West Seattle history 709 results

FOLLOWUP: Checking in on the Stone Cottage

March 10, 2021 7:02 pm
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 |   How to help | West Seattle history | West Seattle news

(January photo by Mark Jaroslaw)

From the “in case you wondered too” file: We received a question about what’s up with the Stone Cottage, the little old stone-studded bungalow awaiting its move off the to-be-redeveloped corner parcel at 1123 Harbor SW. So we asked Save the Stone Cottage, whose Jeff McCord tells WSB there’s no official date yet for the move, but they’re expecting news “soon.” The crowdfunding campaign continues, too – they’re about 55 percent of the way to the $110,000 goal for the first phase of moving and storing the Stone Cottage while a permanent new home is found.

HISTORY: ‘Here for the Beer’ next Friday

The next special online presentation from the Southwest Seattle Historical Society is all about beer. Here’s the announcement:

The Southwest Seattle Historical Society is delighted to announce “Here for the Beer! How Craft Beer Has Shaped Seattle’s Community Identity,” a live Zoom presentation and panel discussion on Friday, February 26 at 5:30 PM. Join us for a presentation mapping out the history of craft beer in Seattle, and hear from local favorites The Good Society, Future Primitive Brewing, and Elliott Bay Brewing Company as to what makes beer on the Duwamish Peninsula so unique. Registration is required.

Craft brewing hit the beer market for the first time in the 1980s, and since then has revolutionized the way that beer is produced and sold in the United States. The Pacific Northwest quickly became a hub for great beer, and today Seattle is especially known for its local breweries in every neighborhood. We’ll explore a brief history of craft beer in the Pacific Northwest with Maggie Kase, the Programs and Interpretation Coordinator at the Southwest Seattle Historical Society. Then, we’ll zoom in on the Duwamish Peninsula to hear firsthand why beer is such a big part of Seattleites’ sense of community identity, and what makes beer in West Seattle and White Center so special.

Thank you to our partners The Good Society, Future Primitive Brewing, and Elliott Bay Brewing Company for making this program possible.

For more details and to register, please visit our website or contact Maggie at programs@loghousemuseum.org.

STONE COTTAGE: ‘Story Stones’ events wrap up as move looms

February 15, 2021 9:34 pm
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 |   How to help | West Seattle history | West Seattle news

The community campaign to Save The Stone Cottage continues. Tonight, two notes – first, the results of the final “Story Stones” competition. If you missed the karaoke-style concert/trivia event last Friday night, here’s the first 15 minutes:

At about 6:40 in, you’ll see the first singers, Lora and Steve from the West Seattle Junction Association – then in the final minute, 14 minutes in, Caspar Babypants‘ guest performance. Everyone who showed up for the event on Zoom had the chance to answer trivia questions related to the songs. Winners were Dan and Joanie Jacobs, who get a gift certificate to a West Seattle restaurant and the coveted fourth and final “Story Stone.” Guest performers also included reps from local businesses both musical (including WSB sponsors Thunder Road Guitars and The Bass Shop, and of course Easy Street Records) and not (Husky Deli, Beveridge Place Pub, Salty’s [WSB sponsor], and more). Now, an update on the plan to move the Stone Cottage before its longtime home at 1123 Harbor Avenue SW gets redeveloped:

(January photo by Mark Jaroslaw)

Jeff McCord from Save The Stone Cottage tells WSB, “We don’t know an exact move date due to the developer’s permitting still being underway. We will of course announce more details as we learn them, but we believe it may not occur until sometime in March (or possibly later) at this point.” They’re still actively crowdfunding to pay for the move and a temporary home for the historic stone-studded structure.

ADDED TUESDAY: See the entire concert/music-trivia event here.

TONIGHT: Save The Stone Cottage invites you to the Karaoke Rock Concert & Music Trivia Competition

February 12, 2021 9:31 am
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 |   Fun stuff to do | West Seattle history | West Seattle news | WS culture/arts

(Stone Cottage, circa 1940s)

As moving day nears for the historic Stone Cottage, the volunteers working to save it are inviting you to the last of four “Finding the Story Stones” events – live online tonight, the family-friendly Karaoke Rock Concert & Music Trivia Competition. Some of the singing’s already handled:

In the photo, Save The Stone Cottage committee member Mike Shaughnessy recorded Steve Theile and Lora Radford of the West Seattle Junction Association singing the Steve Miller Band‘s “Rock’n Me” in the middle of Walk All Ways.

They’re among the local business owners and special guests – including Chris Ballew (Caspar Babypants) and Blaine Cook (Zippy’s Giant Burgers and rocker) and more! It’s an interactive event that will allow you to join in the fun and compete for prizes; the :winner” of the fourth and final Story Stone will unlock the “Story of the Duwamish.”

It’s happening on Zoom at 7 pm tonight if you want to participate in trivia; if not, you can also just view here.

P.S. Crowdfunding for the Stone Cottage’s move to its new temporary home continues here.

