteller Hailey will tell Quileute stories and sing songs that are appropriate for ages 7 and under.

This Story Time will be available on The Seattle Public Library’s YouTube channel on Saturday June 13 – Friday June 19.

Location: https://www.youtube.com/user/SeattlePublicLibrary

Jun
20
Sat
Virtual Rainbow Story Time @ The Seattle Public Library on YouTube
Jun 20 @ 10:00 am – 10:25 am

Join us to celebrate Pride Month with special family story times presented by Indigenous Drag Storyteller Mx. Trickster!

Indigenous Drag Storyteller Mx. Trickster tells and sing songs that are appropriate for ages 7 and under. The title is Raven: A Trickster Tale from the Pacific Northwest by Gerald McDermott.

This Story Time will be available on The Seattle Public Library’s YouTube channel on Saturday June 20 –Friday June 26.

Location: https://www.youtube.com/user/SeattlePublicLibrary

Jun
22
Mon
Virtual Rainbow Story Time @ The Seattle Public Library on YouTube
Jun 22 @ 10:00 am – 10:30 am

It’s a special Pride Month story time! Gather the whole family to enjoy stories, rhymes, songs and fun with our children’s librarian, Mel and Mai.

This is a virtual event, streaming on YouTube Premiere. It will be available to watch on YouTube through the end of June.

Location: https://www.youtube.com/user/SeattlePublicLibrary

Jun
24
Wed
Dementia Roundtable Support Group at Quail Park
Jun 24 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Dementia Round Table Support Group

Have you been wondering when you should learn more?Knowledge is power and we invite you to join us at our monthly support groups that cover topics about safety, socialization & nutritional well-being for those that have been formally diagnosed with dementia or other memory concerns.

Meets on the last Wednesday of each month 4:00 – 5:00 pm

Jun
27
Sat
Virtual Rainbow Story Time @ The Seattle Public Library on YouTube
Jun 27 @ 10:00 am – 10:25 am

Join us celebrate Pride Month with Drag entertainer Aleksa Manila, Alexsa will read stories and sing songs that are appropriate for ages 7 and under. The titles are: My Princess Boy by Cheryl Kilodavis and Prince & Knight by Daniel Haack.

This Story Time will be available on The Seattle Public Library’s YouTube channel on Saturday June 27 – Friday July 3.

Location: https://www.youtube.com/user/SeattlePublicLibrary

Jul
29
Wed
Dementia Roundtable Support Group at Quail Park
Jul 29 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Dementia Round Table Support Group

Have you been wondering when you should learn more?Knowledge is power and we invite you to join us at our monthly support groups that cover topics about safety, socialization & nutritional well-being for those that have been formally diagnosed with dementia or other memory concerns.

Meets on the last Wednesday of each month 4:00 – 5:00 pm

Aug
14
Fri
Akwaeke Emezi Discusses “The Death Of Vivek Oji” @ Online (see listing)
Aug 14 @ 6:00 pm – 7:10 pm

Join us to hear award-winning writer Akwaeke Emezi discuss their new novel, a propulsive story of family and friendship that challenges expectations. Registration required.

Click here to register. You will receive a link to the event 1 hour before the event starts.

Akwaeke Emezi will talk with Esmé Weijun Wang. The event is presented in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company. This event is supported by The Seattle Public Library Foundation, author series sponsors the Gary and Connie Kunis Foundation, and Seattle City of Literature. Thanks to media sponsor The Seattle Times.

ABOUT THE BOOK:

What does it mean for a family to lose a child they never really knew?

One afternoon, in a town in southeastern Nigeria, a mother opens her front door to discover her son’s body, wrapped in colorful fabric, at her feet. What follows is the tumultuous, heart-wrenching story of one family’s struggle to understand a child whose spirit is both gentle and mysterious. Raised by a distant father and an understanding but overprotective mother, Vivek suffers disorienting blackouts, moments of disconnection between self and surroundings. As adolescence gives way to adulthood, Vivek finds solace in friendships with the warm, boisterous daughters of the Nigerwives, foreign-born women married to Nigerian men. But Vivek’s closest bond is with Osita, the worldly, high-spirited cousin whose teasing confidence masks a guarded private life. As their relationship deepens—and Osita struggles to understand Vivek’s escalating crisis—the mystery gives way to a heart-stopping act of violence in a moment of exhilarating freedom.

Teeming with unforgettable characters, The Death of Vivek Oji is a dramatic story of loss and transcendence that will move every reader.

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS:

Akwaeke Emezi is the author of the novel Freshwater, which was named a New York Times Notable Book and shortlisted for the PEN/Hemingway Award, the NYPL Young Lions Fiction Award, the Lambda Literary Award, and the Center for Fiction’s First Novel Prize, and longlisted for the International Dublin Literary Award, the Women’s Prize for Fiction, the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction, the Brooklyn Public Library Literary Prize, the Wellcome Book Prize, the Aspen Words Literary Prize, and the VCU Cabell First Novelist Award. Freshwater was also awarded the Otherwise Award and named a Best Book of the Decade by BuzzFeed and a Best Book of the Year by The New Yorker, NPR, and the Chicago Public Library. Emezi’s second book, Pet, was a finalist for the National Book Award for Young People’s Literature. Selected as a 5 Under 35 honoree by the National Book Foundation, Emezi has been profiled by Vogue (for which they were photographed by Annie Leibovitz) and by Vanity Fair as part of “The New Hollywood Guard.” Freshwater has been translated into ten languages and is currently in development as a TV series at FX, with Emezi writing and executive producing with Tamara P. Carter.

Esmé Weijun Wang is the New York Times bestselling author of The Collected Schizophrenias: Essays and the novel The Border of Paradise. She received the Whiting Award in 2018 and was named one of Granta’s Best of Young American Novelists of 2017; she has also received fellowships to Yaddo and the MacDowell Colony. She holds an MFA from the University of Michigan and lives in San Francisco.

Aug
18
Tue
Black Joy And Mindful Movements – A Virtual Event @ Online (see listing)
Aug 18 @ 7:30 pm – 8:00 pm

This is a live streaming event on Seattle Public Library Kids: YouTube channel. Join teen intern, Leeah, for a fun, early-learning program where she will read picture books by Black authors and/or Illustrators, and guide little ones through some mindful movements.

Join teen intern, Leeah, for a fun, early-learning program where she will read picture books by Black authors and/or Illustrators, and guide little ones through some mindful movements. Geared towards kids 8 and under. In partnership with The Bureau of Fearless Ideas.

Aug
24
Mon
Hora Del Cuento Virtual En Español Para Todas Las Habilidades @ Online (see listing)
Aug 24 @ 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm

Para registrarse para estos eventos, contacte a Sandra Urite a The Arc of King County:
206.829.7028 / SUrite@arcofkingcounty.org

¡Únete a The Arc of King County junto a The Seattle Public Library, para una experiencia de cuentos virtual! Compartiremos canciones, libros y actividades de movimiento. Disfruta de este tiempo de cuento interactivo y sensorial desde la comodidad del hogar.

The Arc of King County facilitará la Hora del Cuento en español usando Zoom. Los participantes registrados tendrán la opción de recibir un kit de la Hora del Cuento que incluye: un maraca, una bufanda, y más sorpresas.

Aug
25
Tue
Black Joy And Mindful Movements – A Virtual Event @ Online (see listing)
Aug 25 @ 10:00 am – 10:30 am

This is a live streaming event on Seattle Public Library Kids: YouTube channel. Join teen intern, Ruth, for a fun, early-learning program where she will read picture books by Black authors and/or Illustrators, and guide little ones through some mindful movements.

Join teen intern, Ruth, for a fun, early-learning program where she will read picture books by Black authors and/or Illustrators, and guide little ones through some mindful movements. Geared towards kids 8 and under. In partnership with The Bureau of Fearless Ideas.

Aug
26
Wed
Dementia Roundtable Support Group at Quail Park
Aug 26 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Dementia Round Table Support Group

Have you been wondering when you should learn more?Knowledge is power and we invite you to join us at our monthly support groups that cover topics about safety, socialization & nutritional well-being for those that have been formally diagnosed with dementia or other memory concerns.

Meets on the last Wednesday of each month 4:00 – 5:00 pm

Sep
10
Thu
Words, Writers and Southwest Stories: After the Blast – The Ecological Recovery of Mount St. Helens @ Online (see listing)
Sep 10 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

Journalist and biologist Eric Wagner discusses 40 years of ecological recovery on Mount St. Helens.

Mount St. Helens has been surprising ecologists ever since and in After the Blast Eric Wagner takes readers on a fascinating journey through the blast area and beyond. From fireweed to elk, the plants and animals Franklin saw would not just change how ecologists approached the eruption and its landscape, but also prompt them to think in new ways about how life responds in the face of seemingly total devastation.

Online access to Words, Writers and Southwest Stories: After the Blast – The Ecological Recovery of Mount St. Helens:

https://www.loghousemuseum.org/blog/september-10-words-writers-and-southwest-stories-after-the-blast-the-ecological-recovery-of-mount-st-helens/

‘Words, Writers & Southwest Stories,’ a historically-based speaker series of the Southwest Seattle Historical Society, is offered in partnership with The Southwest Seattle Historical Society and The Seattle Public Library.

Sep
19
Sat
Virtual Seattle Writes: An Ancient Music – Writing with South Asian Ghazals @ Online (see listing)
Sep 19 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Explore the ghazal form of poetry through select readings and writing prompts with Shankar Narayan. Registration required. Click here to register.

Ghazals in South Asia are one of the most popular forms of poetry anywhere. While there has been much analysis of the ghazal’s evolution in English, how the ghazal works as popular art is less accessible to western writers. This class aims to give participants a flavor of that space. In this multi-genre, part-generative, part-analytical class, we’ll listen to versions of ghazals in Urdu, read translations, consider what makes a good ghazal work, and use all that to create our own burning, yearning works. No prior knowledge required — but come ready to engage and to write!

