Search Result for : stone cottage

Beach petition, Stone Cottage’s status @ brief Alki Community Council meeting

With no guests or presentations, the Alki Community Council only convened for about 35 minutes on Thursday night. We have three notes from the in-person-and-online meeting:

(WSB file photo)

ALKI BEACH PETITION: This online petition is not an ACC project, but it voices a sentiment that comes up at many ACC meetings – the need for more Seattle Parks TLC at Alki Beach. It begins: “This is a call to action for our parks department and the city of Seattle to make the necessary repairs and improvements prior to the busy season of Alki Beach Park.” The petition also calls for more education to ensure people are mindful of the wildlife with which they share “this precious piece of paradise,” noting, “This beach is also the home to 200 species of fish, 100 species of sea birds, 26 kinds of marine mammals, and 3,000 species of invertebrates.” If you want to sign it, go here.

(WSB photo, last Saturday)

STONE COTTAGE: The ACC has already donated money to the rescue effort for the beloved bungalow, currently in storage, and now is deciding whether to endorse the idea of permanently siting it between the Alki Bathhouse and Statue of Liberty Plaza, an idea that Save The Stone Cottage is continuing to pursue with Seattle Parks. (We reported on this in our update last weekend.) Attendees decided they weren’t ready to take a vote, though, and are hoping to get a Save The Stone Cottage representative to their next meeting.

WEBSITE: The group also talked briefly about its new website, which currently features a spotlight story about a nonprofit whose volunteers are often seen at Alki, Seal Sitters Marine Mammal Stranding Network. You can see the spotlight here.

NEXT MEETING: The ACC meets at 7 pm on third Thursdays, so that’ll be April 21st, likely also “hybrid” – online as well as in-person at Alki UCC (6115 SW Hinds) – watch alkicommunitycouncil.org for updates.

WEST SEATTLE HISTORY: What’s next for the rescued Stone Cottage?

(WSB photos by Patrick Sand)

By Tracy Record
West Seattle Blog editor

For the first time since its move from a redevelopment site, the Stone Cottage welcomed a crowd of visitors this morning. Historic Seattle is hosting events that spotlight recipients of its Preservation Awards, and the volunteer group that rescued the stone-studded beach bungalow is among them. So this morning – seven months after the specialty moving firm Nickel Bros towed it off its original site – more than three dozen people gathered at the Port of Seattle lot where the century-old house, up on blocks and behind fencing, awaits its future.

Three West Seattleites from Save The Stone Cottage LLC told its story. Entrepreneur John Bennett recapped its history, from how its quirky owner Eva Falk decided to cover it in rocks, to how local advocates first tried to buy it 20 years ago to the recent rescue operation.

Read More

Visit the Stone Cottage at its temporary site with Historic Seattle

In the early 1930s, Eva Falk and her mother Helen foraged thousands of stones from local shores and ‘hired’ unemployed Hooverville stonemasons to attach them to exterior wood walls in exchange for meals. Recently facing demolition, the Stone Cottage was being watched by preservation advocates affiliated with the Southwest Seattle Historical Society. The new owner/developer agreed to give the newly organized grassroots group Save the Stone Cottage, who worked tirelessly to relocate it to a temporary site in August 2021. Save the Stone Cottage also received a $3,000 Community Advocacy prize to fund their ongoing work to find a permanent, publicly accessible home for the building

Join us for a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see the Stone Cottage, on blocks, at its temporary site* in West Seattle and learn more about this ongoing preservation effort from a few leaders of the Save the Stone Cottage movement: John Bennett, Owner of Bennett Properties; Deb Barker, President of Morgan Community Association, and Mike Shaughnessy, Gadget-guy & Junkologist at Georgetown Junk.

Cost: $5 members / $10 general public

(Location to be provided to registrants)

STONE COTTAGE: Visit its temporary site with Historic Seattle next month

(August 18, 2021, reader photo by Rachel)

Heard about this last night at the Alki Community Council meeting and confirmed it today with Historic Seattle: The preservationist group is presenting a visit to the temporary site of the historic Stone Cottage on March 12th, with tickets available now. It’s the first chance for an update since the quirky structure’s move exactly half a year ago. Participants will include some of the local volunteers/advocates who worked for years to save it from facing demolition when its Harbor Avenue site was sold for redevelopment. The event is in-person, in West Seattle, at 11 am Saturday, March 12th, with a small ticket fee that supports Historic Seattle.

Police staffing, new community-advocacy group, Stone Cottage’s future @ Alki Community Council

September means community groups are back on their meeting schedules again, with most still meeting online. Last Thursday night, three topics were in the spotlight as the Alki Community Council resumed its third-Thursday schedule:

POLICE STAFFING: That made up most of what the ACC heard from Southwest Precinct Lt. David Terry. As he’s said in past briefings, they’re understaffed – minimum number of officers at night is supposed to be 9, and that night (Thursday) they were down to 7 – SPD offers OT for officers interested in filling the gap, but more and more are saying no. “So we’re running the shift with shorter numbers, which is crazy” – this weekend they faced the possibility of being down to 6 or 7 on a shift. Lt. Terry summarized, “We’re out of bodies.” In response to an attendee’s questions, Lt. Terry acknowledged that they sometimes have even fewer in West Seattle/South Park because they have to lend officers to a “task force” callout elsewhere in the city, and when that happens – these days, mostly for nightlife safety – the SW Precinct may be down to “4 or 5 officers for 17 square miles.” Attendees mentioned they are disappointed that Seattle Parks returned to regular closing time at Alki this week and asked what SPD thinks about it. Lt. Terry said he couldn’t offer an opinion, just the observation that it would most likely mean “more calls for service.” As for Alki police responses over the summer – there was a “small spike” in June and July but a drop in August. “You’re still the second safest area in all of West Seattle” (after Fauntleroy), he noted.