WORDS, WRITERS, SOUTHWEST STORIES: Scandalous history, this time

February 9, 2021 2:14 pm
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 |   West Seattle history | West Seattle news | West Seattle online

Thursday night, the Southwest Seattle Historical Society invites you to learn about a scandalous chapter in the city’s history – in case you haven’t already seen it in our Event Calendar, here’s the announcement:

‘Words, Writers & SouthWest Stories,’ a history-based speaker series of the Southwest Seattle Historical Society, is delighted to host local author and historian Brad Holden for a live Zoom presentation on Thursday, February 11 at 6:00 PM. Holden will deliver a presentation about his book, “Seattle Prohibition: Bootleggers, Rumrunners and Graft in the Queen City.” Registration is required. Please register HERE.

Prohibition consumed Seattle, igniting a war that lasted nearly twenty years and played out in the streets, waterways and even town hall. Roy Olmstead, formerly a Seattle police officer, became the King of the Seattle Bootleggers, and Johnny Schnarr, running liquor down from Canada, revolutionized the speedboat industry. Frank Gatt, a south Seattle restaurateur, started the state’s biggest moonshining operation. Skirting around the law, the Coast Guard and the zealous assistant director of the Seattle Prohibition Bureau, William Whitney, was no simple feat, but many rose to the challenge. Join us to hear Brad Holden tell the spectacular story of Seattle in the time of Prohibition.

Brad Holden is a local author, historian and “finder of old things.” When not out searching for local historical artifacts, he enjoys writing about Seattle’s past. His work has appeared in Pacific Northwest Magazine, and he is a contributing writer for HistoryLink.org. Brad is also the author of “Seattle Prohibition: Bootleggers, Rumrunners & Graft in the Queen City,” and his next book — a biography about mysterious Seattle inventor and psychedelic pioneer Al Hubbard — is due to be published later this year.

This series is open to hosting any author or speaker addressing historical issues relating to the Puget Sound/Duwamish Peninsula and/or the general public. Additional information on future presentations can be obtained by contacting Dora-Faye Hendricks, Chair, ‘Words, Writers & SouthWest Stories’ by phone at 206-290-8315 or by e-mail at Dora-Faye@comcast.net.

ONE MORE WEEK: Southwest Seattle Historical Society’s youth writing contest, with cash prizes

February 8, 2021 5:53 pm
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 |   West Seattle history | West Seattle news

Reminder to students thinking about, or planning on, entering the Southwest Seattle Historical Society‘s first-ever writing contest for youth – the deadline for entries is now one week away! The theme, as originally announced, is “Women History Makers of the Duwamish Peninsula.” From the SWSHS announcement:

Students should submit an essay that explores the contributions of a specific woman from the Duwamish Peninsula who has made a historical impact on the community, past or present, famous or not-yet-famous. Essays will be accepted in English, Spanish, and Vietnamese.

Winners will be selected in each grade category outlined below:

Grades: 3 – 5: 250 words maximum
Grades: 6 — 8: 500 words maximum
Grades: 9 – 12: 750 words maximum
Essays will be judged by a panel of SWSHS staff, volunteers, and community partners based on the following criteria:

Demonstrated understanding of the woman as a person and the role she has played or is playing in the history of the Duwamish Peninsula
Effective use of descriptive language.
Correct punctuation, spelling, and grammar
For grades 6 and up, appropriate citations in any reference style.

The winner in the high school category will receive a $125 cash prize and the winner in middle school category will receive a $75 cash prize. Winners in all categories will receive a special certificate and gift from the Southwest Seattle Historical Society and Paper Boat Booksellers. Winning essays will also be published on the Historical Society’s website and West Seattle Blog. Best of all, winners will be honored at a special digital event hosted by the Historical Society!

The deadline for entries is 5 pm February 15th. Go here to enter.

WEST SEATTLE HISTORY: See who and what was at the original Luna Park

If you’ve lived in West Seattle for more than a few minutes, you’ve probably heard about the short-lived early-20th-century amusement park Luna Park at the peninsula’s northern tip, likely even seen a few photos. But you probably haven’t heard or seen most of what West Seattle resident Paul Moyes shows you in the video above – Luna Park inside and out. Paul told WSB via email, “It is a detailed breakdown of the layout, location, and attractions of the amusement park. It proved a lot of fun researching where all the buildings and rides were located, and also discovering the names and a bit of backstory on the performers that entertained the throngs there.” Paul is not a historian – he told us he moved here in the ’90s (from Michigan) to study oceanography at UW – but has “enjoyed photography for a while (instagram.com/paulmoyes)” and this is his first video. “I’m considering learning more about videography and doing more vids in the future. I had such a great time on this one I think I caught the bug.”