Shankar Narayan explores identity, power, mythology, and technology in a world where the body is flung across borders yet possesses unrivaled power to transcend them. Shankar is a four-time Pushcart Prize nominee and has received awards and fellowships from Kundiman, Hugo House, Jack Straw, Flyway, River Heron, and others. He is a 4Culture grant recipient for Claiming Space, a project to lift the voices of writers of color, and his chapbook, Postcards From the New World, won the Paper Nautilus Debut Series chapbook prize. Shankar draws strength from his global upbringing and from his work at the intersection of technology and civil rights. In Seattle, he awakens to the wonders of Cascadia every day, but his heart yearns east to his other hometown, Delhi. Connect with him at shankarnarayan.net.

We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations.

Oct
17
Sat
Virtual Seattle Reads Presents Tommy Orange @ Online (see listing)
Oct 17 @ 7:00 pm – 8:15 pm

Tommy Orange joins us digitally to discuss Seattle Reads selection There There. He’ll speak with Dr. Christina Roberts, the Director of the Indigenous Peoples Institute at Seattle University.

A limited number of “seats” are available through the digital platform. Registration was required – Event is now full. This event will also be streamed live to The Seattle Public Library’s Facebook page.

Seattle Reads There There is made possible by The Seattle Public Library Foundation, The Wallace Foundation and the Gary and Connie Kunis Foundation, with additional support from sponsors Seattle City of Literature, The Seattle Times, and Vintage Books.

About the Book:

There There is a powerful novel that follows twelve characters from Native communities and explores their connections to one another as each travels to the Big Oakland Powwow.

There is Jacquie Red Feather, newly sober and working to make it back to the family she left behind. Dene Oxendene, who is pulling his life back together after his uncle’s death, has come to work at the powwow to honor his memory. Fourteen-year-old Orvil has come to perform traditional dance for the very first time. Together, this chorus of voices tells of the plight of the urban Native American—grappling with a complex and painful history, with an inheritance of beauty and spirituality, with communion and sacrifice and heroism. Hailed as an instant classic, “There There” is at once poignant and laugh-out-loud funny, utterly contemporary and always unforgettable.

About Tommy Orange:

Tommy Orange is the author of the New York Times bestselling novel There There, a multi-generational, relentlessly paced story about a side of America few of us have ever seen: the lives of urban Native Americans. There There was one of The New York Times Book Review’s 10 Best Books of the Year, and won the Center for Fiction’s First Novel Prize and the Pen/Hemingway Award. There There was also longlisted for the National Book Award and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. Orange graduated from the MFA program at the Institute of American Indian Arts, and was a 2014 MacDowell Fellow and a 2016 Writing by Writers Fellow. He is an enrolled member of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma. He was born and raised in Oakland, California.

About Seattle Reads:

Seattle Reads is a city-wide book group, where people are encouraged to read and discuss the same book. It’s designed to deepen engagement in literature through reading and discussion. Everyone is invited to participate by reading the featured book, joining in a book discussion or attending programs with the featured writer.

View in Catalog: There There by Tommy Orange

Oct
27
Tue
Keith And Chenoa Egawa Discuss “The Whale Child” @ Online (see listing)
Oct 27 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

This brother and sister writing team share the story of Shiny, a whale child that becomes a boy to help humans understand the harm facing the world’s oceans.

Registration required. Please click here to register.

The Whale Child introduces children ages 7 to 12 to existing environmental issues with a message of hope, education, sharing, and action.

This event is supported by The Seattle Public Library Foundation, author series sponsors the Gary and Connie Kunis Foundation, and Seattle City of Literature. Thanks to media sponsor The Seattle Times.

ABOUT THE BOOK:

Shiny is a whale child. One day his mother teaches him about the harm facing the world’s oceans because of human carelessness. Shiny agrees to be turned into a boy by the ocean’s water spirit so he can visit the land and alert people to these dangers. He meets Alex, a young Coast Salish girl who learns from Shiny that the living spirit of water exists in everything–glaciers, rivers, oceans, rain, plants, and all living creatures. Together the two travel the earth, confronting the realities of a planet threatened by an uncertain future. Inspired by Shiny’s hope, humor, and wisdom, Alex makes the promise to become a teacher for future generations. She realizes that the timeless Indigenous value of environmental stewardship is needed now more than ever and that we must all stand up on behalf of Mother Earth.

Written and illustrated by Indigenous authors Keith Egawa and Chenoa Egawa, The Whale Child introduces children ages 7 to 12 to existing environmental issues with a message of hope, education, sharing, and action. Also included are resources for students and teachers to facilitate learning about Pacific Northwest Indigenous cultures and the environment.

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS:

KEITH and CHENOA EGAWA are siblings who co-wrote and illustrated The Whale Child (2020) and Tani’s Search for the Heart (2013). They are both enrolled members of the Lummi Indian Nation.

KEITH EGAWA is a graduate of the University of Washington’s Creative Writing program and author of the novel Madchild Running (Red Crane Books Inc. 1999). Keith’s extensive work experience in the fields of Children and Family Services and Indian Education Reform has provided him with both inspiration and insight into this subject matter. Keith has been awarded several artists grants, including the ARTs Up grant through the Seattle Arts Commission, which was used to conduct a series of writing workshops for Native youth in the Seattle area.

CHENOA EGAWA is the owner of Swan Clan Productions. She is a traditional Native singer, storyteller, ceremonial leader, and medicine carrier. Chenoa has served as a Lummi delegate and an interpreter in Central and South America and for the UN. She has also served as Indian Education liaison in public and tribal schools, promoting racial equity through art and education.

PRAISE:

“Vivid illustrations juxtapose the beauty and scale of the natural world that the children explore. . . . This necessary read decolonizes the Western construction of climate change.”

—Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“For the Coast Salish people, the nonhuman living world is not filled with resources to be abused and extracted—rather, these are our relatives that carry our original instructions. . . . Promoting these concepts and the necessary fusion of Indigenous ecological perspectives with western understandings is the fully realized mantra narrated for us in this marvelous story. The critical insights of our responsibilities and the truth of reciprocity—particularly with water, the first medicine—are woven into each page. Through playful adventure, the essence of ancient instructions emerges in the context of a modern world.”

—Valerie Segrest, Muckleshoot, author, Native food systems strategist and wild medicine expert

“A treasure of a book—educational, inspirational, and beautiful!”

—Keely Parrack, author of Morning, Sunshine!

Accommodations: We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations.

Nov
15
Sun
Jack Straw Writers’ Showcase @ Online (see listing)
Nov 15 @ 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm

Join us to hear new work from members of the Jack Straw Writing Program, curated by Anastacia-Reneé. Registration is required.

Click here to register. The link to access the event will be sent to you by email once you register.

Presenters may include: Anastacia-Reneé, Rob Arnold, Ebo Barton, Jeffrey Lee Cheatham II, Ching-In Chen, Elaina Ellis, Michelle Goodman, Maisha Banks Manson, Wryly T. McCutchen, Troy Osaki, Helen K. Thomas, Jose Trejo-Maya, Arianne True.

The event is presented in partnership with Jack Straw Cultural Center. This event is supported by The Seattle Public Library Foundation, author series sponsors the Gary and Connie Kunis Foundation, and Seattle City of Literature. Thanks to media sponsor The Seattle Times.

ABOUT THE EVENT:

The Jack Straw Writers Program, now in its twenty-fourth year, has included more than 250 Pacific Northwest writers who represent a diverse range of literary genres. The purpose of the Jack Straw Writers Program is to introduce local writers to the medium of recorded audio; to develop their presentation skills for both live and recorded readings; to encourage the creation of new literary work; to present the writers and their work in live readings, in an anthology, on the web, and on the radio; and to build community among writers. Each year an invited curator selects the participating writers from a large pool of applicants, based on artistic excellence, diversity of literary genres and experiences, and creating a cohesive group of writers. Writers receive training in vocal presentation, performance, and microphone technique to prepare them for studio recording and live readings. Their recorded readings and interviews with the curator are then used to produce features on our web site, for radio broadcast, and for podcasts, which are available for streaming or download on the Jack Straw website.

ABOUT THE CURATOR:

2020 Writers Program Curator Anastacia-Renée is a multi-genre writer, educator, and interdisciplinary artist. She is the recipient of the 2018, James W. Ray Distinguished Artist Award for Washington artists (Artist Trust), and has served as the Seattle Civic Poet from 2017-2019, and the 2015-2017 Poet-in-Residence at Hugo House. Anastacia-Renee is a TED Speaker, The Deep End podcast Co-host, two-time Pushcart nominee and writer and director of 9 Ounces, A One Woman Show and Queer, Mama, Crossroads. She is the author of Forget It (Black Radish Books), (v.), (Black Ocean) 26, (Dancing Girl Press), and Answer(Me) (Winged City Chapbooks, Argus Press) and has received writing fellowships and residencies from Cave Canem, Hedgebrook, VONA, Artist Trust, Jack Straw, Ragdale, Whiteley, Mineral School and Hypatia in the Woods. She teaches multi-genre workshops at Hugo House, libraries, universities, and conferences.

We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations.

Nov
17
Tue
Online: The Seattle Public Library Foundation Presents Ron Chew: My Unforgotten Seattle @ Online (see listing)
Nov 17 @ 6:00 pm – 7:10 pm

Join us to celebrate the release of local luminary Ron Chew’s new memoir. Registration is required.

Click here to register.

This event is presented by The Seattle Public Library Foundation.

ABOUT THE BOOK:

Third-generation Seattleite, historian, journalist, and museum visionary Ron Chew spent more than five decades fighting for Asian American and social justice causes in Seattle. In this deeply personal memoir, he documents the tight-knit community he remembers, describing small family shops, chop suey restaurants, and sewing factories now vanished. He untangles the mystery of his extended family’s journey to America during the era of the Chinese Exclusion Act. Intimate profiles of his parents—a waiter and garment worker—and leaders like Bob Santos, Ruth Woo, Al Sugiyama, Roberto Maestas, and Kip Tokuda are set against the familiar backdrop of local landmarks such as Sick’s Stadium, Kokusai Theatre, Shorey’s Bookstore, Higo Variety Store, Hong Kong Restaurant, and Chubby & Tubby. He highlights Seattle’s unsung champions in the fight for racial inclusion, political empowerment, American ethnic studies, Asian American arts, Japanese American redress, and revitalization of the Chinatown-International District. Chew himself led a successful campaign to transform a historic hotel into the Wing Luke Museum’s permanent home.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER:

Ron Chew served as editor of the International Examiner and as executive director of the Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience. His books include Reflections of Seattle’s Chinese Americans: The First 100 Years and Remembering Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes: The Legacy of Filipino American Labor Activism.