FRIENDS OF ALKI NEIGHBORHOODS: Quality-of-life concerns – crime among them – have given rise to this new group, FANS for short. Reps formally introduced themselves at the ACC meeting with a presentation. Here’s the new group’s purpose:

“We want to voice our interest as one connected neighborhood … we’re all experiencing the same thing,” said Mollie Means, who led the presentation. What they all have in common: Proximity to Alki Beach Park. Means estimates that 24,000 people comprise the Alki neighborhoods. They’re putting together a survey to identify the key issues they want the city to address. “We want to gather data to support strategic initiatives.” They hope that will lead to change that enhances the experience of residents and visitors alike. This past summer was problematic in multiple ways, she said – first “car caravans” visiting, then the chaotic “kickback” crowd in May, then the June quadruple shooting that left one man dead. “What was really effective is that (after that) Police and Parks worked together to ‘tweak” the way things work at the beach.

Pending survey results, here’s some of what FANS hopes to advocate for:

Read More

PHOTOS/VIDEO: Stone Cottage makes the move (updated)

12:22 AM: The next big chapter in the Stone Cottage‘s history is being written tonight, with the little stone-studded house getting moved off its soon-to-be-redeveloped site at 1123 Harbor Avenue SW. Destination: Port of Seattle land about a mile southeast, until a permanent home is found.

A crowd is here to watch renowned structural movers Nickel Bros take the house to its interim home; we’ll be updating as it goes. (Added: Among those present were family members of Eva Falk, the cottage’s creator.) First, shown above, the truck is moving into position.

1:03 AM: At least another 20 minutes until they start pulling the Stone Cottage off the site – which’ll be tricky, with a power pole close to its east side, a hydrant close to its west side.

1:51 AM: The moving has begun – in short bursts for starters as they carefully maneuver off the site.

2:35 AM: Still maneuvering. Some lines/cables are the newest hurdle to clear. … Ten minutes later, inching around the hydrant.

2:54 AM: Off the site! Now dealing with hydraulics to get under road-spanning wires.

3:06 AM: It’s now rolling down the road.

4 AN: Back at HQ, adding photos and video above. Plus – the next two, sent by Rachel, with a view from over Harbor Avenue as the Stone Cottage rolled by Don Armeni:

And here’s a pic from the pre-move wait – group photo of Save The Stone Cottage volunteers, whose many months of work (along with community support) made this happen:

(They were the ones cheering loudest toward the end of our video clip above.) We’ll be following up to see what’s next.

ADDED WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON: Thanks to Stewart L. for the photo of the Stone Cottage after arrival at its temporary home:

Mike Shaughnessy of Save The Stone Cottage tells WSB that the Stone Cottage reached its interim site at 4:45 am – 15 minutes shy of when their street-use permit expired. “It was touch and go … threading the needle between cars, and we almost got stuck near 7-Eleven.”

And talk about touch and go … hours after the Stone Cottage was gone, the developers who own its former site demolished the remaining structures:

(That photo also is from Stewart L.)

STONE COTTAGE MOVE: Still happening tonight, but without public events

(WSB photo)

2:22 PM: We’ve just learned from members of Save The Stone Cottage that there’s been a change in plan for tonight’s move. It’s still happening – but minus the hoopla: No ceremonial events, no mini-parade, just the move. What happened is that the moving firm, Nickel Bros, had a positive COVID test – and even though the person who tested positive is NOT on the crew that will be handling tonight’s move, “out of an abundance of caution,” Save The Stone Cottage’s Jeff McCord explains, they decided to cancel the public-spectacle part of the plan. The winning bidders in their auction for ceremonial roles in the event, for example, will get refunds. More details to come.

3:06 PM: The full update we’ve since received from Save The Stone Cottage explains, “Nickel Bros contacted the Save the Stone Cottage committee on Monday evening as soon as its COVID case emerged and possible contact exposures within the Nickel Bros crew had been discovered. The company administered rapid tests to its entire crew early this morning. Two Nickel Bros crew members tested positive for COVID and are quarantining.” One more note: “Those interested in seeing the move take place can still do so, but the Save the Stone Cottage committee recommends that they stay inside vehicles and distanced from the moving staff.”

WEST SEATTLE TUESDAY: Stone Cottage moving night & what else is up today/tonight

(Seen in Lincoln Park this morning: ‘Fashion shoot’ is all they’d say)

Here’s what’s happening in the hours ahead, from the WSB West Seattle Event Calendar:

OUTDOOR STORY TIME: Page Ahead and the Seattle Public Library are teaming for an outdoor story time today in the amphitheater at High Point Commons Park (behind 6400 Sylvan Way SW), 11 am-noon.