FOLLOWUP: Vandalized West Seattle Junction mural to be restored

(WSB photo, last month)

Two weeks ago, we reported on vandalism defacing this mural on the West Seattle Junction Post Office – someone splashing beige paint over the depictions of a woman and two children of color, just to the right side of the parade-float royalty in the scene. Volunteers removed some of the paint, but couldn’t get it all. The West Seattle Junction Association announced today that donations will cover the cost of restoration:

Through the generosity of community donors, a $500 donation from the Alki Art Fair, and a significant donation from Mashiko, we can move forward restoring the mural and applying a critical graffiti coating to the entire surface.

WSJA executive director Lora Radford tells WSB that muralist Bob Henry, who has restored other historic West Seattle murals, will do the work when it gets a little warmer and drier. P.S. The mural-restoration crowdfunding campaign is still ongoing, here.

FINALE: Rock out during 4th event in series presented by Save The Stone Cottage

(Photo by Stewart L.)

As preparations continue to move the Stone Cottage off its to-be-redeveloped site at 1123 Harbor SW, the volunteer preservationists working to save it have one more event ahead – here’s their update:

In a race to beat the wrecking ball, throughout January 2021 the “Save The Stone Cottage” committee has put on a series of educational, entertaining, and inspiring events called “Finding the Story Stones,” to raise awareness about our fundraising drive.

Finding each of the “Story Stones” has been unlocking elements of the unusual stories surrounding the Stone Cottage, Eva Falk, and the early history of Seattle and Alki. The final of these four fun activities will be held on February 12, capping off the series of fun events.

Finding Story Stone #4: “Karaoke Rock Concert”
February 12, 2021 at 7 pm

The Karaoke Rock Concert is the last of the four “Finding The Story Stones” events produced by The “Save the Stone Cottage” Committee, and is a musical-themed, family-friendly event. Originally scheduled for the end of January to coincide with the moving of the Stone Cottage, this event is being held in February as the Stone Cottage is in its final stages of preparation for the move, which is expected to be in mid-February.

The “Karaoke Rock Concert’ will include music, music trivia and will feature some special guest appearances. This interactive event will allow viewers and participants to join in the fun and compete for prizes! The ‘winner’ of the fourth and final Story Stone will unlock the “Story of the Duwamish.”

Event date and time: Friday, February 12, 2021; 7 pm
Location: Online Zoom viewing event; participants will submit their guesses and answers on Twitter.
Details: Anyone can join, view and participate.

So far three of the four “Story Stones” have been claimed. In early January, Tanya Johnson guessed the number of stones on the front façade of the Stone Cottage within 274 stones of the actual number, unlocking the first Story Stone. Then, Keefe Leung solved a series of six rhyming clues that led him to discover the second Story Stone hidden in the bow of the Sasha Eli, an aluminum “dory,” or boat, ‘frozen in time’ at the Whale Tail playground adjacent to Alki Elementary. And, finally, last weekend Beata Stensager completed “Walking in Eva’s Shoes,” having trekked all the way from the Alki Lighthouse to the Stone Cottage and visiting the five interpretive stops along the way. Beata was able to answer all five questions correctly to win the third Story Stone and a gift certificate to a local restaurant.

Save The Stone Cottage continues crowdfunding to cover the cost of moving the structure and storing it until a permanent new home is found.

LISTEN: All Ways West Seattle podcast’s new episode spotlights a drink, a legend, and us

For your weekend listening consideration: The newest episode of what we would describe as definitive peninsula podcast, All Ways West Seattle. This time, host Keith Bacon features three topics: First, West 5 – as the restaurant/bar approaches its 18th anniversary – with a look at its legendary Mai Tai. Speaking of legends, you’ll also hear from the person whose quirky art installation is a tribute of sorts to the man at the heart of the West Seattle Bridge’s oddest story – the freighter pilot who took out the old bridge in 1978, Rolf Neslund, And the third segment of All Ways West Seattle’s new episode is a chat with your editor here, who founded the site 15 years ago as something very different from what it has become. (Here’s an audio snippet that Keith tweeted.) Here’s the full episode. If none of those topics interest you, see what else has been spotlighted in the podcast’s archived episodes here.

‘Who Writes My History Books?’ Free online tours offered by Southwest Seattle Historical Society

January 29, 2021 9:31 am
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 |   West Seattle history | West Seattle news

(Log House Museum, file photo)

The home of West Seattle’s history is offering a new virtual experience – here’s the announcement:

The Southwest Seattle Historical Society is pleased to announce its first digital tour experience “Who Writes My History Books? Why Your Voice Matters In Living History.” Join us for an online tour to experience the enrichment that an in-person field trip experience affords, even while we can’t be together. This tour is open for student groups Grades 6 – 12, and any interested adult groups. Sign ups are required at least two weeks before your desired tour date. “Who Writes My History Books?” is a free experience. Tours will be available from 11 AM – 3 PM on Thursdays and Fridays on a first-come first-served basis. Tours will be capped at 25 for school groups and 12 for adult groups.

“Who Writes My History Books?” breaks down the historical process, and empowers students to document their thoughts and experiences as active witnesses of history. By the end of the tour, participants should:

-Understand why individual accounts of history matter (including yours!)