View in Catalog: My Unforgotten Seattle by Ron Chew

We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations.

Nov
18
Wed
“Unmuted Stories.” @ Online (see listing)
Nov 18 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

Join us on Wednesday Nov. 18th for a free reading of selections from the engaging new anthology Unmuted: Stories of Courage and Resilience from the GenPRIDE Community. Pre-Registration is required. Click here to register for free.

A reading & live Q&A with local authors of Unmuted: Stories of Courage and Resilience from the GenPRIDE Community, an engaging new anthology of memoirs by fourteen LGBTQI elders and allies.

The authors will read story excerpts, as well discuss the healing and sense of community that came from writing and sharing important life stories in what began as a simple writing workshop at GenPRIDE. During this event, you’ll have a unique opportunity to ask live questions of the authors about their stories and writing process.

In this gripping anthology, fourteen LGBTQIA midlife and older adults share the struggles and triumphs that shaped their lives. Some stories delve into issues that have marked their generation: AIDS, gender identity, sexuality, persecution, and claiming one’s self. Others grapple with health, family, loss, addiction, and love. Unmuted is about heartbreak and courage, strength, and resilience. It is a riveting testimony to the power of personal storytelling.

Join us for a live and lively discussion of LGBTQIA lives and storytelling!

This free reading and Q&A is presented in partnership with GenPRIDE Seattle, Western Washington’s resource for LGBTQIA+ aging. Click here to learn more.

View in Catalog Unmuted: Stories Of Courage And Resilience From The GenPRIDE Community by GenPRIDE

We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations. Captions are available for all recorded Library programs.

Daudi Abe and Jazmyn Scott discuss “Emerald Street.” @ Online (see listing)
Nov 18 @ 7:00 pm – 8:10 pm

Join us to hear Dr. Daudi Abe and Jazmyn Scott discuss the history of hip-hop in Seattle. Registration is required.

Click here to register. The link to access the event will be sent to you by email once you register.

The event is presented in partnership with LANGSTON, Wa Na Wari, and Elliott Bay Book Company. This event is supported by The Seattle Public Library Foundation, author series sponsors the Gary and Connie Kunis Foundation, and Seattle City of Literature. Thanks to media sponsor The Seattle Times.

ABOUT THE BOOK:

From the first rap battles in Seattle’s Central District to the Grammy stage, hip hop has shaped urban life and the music scene of the Pacific Northwest for more than four decades. In the early 1980s, Seattle’s hip-hop artists developed a community-based culture of stylistic experimentation and multiethnic collaboration. Emerging at a distance from the hip-hop centers of New York City and Los Angeles, Seattle’s most famous hip-hop figures, Sir Mix-A-Lot and Macklemore, found mainstream success twenty years apart by going directly against the grain of their respective eras. In addition, Seattle has produced a two-time world-champion breaking crew, globally renowned urban clothing designers, an international hip-hop magazine, and influential record producers.

In Emerald Street, Daudi Abe chronicles the development of Seattle hip hop from its earliest days, drawing on interviews with artists and journalists to trace how the elements of hip hop–rapping, DJing, breaking, and graffiti–flourished in the Seattle scene. He shows how Seattle hip-hop culture goes beyond art and music, influencing politics, the relationships between communities of color and law enforcement, the changing media scene, and youth outreach and educational programs. The result is a rich narrative of a dynamic and influential force in Seattle music history and beyond.

Emerald Street was made possible in part by a grant from 4Culture’s Heritage Program.

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS:

Dr. Daudi Abe is professor of humanities at Seattle Central College and author of 6 ‘N the Morning: West Coast Hip-Hop Music 1987-1992 and The Transformation of Mainstream Culture.

Jazmyn Scott is the current and first Program Manager of L ANGSTON; Seattle’s hub for Black arts and culture. In 2009 Jazmyn founded The Town Entertainment, a company that presented, produced & promoted live music and unique events in Seattle, as well as the marketing & development of up and coming artists; primarily in the R&B/Soul and Hip-Hop genres.

In 2012, Jazmyn co-founded 50 Next: Seattle Hip-Hop Worldwide, a digital “time capsule” highlighting Seattle and Northwest Hip-Hop, and later partnered with the Black Heritage

Society of WA to plan the Black History Month Celebration at the Museum of History & Industry in 2014. The success of that event led to the opportunity to curate a community exhibit on Seattle Hip-Hop. The Legacy of Seattle Hip-Hop exhibit had a highly successful 8-month run at MOHAI and won the 2016 American Association for State & Local History (AASLH) Leadership in History award. Recently, Jazmyn curated and co-produced 2(06) The Break, a seven episode series that took a uniquely local spin on the recently popularized DJ live streaming sessions.

View in Catalog Emerald Street: A History of Hip-Hop in Seattle by Dr. Daudi Abe

We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations.

Nov
22
Sun
Setsuko’s Secret: Exploring The Multigenerational Effects Of The Japanese American Incarceration @ Online (see listing)
Nov 22 @ 4:00 pm – 5:15 pm

Don’t miss an engaging book panel discussion on Setsuko’s Secret: Heart Mountain and the Legacy of the Japanese American Incarceration. Registration is required. Click here to register.

Author Shirley Ann Higuchi, J.D., chair of the Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation, uncovers her family’s past and embarks on a transformational journey as she learns about the Japanese American incarceration during World War II and what happened to her family and those of other former incarcerees. She will be joined by Darrell Kunitomi and Aura Newlin, who are also descendants of former incarcerees featured in the book. They will discuss the book, the multigenerational effects of trauma and the incarceration’s relevance to contemporary issues of racism and identity in America. Tom Ikeda, Founding Executive Director of Densho based in Seattle, Washington will moderate the discussion.

This event is presented in partnership with Densho and the Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation. Seattle Chapter of the Japanese American Citizens League and Puyallup Valley Chapter of the Japanese American Citizens League are sponsors of the program. This event is supported by The Seattle Public Library Foundation, author series sponsors the Gary and Connie Kunis Foundation, and Seattle City of Literature. Thanks to media sponsor The Seattle Times. Elliott Bay Book Company is selling copies with an author signed book plate.

ABOUT THE BOOK:

As children, Shirley Ann Higuchi and her brothers knew Heart Mountain only as the place their parents met, imagining it as a great Stardust Ballroom in rural Wyoming. As they grew older, they would come to recognize the name as a source of great sadness and shame for their older family members, part of the generation of Japanese Americans forced into the hastily built concentration camp in the aftermath of Executive Order 9066.

Only after a serious cancer diagnosis did Shirley’s mother, Setsuko, share her vision for a museum at the site of the former camp, where she had been donating funds and volunteering in secret for many years. After Setsuko’s death, Shirley skeptically accepted an invitation to visit the site, a journey that would forever change her life and introduce her to a part of her mother she never knew.

Navigating the complicated terrain of the Japanese American experience, Shirley patched together Setsuko’s story and came to understand the forces and generational trauma that shaped her own life. Moving seamlessly between family and communal history, Setsuko’s Secret offers a clear window into the “camp life” that was rarely revealed to the children of the incarcerated. This volume powerfully insists that we reckon with the pain in our collective American past.

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS:

Author, Shirley Ann Higuchi, JD, Chair of the Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation (HMWF), is the daughter of former incarcerees Dr. William I. Higuchi and the late Setsuko Saito Higuchi. Her U.S.-born parents were children when they were incarcerated at Heart Mountain during World War II. Shirley’s pursuit of law stemmed from her feelings of discomfort toward how the U.S. judicial system treated her parents. It was not until her mother was on her deathbed in 2005 that Shirley learned of her mother’s dream of “having something built” at Heart Mountain. She was elected Chair of the Board in 2009 and her proudest moment was unveiling the Foundation’s world-class Interpretive Center in August 2011 with journalist Tom Brokaw, the late Senator Daniel K. Inouye, Secretary Norman Mineta and Senator Alan K. Simpson.

In addition to her work with Heart Mountain, Shirley currently leads the legal advocacy office of the American Psychological Association. Active in the District of Columbia Bar, Shirley served two elected terms on the Board of Governors from 1994 to 2000, served as Chair of the Bar’s Nominations Committee in 2001, and was elected President of the Bar for 2003. In 2008, Shirley was appointed to the Judicial Tenure and Disabilities Commission for a six-year term where she was responsible for reviewing misconduct, evaluating reappointments, and conducting fitness reviews of the District’s judges. In 2014, Shirley was appointed to the Federal Law Enforcement Nominating Commission by Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC). Follow her on Twitter @HiguchiJD.

Aura (Sunada-Matsumura) Newlin is an assistant professor of Anthropology and Sociology at Northwest College in Powell, Wyoming. A fourth-generation Wyomingite and fourth-generation Japanese American, her heritage involves intertwined stories of imprisonment at Heart Mountain, Tule Lake, and Manzanar; racially segregated military service; and hardships suffered by Wyoming railroaders who were fired because of their Japanese ancestry. Prof. Newlin is secretary of the Board of Directors for the Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation, a board member for the National Consortium on Racial and Ethnic Fairness in the Courts, and a national steering committee member for Tsuru for Solidarity. She actively educates about the contemporary relevance of Japanese American incarceration, and has delivered presentations to legal and lay audiences around the country. She earned a BA in ethnomusicology from the University of Wyoming and an MA in medical anthropology from Case Western Reserve University, where she specialized in global health and infectious disease control. Now focusing on the anthropology of law, she is a PhD candidate at Case Western Reserve University. As a teacher, she is dedicated to instilling in her students a heightened capacity for compassion and empathy toward those who are different from them.

Darrell Kunitomi has worked for the Los Angeles Times for 40 years in the communications department, giving speaking engagements on behalf of the newspaper and giving tours around the newspaper’s offices to individuals and groups. Over that time, he has become the company’s historian. He has also written articles on the outdoors for the Times. Darrell is a member of the Grateful Crane Theater Ensemble, an organization that creates performances around Japanese and Japanese American stories. He is a member of two of the most notable families of the incarceration. His father Jack was the sports editor of the Heart Mountain Sentinel and a member of the Military Intelligence Service. His aunt Sue Kunitomi Embrey was a leader of the Manzanar pilgrimages and the Manzanar Committee. His uncle Ted Fujioka was the first student body president of Heart Mountain High School; Ted died in France while serving as a member of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team. Darrell’s older brother Dale was born in the Heart Mountain hospital.