SIGNWAVING FOR RACIAL JUSTICE: Join Scott at 16th/Holden for now-weekly signwaving to advocate for racial justice, 4:30-6 pm at 16th/Holden. Signs available if you don’t have your own.

WOMEN’S PERSONAL-SAFETY CLASS: 4:30 pm online, free. Our calendar listing has registration infrmation.

TOASTMASTERS: You’re invited to join West Seattle Toastmasters 832 online tonight at 6:30 pm – our calendar listing explains how.

REDISTRICTING: The 2020 Census results will be used to redraw boundaries for legislative and Congressional districts. What do you need to know about how this process will affect your political power? The League of Women Voters is teaming up with the 34th District Democrats for an online presentation/discussion at 7 pm tonight – here’s how to attend.

STONE COTTAGE MOVE: The historic stone-studded house at 1123 Harbor Avenue SW will be moved tonight just after midnight. Spectators welcome! Preps at the site get going at 11 pm. Here’s the plan as announced by Save The Stone Cottage.

Something for our calendar? Best way to get it to us is westseattleblog@gmail.com – thank you!

REMINDER: Stone Cottage to roll down Harbor Avenue late Tuesday night

Another reminder – tomorrow night is when the historic Stone Cottage will be moved off its original site at 1123 Harbor Avenue SW, taken by structural-moving specialists Nickel Bros to a temporary holding site on Port of Seattle land to the east/southeast. Over the weekend, we published the plan for moving night – even if you’re not planning to go watch, be aware of the traffic effects. In case you missed it, here again are the key points, from the group that’s coordinating the move, Save The Stone Cottage:

Approximately 8 p.m.: Nickel Bros’ crew will maneuver the Stone Cottage from wooden cribbing piles onto oversized dollies, and connect them to the semi-truck.

11:30 p.m.: Special remarks by VIP’s at the Information area,

11:55 p.m.: VIP’s lead a countdown, then the ‘Big Go Button’ is pressed by the Save the Stone Cottage auction winner. Lights and fog will erupt from the Stone Cottage.

11:59 p.m.: Drivers and riders enter their convoy vehicles: Nickel Bros Truck Cab, Pilot Car, and Sweeper Car

12:05 a.m.: Nickel Bros truck pulls the Stone Cottage into the Harbor Avenue SW roadway and gets in line between the Pilot Car and the Sweeper Car.

12:15 a.m.: Stone Cottage convoy heads south on Harbor Avenue SW at parade speed – approx 5mph. The rolling convoy may stop to let vehicular traffic from cross street through.

By 1 a.m.: Nickel Bros truck pulls the Stone Cottage through the SW Florida Street gates while the Pilot Car and Sweeper Car turn around and head back to the starting point.

By 2 a.m.: Nickel Bros crew will have the Stone Cottage securely parked onto wooden piers in the Port of Seattle storage lot.

During the move:

No public will be allowed in or near the Nickel Bros Stone Cottage work crew area on the west side of Harbor Ave at Maryland Place.

No public will be allowed within the driving roadway during the move.

The Harbor Avenue SW ‘No-Parking zones’ will ONLY be along Don Armeni Boat Launch and near the Calif. Ave intersection.

SDOT and SPD are responsible for maintaining one-way vehicular flow along eastern side of Harbor Avenue SW during the move. .

Sidewalk closure on the west side 1100 block of Harbor Avenue SW (Stone Cottage block)

Sidewalks along Harbor Avenue SW will provide great elevated viewing opportunities.

SIDE NOTE #1: Save The Stone Cottage, which has led the community campaign to save it, notes that their effort is noted in this summer’s edition of Preservation Magazine, published by the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

SIDE NOTE #2: Never seen a house move before? Here’s our coverage, with video, from a move almost three years ago at a development site just a few blocks from the Stone Cottage.

STONE COTTAGE MOVE: Extra day to bid on being part of it; plus, see the schedule for the big night

(WSB photo)

If you’ve been considering bidding to be part of the historic Stone Cottage‘s move next week (late Tuesday/early Wednesday), you have extra time. The group that’s been working to preserve it, Save The Stone Cottage, has an update. They’ve also announced the timeline for the move. First, the auction reminder:

The stone-studded cottage at 1123 Harbor Ave SW has been a beloved and legendary landmark in West Seattle for 90 years. Threatened with demolition, the Stone Cottage has been saved by the community, and is going to be moved into storage the night of August 17.

The Save the Stone Cottage has extended the bidding deadline of the ‘First Mile’ Auction another 24 hours. This Auction offers fans of the Stone Cottage the opportunity to bid on five separate packages that epitomize moving the Stone Cottage:

Lead the Move — Ride in the Pilot Car
Launch the Convoy — Push The Blast-Off Button
Backseat Driver — Ride in the Moving Rig
Shadow the Convoy — Ride in the Sweeper Car
Wave-in the Convoy — Finish Line Checkered Flag

Prefer sleeping during the midnight move? Consider a ‘Buy The Mile’ per-foot donation for the haul route.

With this extension, the Save the Stone Cottage ‘First Mile’ Auction website will remain open for bids through 4 pm on Sunday, August 15. Highest bid winners will be notified of their status and specific move details beginning at 6 pm Sunday, August 15.

Visit The ‘First Mile’ Auction site to bid and start the fun. The ‘First Mile’ Auction site is hosted by the Southwest Seattle Historical Society and we are grateful for its auction expertise.