-Be familiar with the basic steps of the historical process

-Have practice asking questions to better understand historical documents

-Be exposed to the idea that history is constantly being rewritten. Our understanding of history can seem static, but how we interpret history changes all the time!

To register, please visit www.loghousemuseum.org, call 206-350-0999, or email museum@loghousemuseum.org. Tours run for approximately one hour. Tour availability is based on docent availability and is subject to change.

Volunteer storytelling along Alki path of ‘Walking in Eva’s Shoes’ – and a winner!

(WSB photo)

Until 2 pm, you can be “Walking in Eva’s Shoes” and finding Save The Stone Cottage volunteers at any or all of five historic spots on Alki. We stopped by Luna/Anchor Park and found local historians Clay Eals (above left) and Ken Workman (above right) – a descendant of Chief Seattle – there to share stories including the site’s fame as home to a waterfront amusement park more than a century ago. This is all to commemorate how the Stone Cottage (1123 Harbor SW) got its unique look – with wagonloads of beach stones hauled by Eva Falk and her family from Alki Point to the bungalow’s site across from Don Armeni Boat Ramp. The Stone Cottage itself is another of the stops along today’s self-guided walk, as are the Alki Point Lighthouse, the “Birthplace of Seattle” monument at 63rd/Alki, and the Southwest Seattle Historical Society’s Log House Museum at 61st/Stevens. More info here; this is all part of a series of events sponsored by the local advocates working to preserve the Stone Cottage, crowdfunding to move it to an interim site before a redevelopment project starts where it is now.

P.S. Today’s walk also featured optional participation in a search for the third “Story Stone” – just as we finished writing this, we got word there’s been a winner – Beata S.:

(Photo courtesy Save The Stone Cottage)

Save The Stone Cottage’s Jeff McCord says, “Beata S. impressed us all by not only completing the “Walking in Eva’s Shoes” walking event at 11:33 am this morning, but answering all five puzzle questions correctly! Congratulations, Beata!!” Here’s her story.

STONE COTTAGE: Moving preparations continue, as you’re invited to ‘Walk in Eva’s Shoes’ this Saturday

Thanks to Mark Jaroslaw for the photo. Structure-moving specialists Nickel Bros were back at the Stone Cottage (1123 Harbor SW) to continue preparing to move the rock-covered bungalow off its site before the property’s new owners start their redevelopment project. The preservation advocates who formed Save The Stone Cottage continue crowdfunding to pay for the move, and are also continuing a series of community events to keep it top of mind. Next one is this weekend – here’s the announcement:

Saturday, January 23, 2021: “Walking in Eva’s Shoes” event on Alki, starting at the Lighthouse, 10 am to 2 pm.

Looking for fun family-friendly activities to do outside with the whole crew? Experience “Walking in Eva’s Shoes,” the third event hosted by the “Save the Stone Cottage” committee in the “Finding the Lost Stones” contest series.

Does it seem like ages that you’ve been ‘bubbled up at home’ with little ones, with not much to do? Here’s an opportunity for some fun family time on a familiar shoreline path but instead you get to ‘see’ Alki of the 1930s through the eyes of a Seattle family as they collected stones to cover their home.

That little house on Harbor Ave SW known as Eva’s Stone Cottage is now the focus of the “Save the Stone Cottage” committee’s fundraising drive. We plan to move the house out of the way of pending demolition and give it a new life.To raise awareness of these efforts, we’re hosting a series of educational, entertaining, and inspiring events called “Finding the Story Stones.” These four “Story Stones” unlock elements of the unusual stories surrounding the Stone Cottage, Eva Falk, and the early history of Seattle & Alki.

Now is the chance for you and your family to relive history by “Walking in Eva’s Shoes” from the Alki Lighthouse to the Stone Cottage, symbolically recreating the 1930’s journey that Eva Falk and her family took. Along the way, there are five interpretive stops where a history volunteer will tell the fascinating stories behind some remarkable locations we have right here in our own backyard on Alki, the Birthplace of Seattle.

● The Alki Lighthouse (3201 Alki Avenue SW – start your journey here)
● The Birthplace of Seattle Monument
● The Log House Museum
● Anchor Park (former location of Luna Park amusement park)
● and the Stone Cottage itself.

This event will take place from 10 am to 2 pm on Saturday, January 23, 2021. It is open to anyone, and meant to be accessible. Participants are encouraged to walk the beautiful route, although those who may be less mobile can bike, scooter, skate or drive if they wish to. At each of the interpretive stops along the way the historical interpretive volunteers will tell a short story on each of the historical landmarks. For example:

*Anchor Park at Duwamish Head is the former 12-acre amusement park known as Luna Park. Opening in 1907, the rides operated until 1913, and the pool closed after a 1931 fire. Built on pilings over the water, Luna Park extended over Elliott Bay and was called the ‘greatest Amusement Park on the West Coast.” Today, during very low tides, one can spot remnants of the park pilings that offer a glimpse into an exciting past.

