Search Result for : speed cushions

FOLLOWUP: Here’s where SDOT plans 10 new speed cushions/humps in Alki area

Since the Alki-area public-safety meeting convened by District 1 City Councilmember Rob Saka last month (WSB coverage here), we’ve been asking SDOT about where specifically they’re planning speed cushions and other traffic calming, as promised at the meeting. They told us last week they were still working on it. Then Councilmember Saka said at this afternoon’s City Council briefing meeting that he would have an announcement later in the day – and it’s just in, with this SDOT map:

Here’s the SDOT elaboration that Saka included:

We now have a final design, and work scheduled, for the concrete speed cushion installations on Harbor, Alki and 56th Ave SW.  The map shows the speed hump locations and it is at 90% design. Taking a design from 90-100% is essentially completed in the field.

The work orders are all [in] and field layout is tentatively scheduled … with the actual construction beginning July 29. “Field layout” means people will see temporary markings outlining the locations of the speed cushions, while construction itself shouldn’t take more than 2-3 days.

NOTE: To avoid confusion, speed cushions, humps, and bumps are often used interchangeably. However, speed cushions are done with cut-outs on non-arterial streets which are generally more narrow so to allow for fire truck access. The speed ‘humps’ are more shallow than speed ‘bumps’ to allow for fire truck access but steep enough to slow vehicles down on the arterial streets.

The speed cushion implementation is essentially a Phase 1 of potential improvements. SDOT will also be looking at narrowing the roadway outside the Duwamish Head area, where the lane width is already relatively narrow, and this work will be done likely in September.

The angle parking at Duwamish Head, however, will stay the same for now, though nearby residents have asked for it either to be blocked off or converted to parallel parking. Saka’s announcement continues:

As a longer-term option, SDOT may look at some outreach on alternative options for reconfiguring the Duwamish Head parking.  My understanding is that SDOT have significant concerns with reconfiguring the Duwamish Head parking as it would actually create significant more space in the right of way for aggressive driving/passing of vehicles.  At the very least, SDOT believes that a parking reconfiguration would require some significant outreach as the impacts could also exacerbate parking concerns in the broader neighborhood.

Here’s the official construction notice circulating to people in the area.

FOLLOWUP: Genesee Hill speed cushions installed, day before school starts

Thanks to Greg for the tip. The three sets of speed bumps announced earlier this year for SW Genesee, near Genesee Hill Elementary, were installed today, the day before the scheduled start of Seattle Public Schools‘ 2023-2024 classes. Other West Seattle school areas with new traffic-safety installations over the summer include Lafayette Elementary, Pathfinder K-8, and the Denny/Sealth campus.

FOLLOWUP: Speed-bump installation near Sealth/Denny campus

6:06 PM: Three and a half weeks after we reported
speed humps/cushions were on the way to SW Thistle and other streets around the Sealth/Denny campus, installation has begun. We noticed the fresh asphalt protrusions while headed eastbound on Thistle a bit earlier. It appeared the eastbound installation was further along than the westbound side.

8:11 PM: Going back the other way, we were able to see that the sets on Thistle are complete. We weren’t able to check 27th, 25th, or Kenyon.

West Seattle’s next new speed humps

While traveling on SW Thistle between 35th and Delridge this week, we noticed three sets of markings that appeared to outline future speed humps. So we asked SDOT whether this was a continuation of the Westwood-area work that so far has included a new four-way stop at 25th/Trenton. Spokesperson Ethan Bergerson says this is specifically tied to safety for Chief Sealth International High School and Denny International Middle School, and that the markings we saw on SW Thistle won’t be the only ones added – they’re planning four on Thistle as well as others on 26th, 27th, and Kenyon, as shown on this map:

That’s from Denny_ChiefSealth_TrafficCalming_Postcard (002) (2) that Bergerson says SDOT sent to residents nearby. As it notes, the ones for SW Thistle are actually speed cushions – the difference is explained as “Speed cushions are like speed humps but have breaks that allow emergency vehicles to pass through them without slowing down.” No installation timeline yet.

Stalled speed bumps revived, West Seattle Bridge Community Task Force told. (UPDATE – where and when)

ORIGINAL THURSDAY NIGHT REPORT: The full report on tonight’s West Seattle Bridge Community Task Force meeting is yet to come – late tonight or tomorrow – but one note was worth breaking out, lest it get lost amid the bridge updates: Sara Zora from the Reconnect West Seattle program said the Fire Department has signed off on some speed bumps that were on hold because of emergency-response concerns. So they’ll go ahead with the installation at spots on 106th, 18th, 45th, Cloverdale, and Marine View Drive. Specific locations weren’t recapped; we’ll be following up on that tomorrow.