Save the Stone Cottage LLC has raised more than $82,000 of the $110,000 donation goal to execute a phased plan to rescue, relocate and restore the Stone Cottage. Donations are still being accepted through the website savethestonecottage.org and a GoFundMe charity account. The Southwest Seattle Historical Society, a tax exempt 501(c)(3) organization, is serving as the fiscal sponsor of the Save the Stone Cottage Project. We appreciate its steadfast participation.

Now, here’s what you need to know if you’re planning on watching Tuesday night – first, the schedule:

Approximately 8 p.m.: Nickel Bros’ crew will maneuver the Stone Cottage from wooden cribbing piles onto oversized dollies, and connect them to the semi-truck.

11:30 p.m.: Special remarks by VIP’s at the Information area,

11:55 p.m.: VIP’s lead a countdown, then the ‘Big Go Button’ is pressed by the Save the Stone Cottage auction winner. Lights and fog will erupt from the Stone Cottage.

11:59 p.m.: Drivers and riders enter their convoy vehicles: Nickel Bros Truck Cab, Pilot Car, and Sweeper Car

12:05 a.m.: Nickel Bros truck pulls the Stone Cottage into the Harbor Avenue SW roadway and gets in line between the Pilot Car and the Sweeper Car.

12:15 a.m.: Stone Cottage convoy heads south on Harbor Avenue SW at parade speed – approx 5mph. The rolling convoy may stop to let vehicular traffic from cross street through.

By 1 a.m.: Nickel Bros truck pulls the Stone Cottage through the SW Florida Street gates while the Pilot Car and Sweeper Car turn around and head back to the starting point.

By 2 a.m.: Nickel Bros crew will have the Stone Cottage securely parked onto wooden piers in the Port of Seattle storage lot.

Some things you need to know regarding the route:

No public will be allowed in or near the Nickel Bros Stone Cottage work crew area on the west side of Harbor Ave at Maryland Place.

No public will be allowed within the driving roadway during the move.

No Parking will be allowed on the east side of Harbor Ave SW between the Don Armeni boat launch entrance and SW Florida Street.

SDOT and SPD are responsible for maintaining one-way vehicular flow along eastern side of Harbor Avenue SW during the move. .

Sidewalks along Harbor Avenue SW will provide great elevated viewing opportunities.

Two and a half years have passed since we first reported on local preservationists’ campaign to save the quirky little house after its site was bought by a developer.

FOLLOWUP: Date set for West Seattle’s Stone Cottage to be moved; here’s how you can do more than watch

(April photo by Mike Shaughnessy of Save the Stone Cottage)

West Seattle’s historic Stone Cottage finally has a moving date – one week from tomorrow. Announced this afternoon by the volunteer preservationists of Save the Stone Cottage:

The moving date is SET! The historic Stone Cottage is about to embark on its First Mile road trip, and the Save the Stone Cottage team is celebrating this big step with an online auction complete with once-in-a-lifetime opportunities.

The stone-studded cottage has been a beloved and legendary landmark in West Seattle for 90 years. Threatened with demolition, the Stone Cottage has been saved by the community, and is going to be moved into secure storage at the Port of Seattle just a mile south of its 1123 Harbor Ave SW location. This ‘First Mile’ move will be on the evening of Tuesday, Aug. 17, 2021, starting after 11 p.m. and going until approximately 2 a.m. Wednesday, Aug. 18. All are invited to watch the convoy from the Harbor Avenue SW sidewalk.

Leading up to the move, you can participate in the ‘First Mile’ Auction where fans of the Stone Cottage have the opportunity to bid on five separate packages that epitomize moving the Stone Cottage:

Lead the Move — Ride in the Pilot Car

Launch the Convoy — Push The Blast-Off Button

Backseat Driver — Ride in the Moving Rig

Shadow the Convoy — Ride in the Sweeper Car

Wave-in the Convoy — Finish Line Checkered Flag

Prefer something less high profile? Consider a ‘Buy The Mile’ per-foot donation for the haul route.

The Save the Stone Cottage ‘First Mile’ Auction website is open for bids from 10 a.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 10, 2021, through 4 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 14, 2021. Highest bid winners will be notified of their status and specific move details beginning at noon Sunday, Aug. 15, 2021.

Visit The ‘First Mile’ Auction site to bid and start the fun. The ‘First Mile’ Auction site is hosted by the Southwest Seattle Historical Society and we are grateful for its auction expertise.

Save the Stone Cottage LLC has raised more than $82,000 of the $110,000 donation goal to execute a phased plan to rescue, relocate and restore the Stone Cottage. Donations are still being accepted through the website www.savethestonecottage.org and a GoFundMe charity account. The Southwest Seattle Historical Society, a tax exempt 501(c)(3) organization, is serving as the fiscal sponsor of the Save the Stone Cottage Project. We appreciate its steadfast participation.

Special ‘First Mile’ Thanks to the Southwest Seattle Historical Society, Nickel Brothers, Chainqui Development, All City Fence, Bennett Properties, Port of Seattle, Seattle Department of Transportation and Northwest Insurance Group.

It’s been four months since the Stone Cottage was jacked up in preparation for the move. Save the Stone Cottage’s Jeff McCord tells us it’s still in good shape, and that jacking it up early was actually beneficial, protecting it from potential risks such as vandalism. As for why the long delay, he said permits took longer than expected. As for what happens after the move – the next step is to find a permanent new home.