(DID SOMEONE SAY PUZZLES??) For those who also wish to compete for the third Story Stone, a gift certificate at a local West Seattle restaurant (for takeout or outdoor seating), and bragging rights, you can solve the five puzzles along your route and be the first to correctly answer all five puzzle answers once you arrive at the last stop at Stone Cottage. Although there is only one who will achieve the honor of unlocking the Story Stone, all who participate will be “winners” because of the fun and educational experience they’ll have during this event.

So far two of the four “Story Stones” have been claimed.

The fourth event will be a live “Stone Cottage Karaoke Rock Concert” on January 30th. Find out more at Save The Stone Cottage’s website; if you’re interested in donating to the moving fund, go here.

HISTORY: Learn about Alki fishing derbies in online presentation Thursday

(Photo courtesy Southwest Seattle Historical Society)

Tomorrow night, you are invited to set sail into another chapter of local history. Here’s the announcement:

The Southwest Seattle Historical Society is delighted to host Michaela Kraft for a live Zoom presentation on Thursday, January 21 at 6:00 PM. Kraft will deliver a presentation and cooking demonstration titled, “Fish For Thought: Fishing Derbies Strengthen Community on Alki and Beyond.” Registration is required.

During the 1940s, fishing competitions had proliferated so quickly that nearly every town along the Sound, as well as numerous businesses and organizations, sponsored one. Though they were widespread, Seattle became the hub for these derbies. We’ll explore a brief history of fishing and these fishing derbies in the Pacific Northwest, and then zoom in on the Alki Fishing Derby and how this tradition brought people together and built a rock-solid sense of community on Alki.

Following the presentation, Kraft will be offering a cooking demonstration of a popular Alki dish that reflects recipes that were likely used around the time of the Derbies.

Michaela Kraft is from Wisconsin, and is a Museology graduate student at the University of Washington. She received her Bachelor’s Degree in Drama and Arts Management from the University of Wisconsin- Stevens Point, and has been fortunate to work at a number of historical societies and historic sites throughout the Midwest. She is passionate about interpretation, and has used her background in the theater to bring the past to life.

For more details and to register, please visit our website at loghousemuseum.org, or contact Maggie Kase, the Programs & Interpretation Coordinator at programs@loghousemuseum.org.

WINNER: Here’s who won Save The Stone Cottage’s second ‘story stone’ contest today

January 16, 2021 4:48 pm
|    Comments Off on WINNER: Here’s who won Save The Stone Cottage’s second ‘story stone’ contest today
 |   Fun stuff to do | West Seattle history

As mentioned in our morning preview, the second contest presented by Save The Stone Cottage happened today – a “find the story stone” contest via clues on Twitter. Above, the winner! The photo and update are from STSC’s Jeff McCord:

West Seattleite Keefe Leung found the second lost Story Stone hidden in the bow of the Sasha Eli boat situated “frozen in time” in Whale Tail Park (north of Alki Elementary) in West Seattle.

Here’s a short video of Keefe telling his story of finding the coveted “Story Stone.”

Keefe can now prize his carved soapstone reward (donated in part by Northwest Art and Frame), as well as a gift certificate to a local restaurant and, of course, bragging rights.

Over the weekend, the organizers of the “Search for the Lost Stone” event will reveal some of the hints riddles hidden within the six “Story Stone” clues. Those answers will be tweeted out to “Save the Stone Cottage” Twitter followers here.

There are still two more “Story Stones” to be found. To learn more about the remaining two stones, and the events surrounding them, at the contest page of the “Save the Stone Cottage” website here.

For those who wish to support the rescue efforts, the donation link and social media connections can be found on the home page of the same website, or directly at the donation page for the “Save the Stone Cottage” GoFundMe Charity page.

If you’ve missed previous coverage – the Stone Cottage is the iconic nearly-a-century-old beach bungalow covered in stones, facing demolition to make way for development unless advocates can move it off its site at 1123 Harbor SW.

The campaign is well past the halfway point in fundraising efforts to “Save the Stone Cottage,” but the need is still great to reach the project’s $110,000 goal by the end of January.

FOLLOWUP: Save The Stone Cottage’s first ‘Story Stones’ winner, plus new dates for next 3 contests

January 10, 2021 10:46 am
|    Comments Off on FOLLOWUP: Save The Stone Cottage’s first ‘Story Stones’ winner, plus new dates for next 3 contests
 |   How to help | West Seattle history | West Seattle news

(WSB file photo)

Ever wonder how many stones cover the historic bungalow at 1123 Harbor SW? Now we know, as the first of four “Finding the Story Stones” events ends, and the others get new start dates. Here’s the announcement from Save The Stone Cottage, the volunteers working to save and relocate the little house:

Congratulations to Tanya Johnson from the Lake Stevens area, the winner of our first event ‘Count the Stones.’ Tanya’s guess was just 274 stones shy of the actual number of stones on the front facade of the Stone Cottage, which is 3,774. Tanya says, “I think it’s magical that you are working to save this cottage.” By completing the “Count The Stones” challenge, Tanya has unlocked the “Story of Eva,” the free spirit who built the Stone Cottage.