ADDED FRIDAY AFTERNOON: SDOT’s response to our followup inquiry:

Speed cushions are anticipated to be installed in March in the following five locations:

– (1) SW 106th St between 35th and 41st Ave SW

– (1) 18th Ave SW between SW Myrtle and Graham St

– (3) 45th Ave SW between SW Trenton St and SW Director St

– (1) SW Cloverdale St between 11th Ave SW and 12th Ave SW

– (2) Marine View Dr between 44th Ave SW and SW 106th St

This is eight speed cushions in total.

Speed-hump building has begun, and other updates @ HPAC’s second meeting of spring

(WSB photo, SW Barton west of 9th SW)

By Tracy Record
West Seattle Blog editor

New speed humps are popping up all over Highland Park, South Delridge, and Riverview. SDOT is building up to six a day, and sent reps to HPAC‘s monthly meeting to talk about Home Zone progress and other Reconnect West Seattle projects meant to tackle bridge-detour cut-through traffic.

SDOT’s Sara Zora and David Burgesser began by announcing the RWS project dashboard – centered on a map – has been updated.

A quarterly report is now out, too – here are the key points:

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29 new speed humps on the way to Arbor Heights

That map shows where SDOT is planning speed humps to slow drivers near Arbor Heights Elementary and Westside School (WSB sponsor). We contacted SDOT for more details after a postcard landed in Arbor Heights mailboxes and reader Andrew forwarded it as an FYI. The map (here’s a PDF version) shows 29 speed humps planned for streets that already have 20 mph school-zone signage, says SDOT spokesperson Ethan Bergerson. He adds that this is part of the Safe Routes to School program. Construction isn’t scheduled yet, he says, but won’t happen any earlier than May; the mailer was meant to be an early warning of sorts.

ADDED WEDNESDAY: SDOT explains the color-coding as – red for speed humps, blue for speed cushions. Here’s an explanation of how they differ.

West Seattle traffic: 48th SW speed bumps close to installation

12:25 PM: The 48th Avenue SW straightaway through Seaview toward Genesee is about to get bumpier – on purpose. SDOT confirms that the four sets of speed bumps – one per block between SW Graham and SW Brandon – are scheduled to be installed today, in the places where the road was recently painted (as shown in our Tuesday photo above) to show their planned placement. According to SDOT’s Rick Sheridan, “There will be a total of 16 cushions installed – four from curb to curb on each of the four blocks. The speed cushions are designed to calm traffic while still allowing buses and emergency vehicles to maneuver without difficulty. We plan to carry out the installation today, however, the department is still awaiting the delivery of materials needed for the work.”

5:21 PM UPDATE: Went back to 48th SW to check:

We found an SDOT crew working on part of the road, but it looked like repairs, not installation. Maybe tomorrow.

VIDEO: Promises made, concerns voiced at Alki/Harbor community-safety meeting, four days after deadly shooting

(WSB video and photos)
By Tracy Record
West Seattle Blog editor

The Alki-area community advocates who co-hosted tonight’s public-safety meeting with District 1 City Councilmember Rob Saka have long been pushing for as much action against street disorder as the city can muster. Last weekend’s shootings at Duwamish Head were just the latest flashpoint.

Perhaps that’s why the first actions promised tonight by city reps – but, they insisted, not the last – had to do with street design: Lane-narrowing and more speed cushions are on the way, per SDOT managers. The action most requested by attendees, installing speed cameras, isn’t so easy, panelists explained. Same with the matter of “holding people accountable.”

Above is our video from the nearly-two-hour meeting inside the sanctuary at Alki UCC; below, our recap:

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911 explained, crime stats detailed, ‘natural drainage’ project updates, more at HPAC’s first 2024 meeting

January 25, 2024 12:28 pm
|    Comments Off on 911 explained, crime stats detailed, ‘natural drainage’ project updates, more at HPAC’s first 2024 meeting
 |   Delridge | Highland Park | Neighborhoods | West Seattle news

By Tracy Record
West Seattle Blog editor

Another in-person meeting last night began the 2024 calendar for HPAC, the community coalition for Highland Park, Riverview, and South Delridge. They’re testing various locations since their longtime meeting quarters at Highland Park Improvement Club remain out of commission, so last night’s meeting was held at Southwest Library, which meant an earlier start and fixed cutoff time, since the branch clears meeting rooms 15 minutes before 8 pm closing time.