VIDEO: Stone Cottage – up, up, but not yet away

TUESDAY: Thanks to Mike Shaughnessy of Save The Stone Cottage for the photo! As previewed here Sunday night, the structural-moving firm Nickel Bros has been at the historic stone-studded bungalow for two days, jacking it up to get ready to take it to its interim site. The date for the move isn’t set yet – it will have to happen in the middle of the night, since the process tends to involve some road-blocking. Save The Stone Cottage volunteers, meantime, continues crowdfunding for the next phase of saving the quirky piece of Alki Beach housing history – finding a permanent site, relocating it there, and restoring it. (Its current site at 1123 Harbor SW will soon be redeveloped.)

WEDNESDAY MORNING: Mike just sent the link to this video showing how the process proceeded:

FOLLOWUP: Next phase of Stone Cottage moving preps about to start

(January photo by Mark Jaroslaw)

The date for the big move isn’t finalized yet but over the next few days, if you happen to go by 1123 Harbor Avenue SW, you’ll see intensified preparations for getting the historic Stone Cottage on the road to its future. Deb Barker from the volunteer coalition Save The Stone Cottage tells WSB that structural-move specialists Nickel Bros will be back on site starting tomorrow. After some work such as caulking, they’ll be jacking up the stone-studded bungalow to get it on the piers that will support it for the move. As announced three weeks ago, Save The Stone Cottage has raised enough to ensure the move can be made, taking it to an interim site for storage until a permanent location is found. Crowdfunding continues so the Stone Cottage can then be restored.

‘The Stone Cottage will be saved!’ Volunteers plan first mile of historic house’s journey

(Stone Cottage, circa 1940s)

Two years after we first reported on local preservationists’ hopes of saving the “Stone Cottage,” they’ve reached the first milestone – announcing today that it will be saved and moved before its longtime site is redeveloped:

We are excited to announce the Stone Cottage will be saved! Over 360 donors have contributed more than $66,000, which is enough to save and move the Stone Cottage from its current site and into secure storage a mile south of its 1123 Harbor Ave SW location. The “First Mile” of its journey will occur in the middle of the night once city permits are issued, most likely on a weekend in April. House-moving expert Nickel Bros is waiting for permits before they set the move date.

For Nickel Bros, house moving is an elaborate and inexact process. It involves science, skill and dollies that look like 747 landing gear. Save the Stone Cottage team member Jeff McCord worked for Nickel Bros for many years and narrates the steps that may be involved when the Stone Cottage is moved off its site and travels down Harbor Avenue. Read, see photos and watch videos here:

The First Mile — “An Insider’s Story about How to Move a House”

We are all looking forward to the First Mile of the journey this Spring. The Save the Stone Cottage team will celebrate the First Mile move and continue to raise funds with an online auction featuring once-in-a-lifetime opportunities. During the First Mile Auction, fans of the Stone Cottage have the opportunity to bid on fun packages that epitomize moving the Stone Cottage, as well as have the ability to support the First Mile move by making a ‘Buy The Mile’ per-foot donation for the haul route. The ‘First Mile’ Auction will occur in advance of the house move, so be sure to check our website for updates.

Save The Stone Cottage LLC will continue to work hard to raise $110,000 in donations to execute the plan to rescue, relocate and restore the Stone Cottage. Donations are being accepted through the website savethestonecottage.org and a GoFundMe charity account. The Southwest Seattle Historical Society, a tax-exempt 501(c)(3) organization, is serving as the fiscal sponsor of the Save the Stone Cottage Project. We appreciate its steadfast participation.

Save The Stone Cottage launched the crowdfunding campaign in December. The house, covered in stones carted to the site from Alki Beach, is ~90 years old.

FOLLOWUP: Checking in on the Stone Cottage

March 10, 2021 7:02 pm
|    Comments Off on FOLLOWUP: Checking in on the Stone Cottage
 |   How to help | West Seattle history | West Seattle news

(January photo by Mark Jaroslaw)

From the “in case you wondered too” file: We received a question about what’s up with the Stone Cottage, the little old stone-studded bungalow awaiting its move off the to-be-redeveloped corner parcel at 1123 Harbor SW. So we asked Save the Stone Cottage, whose Jeff McCord tells WSB there’s no official date yet for the move, but they’re expecting news “soon.” The crowdfunding campaign continues, too – they’re about 55 percent of the way to the $110,000 goal for the first phase of moving and storing the Stone Cottage while a permanent new home is found.