‘Count the Stones’ is the first of four events the “Save the Stone Cottage” committee is hosting, a series of educational, entertaining and inspiring events called “Finding the Story Stones,” to raise awareness about the GoFundMe Charities fundraising drive. A total of four fun activities will be held this month, in which individuals, virtual teams of friends, and families with children all can participate. Finding the four “Story Stones” will unlock elements of the unusual stories surrounding the Stone Cottage, Eva Falk, and the early history of Seattle and Alki.

Finding Story Stone #2: ‘Search for the Lost Stone’ launches January 16, 2021. This second contest is a clue-based Twitter search in which clues to the whereabouts of the second Story Stone will be tweeted out over six hours. Finding this Story Stone will unlock stories and secrets about the Stone Cottage itself.

We previewed all the contests a week and a half ago; the third one, “Walking in Eva’s Shoes,” now starts January 23rd, and the “Stone Cottage Karaoke Rock Concert” is set for January 30th. More details are on the this page of the Save The Stone Cottage website, where the newly unlocked “Story of Eva” will be posted this week, along with a photo of the “story stone.” Meantime, the crowdfunding campaign continues here, with $52,440 of the $110,000 needed for the move, as of this morning.

ONLINE: Your next chance to learn about West Seattle’s 20th-century streetcars

(Seattle Municipal Archives photo of what’s described as the Highland Park-Burien line’s Hillside Station – possibly in Riverview – 1915)

Even as our transportation future remains in flux, there are lessons to be learned from our past. Historic Seattle offers you a chance to learn about West Seattle’s streetcar history a century ago, in a free online event two weeks from today (11 am Saturday, January 23rd). Here’s the announcement:

Join us for an exploration of West Seattle’s streetcar history from 1916 to 1940 with Mike Bergman. This virtual lecture will cover the construction of the streetcar system and the many ways in which it influenced West Seattle’s development and growth in the first half of the 20th century.

From an early age, Mike Bergman was interested in Seattle’s transportation history – especially the city’s bridges, railroads, and public transit systems. Mike joined a transit consulting firm shortly after graduating from UW, followed by tenures at, both, King County Metro and Sound Transit. Following his retirement in 2016, Mike has maintained a strong interest in local transit and transportation history. He is a volunteer at the Pacific Northwest Railroad Archive (PNRA) and has organized PNRA’s large collection of material on the Seattle Municipal Railway. He is the president of the Tacoma Chapter- National Railway Historical Society, and regularly contributes articles of local historical interest to The Trainsheet, the chapter’s monthly newsletter.

Although the event is free, registration is required. More information, including the registration link, is here.

Bergman gave a similar presentation back in August for the Southwest Seattle Historical Society.

ENTRY TIME: Here’s the latest on the Southwest Seattle Historical Society’s contest for students

January 9, 2021 10:44 am
|    Comments Off on ENTRY TIME: Here’s the latest on the Southwest Seattle Historical Society’s contest for students
 |   West Seattle history | West Seattle news

We have new information about the Southwest Seattle Historical Society‘s essay contest for young writers, first announced in mid-December. Here’s the update:

The Southwest Seattle Historical Society is pleased to announce that it is now accepting submissions for its first history essay contest in partnership with Paper Boat Booksellers. Submissions will be accepted in English, Spanish, and Vietnamese.

The theme of our competition is WOMEN HISTORY MAKERS OF THE DUWAMISH PENINSULA. We encourage students to write an essay that explores the contributions of a specific woman from the Duwamish Peninsula who has made an historical impact on the community, past or present, famous or not-yet-famous. Tell us how the woman you choose to write about inspires you.

This contest is open to all students. Winners will be selected in each grade category outlined below:

Grades 3-5 – 250 words maximum

Grades 6-8 – 500 words maximum

Grades 9–12 – 750 words maximum

Essays will be judged by a panel of SWSHS staff, volunteers, and community partners based on the following criteria:

-Demonstrated understanding of the woman as a person and the role she has played or is playing in the history of the Duwamish Peninsula

-Effective use of descriptive language.

-Correct punctuation, spelling, and grammar

-For grades 6 and up, appropriate citations in any reference style

To submit an essay for consideration, please visit loghousemuseum.org/blog/essaysubmissions . Submissions should include a cover letter indicating: the title of the essay, the student’s name, grade level, and contact information where the student can be notified of the contest results.

We encourage students to make use of the Historical Society’s archives and historians. Email Maggie, the museum Programs and Interpretation Coordinator at writingcontest@loghousemuseum.org.

Submissions will close on Monday, February 15, 2021 at 5 pm. Winners will receive a special certificate and gift from the Southwest Seattle Historical Society and Paper Boat Booksellers. Winning essays will also be published on the Historical Society’s blog and West Seattle Blog. Best of all, winners will be honored at a special event hosted by the Historical Society and have the opportunity to read their essay at the event!