Tom Ikeda, the founding Executive Director of Densho, is a sansei (third generation Japanese American) who was born and raised in Seattle. Tom’s parents and grandparents were incarcerated during World War II at Minidoka, Idaho. Prior to working at Densho, Tom was a General Manager at Microsoft Corporation in the Multimedia Publishing Group, and previously worked as a research engineer and as a financial analyst. He has received numerous awards for his historical contributions, including the Humanities Washington Award for outstanding achievement in the public humanities, the National JACL Japanese American of the Biennium award for Education, and the Microsoft Alumni Fellows Award.

We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations.

Dec
5
Sat
Washington’s Undiscovered Feminists With Mayumi Tsutakawa @ Online (see listing)
Dec 5 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage, join us in remembering some of the remarkable, but often unsung, women of the Pacific Northwest. Registration is required. Please click here to register.

Writer Mayumi Tsutakawa presents five “woman warriors” in the arts and journalism from the past century whose stories inspire. Meet the pioneering photographer Imogen Cunningham, Black American jazz musician Ruby Bishop, Chinese American artist Priscilla Chong Jue, Leftist journalist Anna Louise Strong, and Native American linguist Vi Hilbert. Drawing on her own experience as an activist and writer, she explores how these women inspired others and changed our state and our society.

About the speaker:

Mayumi Tsutakawa is an independent writer and curator who has focused on Asian/Pacific American history and arts. Tsutakawa received her MA in Communications and her BA in East Asian Studies at the University of Washington. She co-edited The Forbidden Stitch: Asian American Women’s Literary Anthology which received the Before Columbus Foundation’s American Book Award. Tsutakawa lives in Seattle.

This event is sponsored by Humanities Washington.

We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations.

For registration information and other questions, Ask Us or 206-386-4636.

Dec
9
Wed
Online: ‘Story Time with Miss Nancy’ @ Online (see listing)
Dec 9 @ 10:00 am – 10:20 am

Seattle Public Library is releasing weekly story times and learning from home tips on their Kid’s YouTube channel: Wednesday December 9 @ 10am “Story Time with Miss Nancy” Virtual YouTube Premiere. Sing songs and read books about snow.

Catch the premier on our Kids’ YouTube Channel

Dec
11
Fri
J Mase Author Reading: Black Trans Prayer Book @ Online (see listing)
Dec 11 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

Don’t miss an incredible evening with J Mase III and co-editors of the Black Trans Prayer Book. Join the contributors of the Black Trans Prayer Book for an evening of spirited connections.

We will add the streaming link here and on our Facebook event page one week before the event

The Black Trans Prayer Book: is a beyond-faith-and-interfaith, multi-dimensional, artistic and theological work that collects the stories, poems, prayers, meditation, spells, and incantations of Black Trans & Non-Binary people. Often pushed out of Faith spaces and yet still deeply connected to a historical legacy of spiritual essentiality, Black Trans People face unprecedented amounts of spiritual, physical, and psychological violence. The Black Trans Prayer Book is a tool of healing, and affirmation centered on uplifting Black Trans & Non-Binary people and celebrating our place within faith.

What does it mean to have a faith practice that simultaneously challenges white supremacy and transphobia? Where is there a theological framework that centers the most marginalized and creates pathways towards an active spirituality moving alongside social justice? How might a spiritual practice not in tune with these questions cause harm? The #BlackTransPrayerBook, is holding these very questions.

Grab the book on the website!

We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations.

Dec
16
Wed
Online: ‘Story Time with Leslie’ @ Online (see listing)
Dec 16 @ 10:00 am – 10:30 am

Seattle Public Library is releasing weekly story times and learning from home tips on their Kid’s YouTube channel: Wednesday December 16 @ 10am “Story Time with Leslie” Virtual YouTube Premiere. Sing songs and read books about cats.

Catch the premier on our Kids’ YouTube Channel

Dec
23
Wed
Online: ‘Story Time with Christiane’ @ Online (see listing)
Dec 23 @ 10:00 am – 10:30 am

Seattle Public Library is releasing weekly story times and learning from home tips on their Kid’s YouTube channel: Wednesday December 23 @ 10am “Story Time with Christiane” Virtual YouTube Premiere. Sing songs and read books with a librarian.

Catch the premier on our Kids’ YouTube Channel

Jan
14
Thu
Words, Writers and Southwest Stories: Herbert Munter: Aviator of the Pacific Northwest @ Online (see listing)
Jan 14 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

‘Words, Writers & SouthWest Stories,’ a historically-based speaker series of the Southwest Seattle Historical Society, is delighted to host local historian Fred Poyner IV for a live Zoom presentation on Thursday, January 14 at 6:00 PM. Poyner will deliver a presentation entitled, “Herbert Munter – Aviator of the Pacific Northwest.” Registration is required. Please register HERE.

One of Seattle’s earliest aviators, Munter began his aviation exploits with the construction of his first home-built “flying machine,” which he successfully flew from the tidal flats of the Duwamish Peninsula in 1912. Over the next two decades, Munter went on to become a hero of the skies, setting several altitude records and serving as the first test pilot for the new Boeing Company in 1916. We hope you will join us to learn more about the life of this local aviator.

Poyner will also offer a short preview of his new forthcoming book Portland Public Sculptors: Monuments, Memorials and Statuary, 1900-2003, which is part of the “America Through Time” series.

Fred Poyner IV is a historian and author with over 27 years of experience in researching and writing about the art and history of the Pacific Northwest. His first book, The First Sculptor of Seattle: The Life and Art of James A. Wehn, was funded through the 4Culture’s Heritage Projects grant award in 2014, and has received both the Association of King County Historical Organization’s (AKCHO) Virginia Marie Folkins Award for Outstanding Historical Publication and the Washington Museum Association’s Award of Excellence in 2015. Poyner is a regular contributor to the Filson Company, as well as historical articles and essays for other organizations and publications, including: HistoryLink.org, the Washington State Historical Society, National Nordic Museum, Museum of the Mountain Man, and Society of American Archivists. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art History from Western Washington University, and a Master of Arts degree in Museology and Art from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Poyner currently lives in Issaquah, Washington, with his family.

This series is open to hosting any author or speaker addressing historical issues relating to the Puget Sound/Duwamish Peninsula and/or the general public. Additional information on future presentations can be obtained by contacting Dora-Faye Hendricks, Chair, ‘Words, Writers & SouthWest Stories’ by phone at 206-290-8315 or by e-mail at Dora-Faye@comcast.net.

‘Words, Writers & Southwest Stories,’ a historically-based speaker series of the Southwest Seattle Historical Society, is offered in partnership with The Southwest Seattle Historical Society and The Seattle Public Library.

Jan
28
Thu
WA State Book Awards: Eric Liu And “Become America: Civic Sermons On Love, Responsibility, And Democracy” @ Online (see listing)
Jan 28 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

The Washington Center for the Book and the Washington Library Association present an evening with Eric Liu. Registration required. Click here to register.

Winner of the 2020 Washington State Book Award for Creative Nonfiction, Become America offers stirring explorations of current and timeless topics about democracy, liberty, equal justice, and powerful citizenship.

What does it mean to be an engaged American in today’s divided political landscape, and how do we restore hope in our country? Become America: Civic Sermons on Love, Responsibility, and Democracy (Sasquatch Publishing) is a collection of “civic sermons” delivered at gatherings around the nation, popular advocate for active citizenship Eric Liu takes on these thorny questions and provides inspiration and solace in a time of anger, fear, and dismay over the state of the Union.

Liu will do a brief reading followed by a discussion on civic involvement and a Q&A.

Eric Liu is a fellow at the New America Foundation. He writes the “Teachings” column for Slate and is the author of The Accidental Asian: Notes of a Native Speaker, a New York Times Notable Book featured in the PBS documentary Matters of Race. Liu served as a speechwriter for President Clinton and later as White House deputy domestic policy adviser. He teaches at the University of Washington’s Evans School of Public Affairs.

This event is presented by the Washington Center for the Book (a partnership of The Seattle Public Library and the Washington State Library) and the Washington Library Association. The event is free and will be presented on Zoom. Registration is required to receive the event link. The event will be recorded and can be accessed on SPL’s YouTube channel.
View in Catalog Become America by Eric Liu

We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations. Captions are available for all recorded Library programs.

Feb
11
Thu
Words, Writers and Southwest Stories: Brad Holden: Seattle Prohibition: Bootleggers, Rumrunners and Graft in the Queen City @ Online (see listing)
Feb 11 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

‘Words, Writers & SouthWest Stories,’ a historically-based speaker series of the Southwest Seattle Historical Society, is delighted to host local historian Brad Holden for a live Zoom presentation on Thursday, February 11 at 6:00 PM. Holden will deliver a presentation about his book, “Seattle Prohibition: Bootleggers, Rumrunners and Graft in the Queen City.” Registration is required. Please register HERE.

Prohibition consumed Seattle, igniting a war that lasted nearly twenty years and played out in the streets, waterways and even town hall. Roy Olmstead, formerly a Seattle police officer, became the King of the Seattle Bootleggers, and Johnny Schnarr, running liquor down from Canada, revolutionized the speedboat industry. Frank Gatt, a south Seattle restaurateur, started the state’s biggest moonshining operation. Skirting around the law, the Coast Guard and the zealous assistant director of the Seattle Prohibition Bureau, William Whitney, was no simple feat, but many rose to the challenge. Join us to hear Brad Holden tell the spectacular story of Seattle in the time of Prohibition.

Brad Holden is a local author, historian and “finder of old things.” When not out searching for local historical artifacts, he enjoys writing about Seattle’s past. His work has appeared in Pacific Northwest Magazine, and he is a contributing writer for HistoryLink.org. Brad is also the author of “Seattle Prohibition: Bootleggers, Rumrunners & Graft in the Queen City,” and his next book—a biography about mysterious Seattle inventor and psychedelic pioneer, Al Hubbard—is due to be published later this year.