STONE COTTAGE: ‘Story Stones’ events wrap up as move looms

February 15, 2021 9:34 pm
|    Comments Off on STONE COTTAGE: ‘Story Stones’ events wrap up as move looms
 |   How to help | West Seattle history | West Seattle news

The community campaign to Save The Stone Cottage continues. Tonight, two notes – first, the results of the final “Story Stones” competition. If you missed the karaoke-style concert/trivia event last Friday night, here’s the first 15 minutes:

At about 6:40 in, you’ll see the first singers, Lora and Steve from the West Seattle Junction Association – then in the final minute, 14 minutes in, Caspar Babypants‘ guest performance. Everyone who showed up for the event on Zoom had the chance to answer trivia questions related to the songs. Winners were Dan and Joanie Jacobs, who get a gift certificate to a West Seattle restaurant and the coveted fourth and final “Story Stone.” Guest performers also included reps from local businesses both musical (including WSB sponsors Thunder Road Guitars and The Bass Shop, and of course Easy Street Records) and not (Husky Deli, Beveridge Place Pub, Salty’s [WSB sponsor], and more). Now, an update on the plan to move the Stone Cottage before its longtime home at 1123 Harbor Avenue SW gets redeveloped:

(January photo by Mark Jaroslaw)

Jeff McCord from Save The Stone Cottage tells WSB, “We don’t know an exact move date due to the developer’s permitting still being underway. We will of course announce more details as we learn them, but we believe it may not occur until sometime in March (or possibly later) at this point.” They’re still actively crowdfunding to pay for the move and a temporary home for the historic stone-studded structure.

ADDED TUESDAY: See the entire concert/music-trivia event here.

TONIGHT: Save The Stone Cottage invites you to the Karaoke Rock Concert & Music Trivia Competition

February 12, 2021 9:31 am
|    Comments Off on TONIGHT: Save The Stone Cottage invites you to the Karaoke Rock Concert & Music Trivia Competition
 |   Fun stuff to do | West Seattle history | West Seattle news | WS culture/arts

(Stone Cottage, circa 1940s)

As moving day nears for the historic Stone Cottage, the volunteers working to save it are inviting you to the last of four “Finding the Story Stones” events – live online tonight, the family-friendly Karaoke Rock Concert & Music Trivia Competition. Some of the singing’s already handled:

In the photo, Save The Stone Cottage committee member Mike Shaughnessy recorded Steve Theile and Lora Radford of the West Seattle Junction Association singing the Steve Miller Band‘s “Rock’n Me” in the middle of Walk All Ways.

They’re among the local business owners and special guests – including Chris Ballew (Caspar Babypants) and Blaine Cook (Zippy’s Giant Burgers and rocker) and more! It’s an interactive event that will allow you to join in the fun and compete for prizes; the :winner” of the fourth and final Story Stone will unlock the “Story of the Duwamish.”

It’s happening on Zoom at 7 pm tonight if you want to participate in trivia; if not, you can also just view here.

P.S. Crowdfunding for the Stone Cottage’s move to its new temporary home continues here.

FINALE: Rock out during 4th event in series presented by Save The Stone Cottage

(Photo by Stewart L.)

As preparations continue to move the Stone Cottage off its to-be-redeveloped site at 1123 Harbor SW, the volunteer preservationists working to save it have one more event ahead – here’s their update:

In a race to beat the wrecking ball, throughout January 2021 the “Save The Stone Cottage” committee has put on a series of educational, entertaining, and inspiring events called “Finding the Story Stones,” to raise awareness about our fundraising drive.

Finding each of the “Story Stones” has been unlocking elements of the unusual stories surrounding the Stone Cottage, Eva Falk, and the early history of Seattle and Alki. The final of these four fun activities will be held on February 12, capping off the series of fun events.

Finding Story Stone #4: “Karaoke Rock Concert”
February 12, 2021 at 7 pm

The Karaoke Rock Concert is the last of the four “Finding The Story Stones” events produced by The “Save the Stone Cottage” Committee, and is a musical-themed, family-friendly event. Originally scheduled for the end of January to coincide with the moving of the Stone Cottage, this event is being held in February as the Stone Cottage is in its final stages of preparation for the move, which is expected to be in mid-February.

The “Karaoke Rock Concert’ will include music, music trivia and will feature some special guest appearances. This interactive event will allow viewers and participants to join in the fun and compete for prizes! The ‘winner’ of the fourth and final Story Stone will unlock the “Story of the Duwamish.”

Event date and time: Friday, February 12, 2021; 7 pm
Location: Online Zoom viewing event; participants will submit their guesses and answers on Twitter.
Details: Anyone can join, view and participate.

So far three of the four “Story Stones” have been claimed. In early January, Tanya Johnson guessed the number of stones on the front façade of the Stone Cottage within 274 stones of the actual number, unlocking the first Story Stone. Then, Keefe Leung solved a series of six rhyming clues that led him to discover the second Story Stone hidden in the bow of the Sasha Eli, an aluminum “dory,” or boat, ‘frozen in time’ at the Whale Tail playground adjacent to Alki Elementary. And, finally, last weekend Beata Stensager completed “Walking in Eva’s Shoes,” having trekked all the way from the Alki Lighthouse to the Stone Cottage and visiting the five interpretive stops along the way. Beata was able to answer all five questions correctly to win the third Story Stone and a gift certificate to a local restaurant.

Save The Stone Cottage continues crowdfunding to cover the cost of moving the structure and storing it until a permanent new home is found.

STONE COTTAGE: Moving preparations continue, as you’re invited to ‘Walk in Eva’s Shoes’ this Saturday

Thanks to Mark Jaroslaw for the photo. Structure-moving specialists Nickel Bros were back at the Stone Cottage (1123 Harbor SW) to continue preparing to move the rock-covered bungalow off its site before the property’s new owners start their redevelopment project. The preservation advocates who formed Save The Stone Cottage continue crowdfunding to pay for the move, and are also continuing a series of community events to keep it top of mind. Next one is this weekend – here’s the announcement:

Saturday, January 23, 2021: “Walking in Eva’s Shoes” event on Alki, starting at the Lighthouse, 10 am to 2 pm.