2020 LOOKBACK: This year’s 10 most-commented WSB stories

What a year! With hours to go until 2021 arrives, it’s time for our annual lookback, with the 10 most-commented WSB stories of the year. As you can probably guess, the pandemic and the West Seattle Bridge closure loom large on the list; those two ongoing emergencies also made this a record year for WSB readership, averaging almost 2 million pageviews a month. Thanks for reading, commenting, sending tips, and huge thanks to the local businesses and organizations whose sponsorships cover our costs (which increase along with traffic, as we work to increase reliability and our server’s ability to handle big breaking news). Now, on to the countdown!

#10 – GOVERNOR EXTENDS STAY-HOME ORDER
May 1, 2020 – 190 comments
Gov. Inslee announced the “Stay Home, Stay Healthy” order would be extended another month, and also outlined his plan for reopening in phases.

#9 – CITY COUNCIL GETS BRIDGE BRIEFING
April 20, 2020 – 195 comments

Four weeks after the West Seattle Bridge was closed, five days after SDOT announced the closure would last until at least 2022, the City Council got a briefing.

#8 – SEATTLE EVENING MARCH COMES TO ALKI AND ADMIRAL
July 30, 2020 – 196 comments

Their demonstrations weren’t the biggest seen in West Seattle, but the Seattle Evening March protesters’ visits here were among the most memorable, as they marched along many residential streets on their way to visit officials including City Councilmembers and, on this night, King County Executive Dow Constantine.

#7 – ‘STAY HEALTHY STREETS’ ADD ALKI POINT
May 7, 2020 – 215 comments

As part of the city’s pandemic response, some streets were closed to through traffic to give people more space to walk, run, and roll. When Beach Drive’s northern end, alongside Constellation Park, was added, many were thrilled, many others were not.

#6 – ALKI POINT ‘STAY HEALTHY STREET’ EXPANDS
May 10, 2020 – 230 comments
Shortly after the aforementioned stretch of Beach Drive was closed to through traffic, it was suggested that adding Alki Avenue west of 63rd would make sense too – and that happened quickly.

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Save The Stone Cottage’s campaign continues with four ‘Finding the Story Stones’ events

(1940s-era photo courtesy Save The Stone Cottage)

As reported here last weekend, Save The Stone Cottage is almost halfway to raising the funding needed to move the iconic beach bungalow off its to-be-redeveloped site, putting it on the path to preservation. Next step: Four events for you! Here’s the announcement:

In a race to beat the wrecking ball, throughout January 2021 the “Save The Stone Cottage” committee is putting on a series of educational, entertaining and inspiring events called “Finding the Story Stones,” to raise awareness about the GoFundMe Charities fundraising drive. Four fun activities will be held over the course of the next 30-day period in which individuals, virtual teams of friends, and families with children all can participate. Finding the four “Story Stones” will unlock elements of the unusual stories surrounding the Stone Cottage, Eva Falk and the early history of Seattle and Alki.

The first of four family-friendly events launches this weekend!

Finding Story Stone #1: ‘Count the Stones’ Begins January 1, 2021

The first contest begins with the onset of the New Year. From January 1st to January 6th you and/or your team can be one of the first to “Count the Stones” on the front façade of the Stone Cottage at 1123 Harbor Ave SW. Participants who correctly guess the number of stones (within a 50-stone range) will earn bragging rights and help unlock the “Story of Eva,” the free spirit who built the Stone Cottage. Submit your team’s name, contact information, and single best guess at: savethestonecottage.org/storystones

Finding Story Stone #2: ‘Search for the Lost Stone’ launches January 9, 2021

This second contest is a clue-based Twitter search in which clues to the whereabouts of the second Story Stone will be tweeted out over six hours. Finding this Story Stone will unlock stories and secrets about the Stone Cottage itself.

Finding Story Stone #3: ‘Walking in Eva’s Shoes’ January 16, 2021

This third contest highlights the story of Eva Falk when, during the early 1930s, she enlisted the help of her children to tow wagon loads of beach stones from the Alki Lighthouse to where the house was being built on Harbor Avenue more than two miles away. Participants will be encouraged to complete the trip from the Alki Lighthouse to the Stone Cottage and symbolically re-enacting the journey of Eva and her children. Finding this third Story Stone will unlock the story of “Building the Stone Cottage.”

Finding Story Stone #4: ‘Stone Cottage Karaoke Rock Concert’ January 23, 2021

We will hold a live “Stone Cottage Karaoke Rock Concert” in which participants can choose from a list of songs to perform. Songs can be performed as an individual or a team. The winning Karaoke performer will receive the final Story Stone and unlock the “Story of the Duwamish.”

You can enter the first contest here starting at midnight tonight; crowdfunding continues here.

FOLLOWUP: Save The Stone Cottage campaign almost halfway to goal

(Photo by Stewart L.)