This series is open to hosting any author or speaker addressing historical issues relating to the Puget Sound/Duwamish Peninsula and/or the general public. Additional information on future presentations can be obtained by contacting Dora-Faye Hendricks, Chair, ‘Words, Writers & SouthWest Stories’ by phone at 206-290-8315 or by e-mail at Dora-Faye@comcast.net.

‘Words, Writers & Southwest Stories,’ a historically-based speaker series of the Southwest Seattle Historical Society, is offered in partnership with The Southwest Seattle Historical Society and The Seattle Public Library.

Mar
11
Thu
Words, Writers and Southwest Stories: T. Andrew Wahl: “Comic Book Reality: Superheroes and the Power of Representation” @ Online (see listing)
Mar 11 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

‘Words, Writers & SouthWest Stories,’ a historically-based speaker series of the Southwest Seattle Historical Society, is excited to announce that it is hosting T. Andrew Wahl for a live Zoom presentation on Thursday, March 11 at 6:00 PM. Wahl will deliver a presentation entitled, “Comic Book Reality: Superheroes and the Power of Representation.” Registration is required. Please register HERE.

Since their debut in the 1930s, comic books have been a regular part of our pop-culture landscape. While often dismissed as escapist entertainment, these pulp treasures also provide a fascinating lens through which to view our nation’s past, present and potential future.

In this interactive presentation, journalist and educator T. Andrew Wahl explores how everything from social movements to business concerns to changing demographics have shaped the reality seen in the pages of comics. Drawing from comics including Black Panther, Wonder Woman, Captain America, and others, Wahl shows how four-color heroes aren’t merely confined to paper—they shape the world we live in.

T. Andrew Wahl is a journalist who has worked as an editor and editorial cartoonist. Wahl is a lifelong comic book aficionado, focusing on the Bronze Age (1975-85) of the American comic book. Wahl studied comic-books as a part of his MA in the humanities at Fort Hays State University. He currently teaches journalism at Everett Community College.

This presentation is part of the Humanities Washington Speakers Bureau. The Southwest Seattle Historical Society is grateful for the support of Humanities Washington and to our partners at the Seattle Public Library.

This series is open to hosting any author or speaker addressing historical issues relating to the Puget Sound/Duwamish Peninsula and/or the general public. Additional information on future presentations can be obtained by contacting Dora-Faye Hendricks, Chair, ‘Words, Writers & SouthWest Stories’ by phone at 206-290-8315 or by e-mail at Dora-Faye@comcast.net.

‘Words, Writers & Southwest Stories,’ a historically-based speaker series of the Southwest Seattle Historical Society, is offered in partnership with The Southwest Seattle Historical Society and The Seattle Public Library.

Mar
21
Sun
Jourdan Imani Keith Presents “Womxn & Whales First, Poetry In A Climate Of Change” @ Online (see listing)
Mar 21 @ 4:00 pm – 5:10 pm

Join Seattle Civic Poet Jourdan Imani Keith and six other poets who will read work that shows how protecting endangered womxn will protect endangered whales. Registration required. Click here to register.

Celebrate World Poetry Day with seven Black, Indigenous, Womxn of Color reading original poetry that explores the intersectionality of womxn’s health, healing, and the endangered Orca whales of the Salish Sea. Seattle Civic Poet Jourdan Imani Keith says, “As Black Indigenous Womxn of Color in Seattle, we share the urban wilderness of the Salish Sea with the endangered Killer Whales. Our bodies face the same cumulative risks of environmental toxins and the harms of objectification, yet we both survive and are revived by the cumulative benefits of matrilineal wisdom, tradition and community. Our brilliance and wellness is entwined with the need for healthy and protected social and natural ecosystems.”

Join Keith, along with 6 other local poets, who will perform original pantoums developed through workshops facilitated by Keith over the last few months as part of her larger project, Womxn & Whales First, Poetry in a Climate of Change. After the reading, Keith and the other poets will hold a conversation with the digital audience.

The event is presented in partnership with The Seattle Public Library Foundation, the Office of Arts & Culture, and Seattle City of Literature. This event is supported by the Gary and Connie Kunis Foundation. Thanks to media sponsor The Seattle Times.

We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations. Captions are available for all recorded Library programs.

Apr
8
Thu
Words, Writers and Southwest Stories: Ron Marshall: “Hunger Immortal: The First Thirty Years of the West Seattle Food Bank” @ Online (see listing)
Apr 8 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

‘Words, Writers & SouthWest Stories,’ a historically-based speaker series of the Southwest Seattle Historical Society, is excited to announce that it is hosting Ron Marshall for a live Zoom presentation on Thursday, April 8 at 6:00 PM. Marshall will deliver a presentation entitled, “Hunger Immortal: The First Thirty Years of the West Seattle Food Bank.” Registration is required. Please register HERE.

The history of the West Seattle Food Bank is no ordinary story. It’s filled with intrigue and sadness, great dedication and mounds of lucky breaks. Ron will explore the story of the bank from its beginnings in 1983 and its ongoing efforts to meet the needs of a changing, growing community. Ron will also provide a glimpse into both the history of the food bank and profiles of the individuals, including board members, volunteers, donors, and property owners, who worked to guarantee that the food bank had a permanent home.

Ron Marshall has served on the West Seattle Food Bank board since 1996. He’s past president of the West Seattle Ministerial Association and has served on the board of Music Northwest for over twenty-five years.

Ron has been the pastor of First Lutheran Church of West Seattle since 1979. He was raised in Tacoma and graduated from Stadium High School in 1967, and graduated from Washington State University in 1971. Ron is the author of two books on the religious thought of Martin Luther and Søren Kierkegaard. He’s also well known for his unique, on-going class on the Koran, which he has been teaching four times a year since 2003.

This series is open to hosting any author or speaker addressing historical issues relating to the Puget Sound/Duwamish Peninsula and/or the general public. Additional information on future presentations can be obtained by contacting Dora-Faye Hendricks, Chair, ‘Words, Writers & SouthWest Stories’ by phone at 206-290-8315 or by e-mail at Dora-Faye@comcast.net.

‘Words, Writers & Southwest Stories,’ a historically-based speaker series of the Southwest Seattle Historical Society, is offered in partnership with The Southwest Seattle Historical Society and The Seattle Public Library.

Apr
9
Fri
Quiara Alegría Hudes Discusses “My Broken Language” @ Online (see listing)
Apr 9 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Join us to hear Hudes, a Pulitzer Prize–winning playwright, talk about coming of age, with her sprawling Puerto Rican family as a collective muse. Registration required. Click here to register via EventBrite.

Quiara Alegría Hudes is in her own league. Her sentences will take your breath away. How lucky we are to have her telling our stories.” —Lin-Manuel Miranda, award-winning creator of Hamilton

This event is presented in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company, The Seattle Repertory Theatre, Intiman Theatre, and The Seattle Public Library Foundation. Thank you to author series sponsors the Gary and Connie Kunis Foundation, and to media sponsor The Seattle Times. This event will be recorded and posted afterwards on SPL’s YouTube channel.

ABOUT THE BOOK:

Quiara Alegría Hudes was the sharp-eyed girl on the stairs while her family danced in her grandmother’s tight North Philly kitchen. She was awed by her aunts and uncles and cousins, but haunted by the secrets of the family and the unspoken, untold stories of the barrio—even as she tried to find her own voice in the sea of language around her, written and spoken, English and Spanish, bodies and books, Western art and sacred altars. Her family became her private pantheon, a gathering circle of powerful orisha-like women with tragic real-world wounds, and she vowed to tell their stories—but first she’d have to get off the stairs and join the dance. She’d have to find her language.

Weaving together Hudes’s love of books with the stories of her family, the lessons of North Philly with those of Yale, this is an inspired exploration of home, memory, and belonging—narrated by an obsessed girl who fought to become an artist so she could capture the world she loved in all its wild and delicate beauty.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER:

Quiara Alegría Hudes is a writer, wife, mother of two, barrio feminist, and native of West Philly, USA. Hailed for their exuberance, intellectual rigor, and rich imagination, her plays and musicals have been performed around the world. They include the Broadway hit In the Heights and the Pulitzer Prize–winning drama Water by the Spoonful. She also founded Emancipated Stories, an online gallery where people behind bars can share one page of their life story with the world.

PRAISE:

“Every line of this book is poetry. From North Philly to all of us, Hudes showers us with aché, teaching us what it looks like to find languages of survival in a country with a ‘panoply of invisibilities.’ Hudes paints unforgettable moments on every page for mothers and daughters and all spiritually curious and existential human beings. This story is about Latinas. But it is also about all of us.”—Maria Hinojosa, Emmy Award–winning journalist and author of Once I Was You: A Memoir of Love and Hate in a Torn America

“Wise, graceful, and devastatingly beautiful, Hudes’s memoir gives voice to the complicated cultural collisions and gentle rebellions that seed a life. I was inspired and moved by the resilient spirit of Hudes and the Perez women, who through joy and great heartbreak manage to conjure a remarkable world in and beyond their Philly barrio.”—Lynn Nottage, two-time Pulitzer Prize–winning playwrightent to request accommodations. Captions are available for all recorded Library programs.

View in Catalog: My Broken Language by Quiara Alegría Hudes

ADA Accommodations: We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations. Captions are available for all recorded Library programs.

Apr
11
Sun
Virtual Writers Read @ Online (see listing)
Apr 11 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Join us for a monthly reading series featuring an open mic and selected author readings from local writers. Registration is required. Click here to register on our partner’s website.

Local writers will read from their diverse repertoires of poetry, short stories, novels and essays. The event will end with a Q&A session, followed by an open mic session.

This program is presented in partnership with African-American Writers’ Alliance on the second Sunday of the month.

Ability to use Zoom on your own computer or phone is required for this program.
Registration is Required.

We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations. Captions are available for all recorded Library programs.

Apr
22
Thu
Rónán Hession And Nancy Pearl Discuss “Leonard And Hungry Paul” @ Online (see listing)
Apr 22 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Join us for a special conversation between beloved rock star librarian Nancy Pearl and Rónán Hession, whose novel Leonard and Hungry Paul is the 2021 One Dublin One Book selection. Registration required. Click here to register.
Did you know that The Seattle Public Library started the original “one book, one city” program when we launched “If All of Seattle Read the Same Book” (better known now as “Seattle Reads”) back in 1998? The program has been a huge success, spreading throughout the United States as well as to cities around the world.