Looking for fun family-friendly activities to do outside with the whole crew? Experience “Walking in Eva’s Shoes,” the third event hosted by the “Save the Stone Cottage” committee in the “Finding the Lost Stones” contest series.

Does it seem like ages that you’ve been ‘bubbled up at home’ with little ones, with not much to do? Here’s an opportunity for some fun family time on a familiar shoreline path but instead you get to ‘see’ Alki of the 1930s through the eyes of a Seattle family as they collected stones to cover their home.

That little house on Harbor Ave SW known as Eva’s Stone Cottage is now the focus of the “Save the Stone Cottage” committee’s fundraising drive. We plan to move the house out of the way of pending demolition and give it a new life.To raise awareness of these efforts, we’re hosting a series of educational, entertaining, and inspiring events called “Finding the Story Stones.” These four “Story Stones” unlock elements of the unusual stories surrounding the Stone Cottage, Eva Falk, and the early history of Seattle & Alki.

Now is the chance for you and your family to relive history by “Walking in Eva’s Shoes” from the Alki Lighthouse to the Stone Cottage, symbolically recreating the 1930’s journey that Eva Falk and her family took. Along the way, there are five interpretive stops where a history volunteer will tell the fascinating stories behind some remarkable locations we have right here in our own backyard on Alki, the Birthplace of Seattle.

● The Alki Lighthouse (3201 Alki Avenue SW – start your journey here)
● The Birthplace of Seattle Monument
● The Log House Museum
● Anchor Park (former location of Luna Park amusement park)
● and the Stone Cottage itself.

This event will take place from 10 am to 2 pm on Saturday, January 23, 2021. It is open to anyone, and meant to be accessible. Participants are encouraged to walk the beautiful route, although those who may be less mobile can bike, scooter, skate or drive if they wish to. At each of the interpretive stops along the way the historical interpretive volunteers will tell a short story on each of the historical landmarks. For example:

*Anchor Park at Duwamish Head is the former 12-acre amusement park known as Luna Park. Opening in 1907, the rides operated until 1913, and the pool closed after a 1931 fire. Built on pilings over the water, Luna Park extended over Elliott Bay and was called the ‘greatest Amusement Park on the West Coast.” Today, during very low tides, one can spot remnants of the park pilings that offer a glimpse into an exciting past.

(DID SOMEONE SAY PUZZLES??) For those who also wish to compete for the third Story Stone, a gift certificate at a local West Seattle restaurant (for takeout or outdoor seating), and bragging rights, you can solve the five puzzles along your route and be the first to correctly answer all five puzzle answers once you arrive at the last stop at Stone Cottage. Although there is only one who will achieve the honor of unlocking the Story Stone, all who participate will be “winners” because of the fun and educational experience they’ll have during this event.

So far two of the four “Story Stones” have been claimed.

The fourth event will be a live “Stone Cottage Karaoke Rock Concert” on January 30th. Find out more at Save The Stone Cottage’s website; if you’re interested in donating to the moving fund, go here.

WINNER: Here’s who won Save The Stone Cottage’s second ‘story stone’ contest today

January 16, 2021 4:48 pm
|    Comments Off on WINNER: Here’s who won Save The Stone Cottage’s second ‘story stone’ contest today
 |   Fun stuff to do | West Seattle history

As mentioned in our morning preview, the second contest presented by Save The Stone Cottage happened today – a “find the story stone” contest via clues on Twitter. Above, the winner! The photo and update are from STSC’s Jeff McCord:

West Seattleite Keefe Leung found the second lost Story Stone hidden in the bow of the Sasha Eli boat situated “frozen in time” in Whale Tail Park (north of Alki Elementary) in West Seattle.

Here’s a short video of Keefe telling his story of finding the coveted “Story Stone.”

Keefe can now prize his carved soapstone reward (donated in part by Northwest Art and Frame), as well as a gift certificate to a local restaurant and, of course, bragging rights.

Over the weekend, the organizers of the “Search for the Lost Stone” event will reveal some of the hints riddles hidden within the six “Story Stone” clues. Those answers will be tweeted out to “Save the Stone Cottage” Twitter followers here.

There are still two more “Story Stones” to be found. To learn more about the remaining two stones, and the events surrounding them, at the contest page of the “Save the Stone Cottage” website here.

For those who wish to support the rescue efforts, the donation link and social media connections can be found on the home page of the same website, or directly at the donation page for the “Save the Stone Cottage” GoFundMe Charity page.

If you’ve missed previous coverage – the Stone Cottage is the iconic nearly-a-century-old beach bungalow covered in stones, facing demolition to make way for development unless advocates can move it off its site at 1123 Harbor SW.

The campaign is well past the halfway point in fundraising efforts to “Save the Stone Cottage,” but the need is still great to reach the project’s $110,000 goal by the end of January.