Two weeks after launching a crowdfunding campaign, Save The Stone Cottage is almost halfway to its fundraising goal. The group of local preservation advocates and volunteers is aiming to raise $110,000 to move the stone-studded beach bungalow off its site at 1123 Harbor SW before a redevelopment project starts construction. As of today, the campaign has passed $47,000. Save The Stone Cottage is working with building-moving experts Nickel Bros to move the century-old structure to a temporary site next month – likely storage at a Port of Seattle site nearby – until a new permanent site is found. More backstory is in our previous coverage here and here; donations are welcome here.

Young writer in the family? Southwest Seattle Historical Society contest!

December 16, 2020 1:52 pm
|    Comments Off on Young writer in the family? Southwest Seattle Historical Society contest!
 |   West Seattle history | West Seattle news

Winter break is almost here. Young writers might consider planning/writing an entry for a new contest that the Southwest Seattle Historical Society is launching. We’re happy to play a small part in it, too. Read on for details in SWSHS’s announcement:

The Southwest Seattle Historical Society is pleased to announce its first history essay contest for students in partnership with Paper Boat Booksellers. The theme of our competition is: WOMEN HISTORY MAKERS OF THE DUWAMISH PENINSULA. We encourage students to write an essay that explores the contributions of a specific woman from the Duwamish Peninsula who has made a historical impact on the community, past or present, famous or not-yet-famous. Tell us how the woman you choose to write about inspires you.

This contest is open to all students. Winners will be selected in each grade category outlined below:

● Grades: 3 – 5 250 words maximum
● Grades: 6 — 8 500 words maximum
● Grades: 9 – 12 750 words maximum

Essays will be judged by a panel of SWSHS staff, volunteers, and community partners based on the following criteria:

● Demonstrated understanding of the woman as a person and the role she has played or is playing in the history of the Duwamish Peninsula
● Effective use of descriptive language.
● Correct punctuation, spelling, and grammar
● For grades 6 and up, appropriate citations in any reference style.

Students should include a cover sheet that outlines: the title of the essay, student’s name, grade level, and an email address or telephone number where the student can be notified of the contest results.

Submissions will open 9:00 am on Monday, January 4, 2021 on our website at www.loghousemuseum.org. We encourage students to make use of the Historical Society’s archives and historians. Email Maggie, the museum Programs and Interpretation Coordinator at writingcontest@loghousemuseum.org.

Winners will receive a special certificate and gift from the Southwest Seattle Historical Society and Paper Boat Booksellers. Winning essays will also be published on the Historical Society’s blog and West Seattle Blog. Winners also will be honored at a special event hosted by the Historical Society and have the opportunity to read their essay at the event!

FOLLOWUP: ‘Save The Stone Cottage’ community campaign launches

(Photo by Stewart L.)

We’ve been reporting for almost two years on advocates’ hopes of saving “Eva’s Stone Cottage,” the little rock-covered house across from Don Armeni Boat Ramp, on a site set for redevelopment. Today, they have launched a community campaign – here’s the announcement:

The stone-studded cottage at 1123 Harbor Ave SW has been a beloved and legendary landmark in West Seattle for 90 years. The wrecking ball is looming and we need help to save this piece of Seattle history.

(Stone Cottage, circa 1940s)

Eva Falk built the cottage in the 1930’s and her children came up with its unique façade of more than 15,000 beach stones. The stones were carried from the beach near the Alki Lighthouse, and each stone was thoughtfully placed by hand on the exterior of the building. Eva told her daughter Carmecita Munoz that “This house is for giving shelter to anybody and anything.” For good reason, one stone placed prominently near the cottage’s front door bears the shape of a heart, welcoming all who entered. Eva passed away in 1997 at age 92.

The Stone Cottage is now surrounded by condos and townhouses and is slated for demolition in January. For more than two years, a group of West Seattle neighbors, Save The Stone Cottage LLC, has joined forces with the Southwest Seattle Historical Society and Historic Seattle, to develop a plan to save the 90-year-old beach home. These community volunteers, working in conjunction with the new property owner, Chainqui Development, have developed a three-phase, adaptive-reuse plan, and have until mid-January 2021 to move the house off the site before the wrecking ball arrives.

The plan involves securing and transporting the structure into temporary storage, siting and selecting its final location, and eventual site placement and structure restoration. Our vision is to preserve the cottage and keep it in the immediate Alki neighborhood, as a place for the community to gather. “Old buildings matter because they tell the story of the city. Once they’re gone, that’s it. You can’t build an old building,” says John Bennett, owner of Bennett Properties and historic-building consultant.

Save The Stone Cottage LLC seeks to raise $110,000 in donations to execute the plan to rescue, relocate, and restore the Stone Cottage. Donations are being accepted through the website www.savethestonecottage.org and a GoFundMe charity account. The Southwest Seattle Historical Society, a tax-exempt 501(c)(3) organization, is serving as the fiscal sponsor of the Save the Stone Cottage Project, and has no operational role in this project.

Save The Stone Cottage plans Friday media briefings at which volunteers will talk more about the plan. (That’s also when they expect to launch the crowdfunding page.)