For the first time ever, we’re partnering with another city to celebrate their “one book” selection and to talk a bit about why shared reading experiences are so powerful.

This event is presented in partnership with Dublin City Libraries, Dublin UNESCO City of Literature, Elliott Bay Book Company, Seattle City of Literature and The Seattle Public Library Foundation. Thank you to author series sponsors the Gary and Connie Kunis Foundation, and to media sponsor The Seattle Times. This event will be pre-recorded and streamed on SPL’s YouTube channel.

ABOUT THE BOOK:

A disarming novel that asks a simple question: Can gentle people change the world?

In this charming and truly unique debut, popular Irish musician Rónán Hession tells the story of two single, thirty-something men who still live with their parents and who are . . . nice. They take care of their parents and play board games together. They like to read. They take satisfaction from their work. They are resolutely kind. And they realize that none of this is considered . . . normal.

Leonard and Hungry Paul is the story of two friends struggling to protect their understanding of what’s meaningful in life. It is about the uncelebrated people of this world — the gentle, the meek, the humble. And as they struggle to persevere, the book asks a surprisingly enthralling question: Is it really them against the world, or are they on to something?

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS:

Rónán Hession is an Irish writer, musician, and social worker based in Dublin. As Mumblin’ Deaf Ro, he has released three albums of songs, and his most recent album, Dictionary Crimes, was nominated for the Choice Music Prize for album of the year. Leonard and Hungry Paul is his first novel, and was shortlisted for an Irish Book of the Year award.

Bestselling author, librarian, literary critic, and devoted reader Nancy Pearl regularly speaks about the importance and pleasure of reading at libraries, literacy organizations, and community groups around the world. She can be heard on NPR’s Morning Edition and KWGS-FM in Tulsa, Oklahoma, discussing her favorite books. Her monthly television show on the Seattle Channel, Book Lust with Nancy Pearl, features interviews with authors, poets, and other literary figures. Among her many honors are the 2011 Librarian of the Year Award from Library Journal and the 2011 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association. Nancy is the creator of the internationally recognized program If All of Seattle Read the Same Book, and was the inspiration for the Archee McPhee “Librarian Action Figure.”

View in Catalog: Leonard and Hungry Paul by Rónán Hession

ADA Accommodations: We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations. Captions are available for all recorded Library programs.

Apr
28
Wed
Virtual Children’s Story Time @ Online (see listing)
Apr 28 @ 10:00 am – 10:20 am

It is story time! Gather your preschoolers and toddlers to enjoy stories, rhymes, songs and fun with one of our children’s librarians.

Catch the premier on our Kids’ YouTube Channel

We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations. Captions are available for all recorded story time programs.

Nguyen Phan Quế Mai With Karl Marlantes Discuss “The Mountains Sing” @ Online (see listing)
Apr 28 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Celebrated Vietnamese poet Nguyễn Phan Quế Mai shares her first novel in English, an enveloping, multigenerational tale of the Trần family, set against the backdrop of the Việt Nam War. Registration required. Click here to register.

Nguyễn Phan Quế Mai will speak with Karl Marlantes, author of Deep River, Matterhorn, and What It’s Like to Go to War.

This event is supported by The Seattle Public Library Foundation, author series sponsors the Gary and Connie Kunis Foundation, and Seattle City of Literature. Thanks to media sponsor The Seattle Times. The event is presented in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company. This program will recorded, captioned and posted on The Seattle Public Library’s YouTube page after the event.

ABOUT THE BOOK:

Trần Diệu Lan, who was born in 1920, was forced to flee her family farm with her six children during the Land Reform as the Communist government rose in the North. Years later in Hà Nội, her young granddaughter, Hương, comes of age as her parents and uncles head off down the Hồ Chí Minh Trail to fight in a conflict that tore not just her beloved country, but her family apart.

Vivid, gripping, and steeped in the language and traditions of Việt Nam, The Mountains Sing brings to life the human costs of this conflict from the point of view of the Vietnamese people themselves, while showing us the true power of kindness and hope.

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS:

Born into the Viet Nam War in 1973, Nguyen Phan Que Mai grew up witnessing the war’s devastation and its aftermath. She worked as a street seller and rice farmer before winning a scholarship to attend university in Australia. She is the author of eight books of poetry, fiction and non-fiction published in Vietnamese, and her writing has been translated and published in more than 10 countries, most recently in Norton’s Inheriting the War anthology. She has been honored with many awards, including the Poetry of the Year 2010 Award from the Ha Noi Writers Association, as well as many grants and fellowships. Married to a European diplomat, Que Mai is currently living in Jakarta with her two teenage children. For more information about Nguyen Phan Que Mai, visit her website.

Karl Marlantes graduated from Yale University and was a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University. He is the bestselling author of Matterhorn, which won the 2011 Washington State Book Award for Fiction as well as The Colby Award. He is also the author of What It Is Like to Go to War and his newest novel, Deep River. He lives in rural Washington.

PRAISE:

“Expansive in scope and feeling, The Mountains Sing is a feat of hope, an unflinchingly felt inquiry into the past, with the courageous storytelling of the present.” —Ocean Vuong, author of On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous

“The Mountains Sing is an epic account of Việt Nam’s painful 20th century history, both vast in scope and intimate in its telling. Through the travails of one family, Nguyễn Phan Quế Mai brings us close to the horrors of famine, war, and class struggle. But in this moving and riveting novel, she also shows us a postwar Việt Nam, a country of hope and renewal, home to a people who have never given up.” —Viet Thanh Nguyen, Pulitzer-Prize winning author of The Sympathizer

“Good literature frees us from being trapped in our own skins by allowing us to identify with characters and see the world through their eyes. Reading this novel, I was moved by Nguyễn Phan Quế Mai’s beautiful, even poetic, depictions of enduring courage. I came away with a deeper understanding of the war in which I fought.” —Karl Marlantes, bestselling author of Matterhorn, What It’s Like to Go to War,and Deep River

View in Catalog: The Mountains Sing by Nguyễn Phan Quế Mai

ADA Accommodations: We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations. Captions are available for all recorded Library programs.

May
3
Mon
David B. Williams And Mary Ann Gwinn Discuss “Homewaters” @ Online (see listing)
May 3 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Join us for a conversation about the human and natural histories in, on, and around Puget Sound. Click here to register via EventBrite.

David B. Williams will discuss his new book Homewaters: A Human and Natural History of Puget Sound with Mary Ann Gwinn.

The event is presented in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company and University of Washington Press. This event is supported by The Seattle Public Library Foundation. Thanks to media sponsor The Seattle Times.

ABOUT THE BOOK:

Not far from Seattle skyscrapers live 150-year-old clams, more than 250 species of fish, and underwater kelp forests as complex as any terrestrial ecosystem. For millennia, vibrant Coast Salish communities have lived beside these waters dense with nutrient-rich foods, with cultures intertwined through exchanges across the waterways. Transformed by settlement and resource extraction, Puget Sound and its future health now depend on a better understanding of the region’s ecological complexities.

Focusing on the area south of Port Townsend and between the Cascade and Olympic mountains, Williams uncovers human and natural histories in, on, and around the Sound. In conversations with archaeologists, biologists, and tribal authorities, Williams traces how generations of humans have interacted with such species as geoducks, salmon, orcas, rockfish, and herring. He sheds light on how warfare shaped development and how people have moved across this maritime highway, in canoes, the mosquito fleet, and today’s ferry system. The book also takes an unflinching look at how the Sound’s ecosystems have suffered from human behavior, including pollution, habitat destruction, and the effects of climate change.

Witty, graceful, and deeply informed, Homewaters weaves history and science into a fascinating and hopeful narrative, one that will introduce newcomers to the astonishing life that inhabits the Sound and offers longtime residents new insight into and appreciation of the waters they call home.

A Michael J. Repass Book

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS:

David B. Williams is a naturalist, author, and educator. His many books include the award-winning Too High and Too Steep: Reshaping Seattle’s Topography and Seattle Walks: Discovering History and Nature in the City. His newest book Homewaters: A Human and Natural History of Puget Sound is available now.

Mary Ann Gwinn writes about books and authors for The Seattle Times, Kirkus Reviews, the Los Angeles Times and other publications. A Pulitzer-Prize winning journalist, she was the book editor of the Seattle Times from 1998 to 2017 and a judge for the 2017 Pulitzer fiction award. She’s a member of the National Book Critics Circle.

View in Catalog: Homewaters by David B. Williams

We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations. Captions are available for all recorded Library programs.

For registration information and other questions, Ask Us or 206-386-4636.

May
5
Wed
Virtual Children’s Story Time @ Online (see listing)
May 5 @ 10:00 am – 10:20 am

It is story time! Gather your preschoolers and toddlers to enjoy stories, rhymes, songs and fun with one of our children’s librarians.

Catch the premier on our Kids’ YouTube Channel

We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations. Captions are available for all recorded story time programs.

May
9
Sun
Virtual Writers Read @ Online (see listing)
May 9 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Join us for a monthly reading series featuring an open mic and selected author readings from local writers. Registration is required. Click here to register on our partner’s website.

Local writers will read from their diverse repertoires of poetry, short stories, novels and essays. The event will end with a Q&A session, followed by an open mic session.

This program is presented in partnership with African-American Writers’ Alliance on the second Sunday of the month.

Ability to use Zoom on your own computer or phone is required for this program.
Registration is Required.

We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations. Captions are available for all recorded Library programs.

May
12
Wed
Virtual Children’s Story Time @ Online (see listing)
May 12 @ 10:00 am – 10:20 am

It is story time! Gather your preschoolers and toddlers to enjoy stories, rhymes, songs and fun with one of our children’s librarians.

Catch the premier on our Kids’ YouTube Channel

We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations. Captions are available for all recorded story time programs.

Jewell Parker Rhodes Discusses “Magic City” @ Online (see listing)
May 12 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Join us for a conversation reflecting on the 100th anniversary of one of the most heinous tragedies in American history—the 1921 burning of Greenwood, an affluent black section of Tulsa, Oklahoma. Registration required. Click here to register via EventBrite.

The event is presented in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company and Northwest African American Museum. This event is supported by The Seattle Public Library Foundation. Thanks to media sponsor The Seattle Times.