FOLLOWUP: Save The Stone Cottage’s first ‘Story Stones’ winner, plus new dates for next 3 contests

January 10, 2021 10:46 am
|    Comments Off on FOLLOWUP: Save The Stone Cottage’s first ‘Story Stones’ winner, plus new dates for next 3 contests
 |   How to help | West Seattle history | West Seattle news

(WSB file photo)

Ever wonder how many stones cover the historic bungalow at 1123 Harbor SW? Now we know, as the first of four “Finding the Story Stones” events ends, and the others get new start dates. Here’s the announcement from Save The Stone Cottage, the volunteers working to save and relocate the little house:

Congratulations to Tanya Johnson from the Lake Stevens area, the winner of our first event ‘Count the Stones.’ Tanya’s guess was just 274 stones shy of the actual number of stones on the front facade of the Stone Cottage, which is 3,774. Tanya says, “I think it’s magical that you are working to save this cottage.” By completing the “Count The Stones” challenge, Tanya has unlocked the “Story of Eva,” the free spirit who built the Stone Cottage.

‘Count the Stones’ is the first of four events the “Save the Stone Cottage” committee is hosting, a series of educational, entertaining and inspiring events called “Finding the Story Stones,” to raise awareness about the GoFundMe Charities fundraising drive. A total of four fun activities will be held this month, in which individuals, virtual teams of friends, and families with children all can participate. Finding the four “Story Stones” will unlock elements of the unusual stories surrounding the Stone Cottage, Eva Falk, and the early history of Seattle and Alki.

Finding Story Stone #2: ‘Search for the Lost Stone’ launches January 16, 2021. This second contest is a clue-based Twitter search in which clues to the whereabouts of the second Story Stone will be tweeted out over six hours. Finding this Story Stone will unlock stories and secrets about the Stone Cottage itself.

We previewed all the contests a week and a half ago; the third one, “Walking in Eva’s Shoes,” now starts January 23rd, and the “Stone Cottage Karaoke Rock Concert” is set for January 30th. More details are on the this page of the Save The Stone Cottage website, where the newly unlocked “Story of Eva” will be posted this week, along with a photo of the “story stone.” Meantime, the crowdfunding campaign continues here, with $52,440 of the $110,000 needed for the move, as of this morning.

Save The Stone Cottage’s campaign continues with four ‘Finding the Story Stones’ events

(1940s-era photo courtesy Save The Stone Cottage)

As reported here last weekend, Save The Stone Cottage is almost halfway to raising the funding needed to move the iconic beach bungalow off its to-be-redeveloped site, putting it on the path to preservation. Next step: Four events for you! Here’s the announcement:

In a race to beat the wrecking ball, throughout January 2021 the “Save The Stone Cottage” committee is putting on a series of educational, entertaining and inspiring events called “Finding the Story Stones,” to raise awareness about the GoFundMe Charities fundraising drive. Four fun activities will be held over the course of the next 30-day period in which individuals, virtual teams of friends, and families with children all can participate. Finding the four “Story Stones” will unlock elements of the unusual stories surrounding the Stone Cottage, Eva Falk and the early history of Seattle and Alki.

The first of four family-friendly events launches this weekend!

Finding Story Stone #1: ‘Count the Stones’ Begins January 1, 2021

The first contest begins with the onset of the New Year. From January 1st to January 6th you and/or your team can be one of the first to “Count the Stones” on the front façade of the Stone Cottage at 1123 Harbor Ave SW. Participants who correctly guess the number of stones (within a 50-stone range) will earn bragging rights and help unlock the “Story of Eva,” the free spirit who built the Stone Cottage. Submit your team’s name, contact information, and single best guess at: savethestonecottage.org/storystones

Finding Story Stone #2: ‘Search for the Lost Stone’ launches January 9, 2021

This second contest is a clue-based Twitter search in which clues to the whereabouts of the second Story Stone will be tweeted out over six hours. Finding this Story Stone will unlock stories and secrets about the Stone Cottage itself.

Finding Story Stone #3: ‘Walking in Eva’s Shoes’ January 16, 2021

This third contest highlights the story of Eva Falk when, during the early 1930s, she enlisted the help of her children to tow wagon loads of beach stones from the Alki Lighthouse to where the house was being built on Harbor Avenue more than two miles away. Participants will be encouraged to complete the trip from the Alki Lighthouse to the Stone Cottage and symbolically re-enacting the journey of Eva and her children. Finding this third Story Stone will unlock the story of “Building the Stone Cottage.”

Finding Story Stone #4: ‘Stone Cottage Karaoke Rock Concert’ January 23, 2021

We will hold a live “Stone Cottage Karaoke Rock Concert” in which participants can choose from a list of songs to perform. Songs can be performed as an individual or a team. The winning Karaoke performer will receive the final Story Stone and unlock the “Story of the Duwamish.”

You can enter the first contest here starting at midnight tonight; crowdfunding continues here.

FOLLOWUP: Save The Stone Cottage campaign almost halfway to goal

(Photo by Stewart L.)

Two weeks after launching a crowdfunding campaign, Save The Stone Cottage is almost halfway to its fundraising goal. The group of local preservation advocates and volunteers is aiming to raise $110,000 to move the stone-studded beach bungalow off its site at 1123 Harbor SW before a redevelopment project starts construction. As of today, the campaign has passed $47,000. Save The Stone Cottage is working with building-moving experts Nickel Bros to move the century-old structure to a temporary site next month – likely storage at a Port of Seattle site nearby – until a new permanent site is found. More backstory is in our previous coverage here and here; donations are welcome here.