ABOUT THE BOOK:

“A compelling page-turner that will keep readers hoping against hope that everything will somehow, magically, turn out for the best.” — Atlanta Journal-Constitution

With a new afterword from the author, Jewell Parker Rhodes’ powerful Magic City is an unforgettable novel of racism, vigilantism, and injustice, that weaves history, mysticism, and murder into a harrowing tale of dreams and violence gone awry.

Tulsa, Oklahoma, 1921. A white woman and a black man are alone in an elevator. Suddenly, the woman screams, the man flees, and the chase to capture and lynch him begins.

When Joe Samuels, a young Black man with dreams of becoming the next Houdini, is accused of rape, he must perform his greatest escape by eluding a bloodthirsty mob.

Meanwhile, Mary Keane, the white, motherless daughter of a farmer who wants to marry her off to the farmhand who viciously raped her, must find the courage to help exonerate the man she accused with her panicked cry.

Magic City evokes one of the darkest chapters of twentieth century, Jim Crow America, painting an intimate portrait of the heroic but doomed stand that pitted the National Guard against a small band of black men determined to defend the prosperous town they had built.

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS:

Dr. Jewell Parker Rhodes is the author of six adult novels: Voodoo Dreams, Magic City, Douglass’ Women, Season, Moon, and Hurricane, as well as the memoir Porch Stories: A Grandmother’s Guide to Happiness, and two writing guides, Free Within Ourselves: Fiction Lessons for Black Authors and The African American Guide to Writing and Publishing Non-Fiction. Her adult literary awards include the American Book Award, the National Endowment of the Arts Award in Fiction, the Black Caucus of the American Library Award for Literary Excellence, and the PEN Oakland/Josephine Miles Award for Outstanding Writing. Jewell grew up in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and earned a Bachelor of Arts in Drama Criticism, a Master of Arts in English, and a Doctor of Arts in English (Creative Writing) from Carnegie Mellon University. Jewell is the Founding Artistic Director and Piper Endowed Chair at the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing at Arizona State University. She currently lives in Seattle.

View in Catalog: Magic City by Jewell Parker Rhodes

We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations. Captions are available for all recorded Library programs.

For registration information and other questions, Ask Us or 206-386-4636.

Virtual Write with Hugo House: Seattle Writes @ Online (see listing)
May 12 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

Attend free drop-in writing circles facilitated by established local writers from Hugo House! Bring something you’re working on, or just come ready to write. Registration required.

To receive the link for this event, please click here and select the red date you want to attend. Phone registration also available at 206-322-7030.

In this group, we’ll focus on generative writing through poetry prompts. The session will begin with introductions and a short warm-up, after which we’ll read two separate poems and write in response to those. At times writers will be invited to create community through sharing words or ideas with other writers in small groups. Attendees will leave the class with 2-3 new drafts of poems. Designed for all writers, this group supports poets as well those working in other genres, as the skills practiced in poetry can be thought of as “cross-training” for memoir and fiction, too.

Jeanine Walker was a 2015 Jack Straw Writer and has published poems in Cimarron Review, Narrative, Pleiades, and Web Conjunctions. She holds a Ph.D. in Creative Writing from the University of Houston and teaches for Writers in the Schools.

Library events and programs are free and everyone is welcome. Have a laptop or pen and paper — and be ready to write!

We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations. Captions are available for all recorded Library programs.

May
13
Thu
Words, Writers and Southwest Stories: David Williams: “Homewaters: A Human and Natural History of Puget Sound” @ Online (see listing)
May 13 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

‘Words, Writers & SouthWest Stories,’ a historically-based speaker series of the Southwest Seattle Historical Society, is excited to announce that it is hosting David Williams for a live Zoom presentation on Thursday, May 13 at 6:00 PM. Williams will be interviewed by series chair Dora-Faye Hendricks about his book, “Homewaters: A Human and Natural History of Puget Sound.” Registration is required. Please register HERE.

Focusing on the area south of Port Townsend and between the Cascade and Olympic mountains, Williams uncovers human and natural histories in, on, and around the Sound. In conversations with archaeologists, biologists, and tribal authorities, Williams traces how generations of humans have interacted with such species as geoducks, salmon, orcas, rockfish, and herring. He sheds light on how warfare shaped development and how people have moved across this maritime highway, in canoes, the mosquito fleet, and today’s ferry system. The book also takes an unflinching look at how the Sound’s ecosystems have suffered from human behavior, including pollution, habitat destruction, and the effects of climate change.

David B. Williams is a naturalist, author, and educator. His many books include the award-winning Too High and Too Steep: Reshaping Seattle’s Topography and Seattle Walks: Discovering History and Nature in the City.

This series is open to hosting any author or speaker addressing historical issues relating to the Puget Sound/Duwamish Peninsula and/or the general public. Additional information on future presentations can be obtained by contacting Dora-Faye Hendricks, Chair, ‘Words, Writers & SouthWest Stories’ by phone at 206-290-8315 or by e-mail at Dora-Faye@comcast.net.

‘Words, Writers & Southwest Stories,’ a historically-based speaker series of the Southwest Seattle Historical Society, is offered in partnership with The Southwest Seattle Historical Society and The Seattle Public Library.

May
15
Sat
El Club Latino Virtual @ Online (see listing)
May 15 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

La discusión se llevará a cabo completamente en español a través de la plataforma de reuniones en línea WebEx. El espacio es limitado. Por favor, haga clic aquí para inscribirse. Por favor, haga clic aquí para inscribirse.

Únase al Club de Lectura de la Biblioteca Central. Todos son bienvenidos. El libro de este mes es: El olvido que seremos de Héctor Abad Faciolince.

El 25 de agosto de 1987 Héctor Abad Gómez, médico y activista en pro de los derechos humanos, es asesinado en Medellín por los paramilitares. El olvido que seremos es su biografía novelada, escrita por su propio hijo. Un relato desgarrador y emocionante sobre la familia, que refleja, al tiempo, el infierno de la violencia que ha golpeado Colombia en los últimos cincuenta años. La novella ha sido ganadora del Premio WOLA-Duke en Derechos Humanos en Estados Unidos y del Prémio Criaçao Literária Casa da America Latina de Portugal.

View in Catalog: El olvido que seremos by Héctor Abad Faciolince

Translation: Join El Club Latino and spend a pleasant time talking about books and Latin American culture. El Club Latino meets once a month.

We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations. Captions are available for all recorded Library programs.

May
16
Sun
Clarion West & Seattle Writes Presents Beyond Afrofuturism: Black Editors And Publishers In Speculative Fiction @ Online (see listing)
May 16 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Clarion West and Seattle Writes presents Beyond Afrofuturism: Power in Publishing: Publishers Roundtable. Registration required. Click here to register on our partner’s website.

Beyond Afrofuturism: Black Editors and Publishers in Speculative Fiction

Join us for a series of conversations featuring today’s Black publishers and editors of anthologies and magazines, aimed at expanding our understanding of the ways in which editorial roles impact the worlds of speculative fiction. Dates: 4/12, 5/16, 5/17

This series is presented in partnership with the Seattle Public Library and is supported by The Seattle Public Library Foundation.

Power in Publishing: Publishers Roundtable

Featuring: Bill Campbell (Rosarium), Milton Davis (MVmedia), Zelda Knight (AURELIA LEO), and Nicole Givens Kurtz (Mocha Memoirs)

With major publishers stuck in a cycle of selling the same mainstream stories or tightening their belts when it comes to the work of marginalized communities, how are Black publishers shaping opportunities for BIPOC writers to have their voices heard?

About the Panelists:

Bill Campbell (Rosarium)

Bill Campbell is the author of Sunshine Patriots, My Booty Novel, and the anti-racism satire, Koontown Killing Kaper. Along with Edward Austin Hall, he co-edited the groundbreaking anthology, Mothership: Tales from Afrofuturism and Beyond. He also co-edited Stories for Chip: A Tribute to Samuel R. Delany with Nisi Shawl, Future Fiction: New Dimensions in International Science Fiction and Fantasy with Francesco Verso, and APB: Artists against Police Brutality with Jason Rodriguez and John Jennings. His Afrofuturist spaceploitation graphic novel, Baaaad Muthaz (with David Brame and Damian Duffy) was released in 2019. His historical graphic novel with Bizhan Khodabandeh, The Day the Klan Came to Town, will be released by PM Press in 2021. Campbell lives in Washington, DC, where he spends his time with his family and helms Rosarium Publishing.

Milton Davis (MVmedia)

Milton Davis is an award winning Black Speculative fiction writer and owner of MVmedia, LLC, a publishing company specializing in Science Fiction and Fantasy based on African/African Disapora history, culture and traditions. Milton is the author of nineteen novels and short story collections; his most recent the Sword and Soul adventure A Debt To Pay. Milton is also a contributing author to the upcoming Black Panther: Tales of Wakanda, published by Marvel and Titan Books and coauthor of Hadithi and the State of Black Speculative Fiction with Eugen Bacon. He is the editor and co-editor of eight anthologies; The City, Dark Universe and Dark Universe: The Bright Empire with Gene Peterson; Griots: A Sword and Soul Anthology and Griot: Sisters of the Spear, with Charles R. Saunders; The Ki Khanga Anthology, the Steamfunk! Anthology, and the Dieselfunk anthology with Balogun Ojetade. Milton’s work had also been featured in Black Power: The Superhero Anthology and Rococoa published by Roaring Lions Productions; Skelos 2: The Journal of Weird Fiction and Dark Fantasy, Steampunk Writers Around the World published by Luna Press; Heroika: Dragoneaters published by First Perseid Press, Bass Reeves Frontier Marshal Volume Two, Slay: Stories of the Vampire Noire, and Black Panther: Tales of Wakanda by Marvel/Titan Books. Milton Davis and Balogun Ojetade won the 2014 Urban Action Showcase Award for Best Script. Milton’s story The Swarm was nominated for the 2017 British Science Fiction Association Award for Short Fiction and his story, Carnival, has been nominated for the 2020 British Science Fiction Association Award for Short Fiction.

Zelda Knight (AURELIA LEO)

Zelda Knight is the publisher and editor-in-chief of AURELIA LEO, a small press based in Louisville, Kentucky. She has published over one-hundred authors, artists, and poets from around the world. She is also the co-editor of Dominion: An Anthology of Speculative Fiction from Africa and the African Diaspora (AURELIA LEO, 2020), which has received critical acclaim! Keep in touch on social media @AuthorZKnight. Or, visit www.zeldaknight.com.

We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations. Captions are available for all recorded Library programs.

May
17
Mon
Clarion West & Seattle Writes Presents Beyond Afrofuturism: Black Editors And Publishers In Speculative Fiction @ Online (see listing)
May 17 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Clarion West and Seattle Writes presents Beyond Afrofuturism: Zines and Magazines: Expanding Worlds in Speculative Fiction. Registration required. Click here to register on our partner’s website.

Beyond Afrofuturism: Black Editors and Publishers in Speculative Fiction

Join us for a series of conversations featuring today’s Black publishers and editors of anthologies and magazines, aimed at expanding our understanding of the ways in which editorial roles impact the worlds of speculative fiction. Dates: 4/12, 5/16, 5/17

This series is presented in partnership with the Seattle Public Library and is supported by The Seattle Public Library Foundation.

Zines and Magazines: Expanding Worlds in Speculative Fiction

Date: Monday, May 17th, 7 p.m. Pacific

Featuring: Eboni Dunbar (FIYAH Magazine), Craig Laurance Gidney (Baffling Magazine), Brent Lambert (FIYAH Magazine), Chinelo Onwualu (Omenana/Anathema) and LaShawn Wanak (Giganotosaurus).

Join prominent Black editors of online zines and magazines as they discuss their journeys into editing and the role editors play in creating space for the voices of BIPOC communities in the speculative fiction field.

Moderated by Arley Sorg of Locus and Fantasy Magazine.

About the Panelists:

Craig Laurance Gidney (Baffling magazine)

Craig Laurance Gidney writes both contemporary and genre fiction. He is the author of the collections Sea, Swallow Me & Other Stories (Lethe Press, 2008), Skin Deep Magic (Rebel Satori Press, 2014), Bereft (Tiny Satchel Press, 2013) and A Spectral Hue (Word Horde, 2019). He is the co-editor of Baffling Magazine (along with dave ring), an online magazine of queer speculation fiction.

Chinelo Onwualu (Omenana/Anathema)

I am a Nigerian writer and editor living in Toronto. I’m the non-fiction editor of Anathema Magazine, and co-founder of Omenana, a magazine of African Speculative Fiction. I’m also former chief spokesperson for the African Speculative Fiction Society. My short stories have been featured in Slate, Uncanny, Strange Horizons, The Kalahari Review, and Brittle Paper, as well as in several anthologies including the award-winning New Suns: Original Speculative Fiction from People of Colour edited by Nisi Shawl. You can find me on my website at: www.chineloonwualu.com or follow me on Twitter @chineloonwualu.

Arley Sorg (Fantasy)

Arley Sorg is co-Editor-in-Chief at Fantasy Magazine, as well as associate editor at Locus Magazine and both Lightspeed & Nightmare Magazines. He reviews books for Locus, Lightspeed, and Cascadia Subduction Zone and is an interviewer for Clarkesworld Magazine. Arley grew up in England, Hawaii, and Colorado, and studied Asian Religions at Pitzer College. He lives in Oakland, and, in non-pandemic times, usually writes in local coffee shops. He is a 2014 Odyssey Writing Workshop graduate.

Eboni Dunbar (FIYAH)

Eboni J Dunbar (She/her) is a queer, black woman who writes queer and black speculative fiction. She lives in the San Francisco Bay Area with her partner. She received her BA from Macalester College in English and her MFA in Creative Writing from Mills College. She is a VONA Alum, a former associate editor for PodCastle, a managing editor for FIYAH Literary Magazine, and a freelance reviewer. Her work can be found in FIYAH Literary Magazine, Drabblecast, Anathema: Spec from the margins and Nightlight Podcast. She also has a novella out now from Neon Hemlock called Stone and Steel. You can follow her on twitter @sugoionna87.

LaShawn M. Wanak (Giganotosaurus/Uncanny)

LaShawn M. Wanak lives in Wisconsin with her husband and son. She writes science fiction, fantasy, and a little bit of horror. Her works have been published in Fireside Magazine, FIYAH, Uncanny Magazine, and many others. She is the editor of the online magazine GigaNotoSaurus and a book reviewer for Lightspeed Magazine. When she is not working at her dayjob as an administrative assistant, she enjoys knitting, anime, and wrestling with theological truths from a Black womanist perspective. Writing stories keeps her sane. Also, pie.

Brent Lambert (FIYAH)

Comic books, SFF and good cooking are the essential elements of SFF author Brent Lambert. A full-fledged military brat, he is consistently struck by wanderlust and has a keen sense of things never really being permanent. Currently based out of San Diego, he gets to enjoy sunshine for more than half the year. Always working, he’s determined to allow Black Queer men to be the stars of their own stories. He can be found on Twitter @brentclambert

Visit Clarion West website for more events.

We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations. Captions are available for all recorded Library programs.

May
19
Wed
Virtual Children’s Story Time @ Online (see listing)
May 19 @ 10:00 am – 10:20 am

It is story time! Gather your preschoolers and toddlers to enjoy stories, rhymes, songs and fun with one of our children’s librarians.

Catch the premier on our Kids’ YouTube Channel

We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations. Captions are available for all recorded story time programs.

May
25
Tue
The A. Scott Bullitt Lecture In American History Presents Michelle Duster @ Online (see listing)
May 25 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

In 1862, Ida B. Wells was born enslaved in Holly Springs, Mississippi. In 2020, she won a Pulitzer Prize. Join us to hear Michelle Duster discuss the impact of this iconic woman. Registration required. Click here to register.

Ida B. Wells was often overlooked and underestimated—a woman who refused to exit a train car meant for white passengers; a woman brought to light the horrors of lynching in America; a woman who cofounded the NAACP. Hear professor and Wells’s great-granddaughter Michelle Duster, offer a “warm remembrance of a civil rights icon” (Kirkus Reviews).

The A. Scott Bullitt Lecture in American History is made possible by a generous gift from the late Priscilla Bullitt Collins in honor of her father, A. Scott Bullitt. This event is supported by The Seattle Public Library Foundation, author series sponsor Gary Kunis, and media sponsor The Seattle Times, and presented in partnership with The Elliott Bay Book Co. This program will recorded, captioned and posted for 30 days on The Seattle Public Library’s YouTube page after the event.

ABOUT THE BOOK:

Journalist. Suffragist. Antilynching crusader. Ida B. Wells committed herself to the needs of those who did not have power. In the eyes of the FBI, this made her a “dangerous negro agitator.” In the annals of history, it makes her an icon.

A century after her death, Wells’s genius is being celebrated in popular culture by politicians, through song, public artwork, and landmarks. Like her contemporaries Frederick Douglass and Susan B. Anthony, Wells left an indelible mark on history—one that can still be felt today. As America confronts the unfinished business of systemic racism, Ida B. the Queen pays tribute to a transformational leader and reminds us of the power we all hold to smash the status quo.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER:

Michelle Duster is a writer, speaker, professor, and champion of racial and gender equity. In the last dozen years, she has written, edited, or contributed to eleven books. She cowrote the popular children’s history book, Tate and His Historic Dream; coedited Shifts and Michelle Obama’s Impact on African American Women and Girls; and edited two books that include the writings of her great-grandmother, Ida B. Wells. She has written articles for Essence, Refinery29, HuffPost, Teen Vogue, and The North Star.

PRAISE:

“Visually stunning…readers who are looking for bold, out-of-the-box, approaches to social change will undoubtedly be inspired by Ida B. the Queen.”
—Forbes

“Bow down to this biography that shows why Ida B. Wells is an icon for all seasons.”
—Refinery29

“With bold graphics and a compelling story, Ida B. the Queen is sure to be one of the year’s best biographies.”
—Bustle

“Ida B. the Queen delves deep into the life of Wells and the Black experience through visual storytelling and recounts the life, successes and hardships of one of the most renowned leaders of justice in American history.”
—The Root

View in Catalog: Ida B. the Queen by Michelle Duster

We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations. Captions are available for all recorded Library programs.

For registration information and other questions, Ask Us or 206-386-4636.

May
26
Wed
Virtual Children’s Story Time @ Online (see listing)
May 26 @ 10:00 am – 10:20 am

It is story time! Gather your preschoolers and toddlers to enjoy stories, rhymes, songs and fun with one of our children’s librarians.

Catch the premier on our Kids’ YouTube Channel

We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations. Captions are available for all recorded story time programs.

Jun
2
Wed
Virtual Children’s Story Time @ Online (see listing)
Jun 2 @ 10:00 am – 10:20 am

It is story time! Gather your preschoolers and toddlers to enjoy stories, rhymes, songs and fun with one of our children’s librarians.

Catch the premier on our Kids’ YouTube Channel

We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations. Captions are available for all recorded story time programs.

Jun
9
Wed
Virtual Children’s Story Time @ Online (see listing)
Jun 9 @ 10:00 am – 10:20 am

It is story time! Gather your preschoolers and toddlers to enjoy stories, rhymes, songs and fun with one of our children’s librarians.

Catch the premier on our Kids’ YouTube Channel

We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations. Captions are available for all recorded story time programs.

Jun
13
Sun
Virtual Writers Read @ Online (see listing)
Jun 13 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Join us for a monthly reading series featuring an open mic and selected author readings from local writers. Registration is required. Click here to register on our partner’s website.

Local writers will read from their diverse repertoires of poetry, short stories, novels and essays. The event will end with a Q&A session, followed by an open mic session.

This program is presented in partnership with African-American Writers’ Alliance on the second Sunday of the month.

Ability to use Zoom on your own computer or phone is required for this program.
Registration is Required.

We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations. Captions are available for all recorded Library programs.

Jun
16
Wed
Virtual Children’s Story Time @ Online (see listing)
Jun 16 @ 10:00 am – 10:20 am

It is story time! Gather your preschoolers and toddlers to enjoy stories, rhymes, songs and fun with one of our children’s librarians.

Catch the premier on our Kids’ YouTube Channel

We can provide accommodations for people with disabilities at Library events. Please contact leap@spl.org at least seven days before the event to request accommodations. Captions are available for all recorded story time programs.