Nonetheless, the 1 1/4-hour meeting facilitated by HPAC co-chair Kay Kirkpatrick delivered plenty of information. Here’s how it unfolded:

SEATTLE POLICE: The Southwest Precinct team that’s appeared at multiple recent community meetings, Lt. Josh Ziemer and community liaison Officer German Barreto, were asked about the shooting death at Southwest Pool/Teen Life Center on Tuesday, but said they could not divulge any updates. In crime stats, so far this year, Highland Park had three assaults, 6 motor-vehicle-related thefts (car prowls, etc.), 7 motor-vehicle thefts and attempted thefts, including “one restolen from a tow lot,” 1 aggravated assault, 1 attempted burglary, 1 store robbery, 1 residential burglary. 2 larceny (one attempted mail theft and one mail theft). Year to year, 2023 compared to 2022, homicides, aggravated assaults up, motor vehicle thefts up, burglaries down.

For South Delridge, also in HPAC’s coverage area – so far this year 2 assaults, one motor vehicle theft, one hit-run, one business burglary, one robbery (phone snatch) – robberies are down year to year, thefts down, except for vehicle thefts, which are up.

Asked about the 1st/Cloverdale encampment just off the sharp turn west of Highway 509:

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Here’s what police and the City Attorney said about crime/safety @ Admiral Neighborhood Association

By Tracy Record
West Seattle Blog editor

As community organizations resume regular meeting schedules for fall, the Admiral Neighborhood Association had public safety high on the agenda last night.

The meeting at Admiral Church, facilitated by ANA president Joanie Jacobs, had two major guests – the Southwest Precinct‘s new third-watch commander, and City Attorney Ann Davison.

POLICE: Lt. Joe Hadley now oversees the 7 pm to 5 am shift (“third watch”) and said he most recently worked with the Office of Police Accountability. He said they’re bringing back the Community Police Team (an officer with that assignment accompanied him). Lt. Hadley opened the floor quickly to Q&A.

First question: How’s the staffing? “It’s rough,” he replied. The goal remains to hire about 100 officers a year “but I don’t thin we’re going to make that this year.” The 4/10 schedule change has made SPD more attractive for “laterals” – trained officers coming from other police departments. “Our previous schedule was horrible” (four days on, two days off). “The chief has made it a priority to improve morale, improve retention, entic(e) folks to come work here.” The recent consent-decree announcement isn’t going to change anything short-term, he said.

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TRAFFIC, TRANSIT, WEATHER: Welcome to Thursday

August 10, 2023 6:02 am
|    Comments Off on TRAFFIC, TRANSIT, WEATHER: Welcome to Thursday
 |   West Seattle news | West Seattle traffic alerts

6:02 AM: Good morning! It’s Thursday, August 10th.

WEATHER & SUNRISE/SUNSET TIMES

Mostly sunny, high in the mid-70s. Today’s sunrise was at 5:58 am; sunset will be at 8:30 pm.

NEW SPEED CUSHIONS

On SW Thistle near Chief Sealth International High School.

TRANSIT TODAY

Metro – regular schedule – check here for advisories.

Water Taxi – regular schedule.

Washington State Ferries – 2-boat service. Check Vessel Watch to see where the boats are.

SPOTLIGHT TRAFFIC CAMERAS

Delridge cameras: Besides the one below (Delridge/Henderson), cameras are also up at Delridge/Genesee, Delridge/Juneau, Delridge/Orchard, and Delridge/Oregon.

High Bridge – the main camera:

High Bridge – the view from its southwest end (when SDOT points the 35th/Avalon/Fauntleroy camera that way):

Low Bridge – east-end vicinity:

1st Ave. S. Bridge – alternate route across the river:

Highway 99: – northbound side at Lander.

MORE TRAFFIC CAMS: See all working traffic cams citywide here, most with video options; West Seattle and vicinity-relevant cameras are on this WSB page.

BRIDGE INFO: The @SDOTBridges Twitter feed shows whether the city’s movable bridges are opening for vessel traffic.

If you see trouble on the bridges/streets/paths/bay, please text or call us (when you can do it safely, and after you’ve reported to authorities). Thank you!

TRAFFIC, TRANSIT, WEATHER: Wednesday notes

August 9, 2023 6:03 am
|    Comments Off on TRAFFIC, TRANSIT, WEATHER: Wednesday notes
 |   West Seattle news | West Seattle traffic alerts

6:03 AM: Good morning! It’s Wednesday, August 9th.

WEATHER & SUNRISE/SUNSET TIMES

Mostly cloudy, rain likely this morning, high in the mid-70s. Today’s sunrise was at 5:57 am; sunset will be at 8:32 pm.

(Monday night at Lincoln Park – photo by Theresa Arbow-O’Connor)

NEW SPEED CUSHIONS

On SW Thistle near Chief Sealth International High School.

TRANSIT TODAY

Metro – regular schedule – check here for advisories.

Water Taxi – regular schedule.

Washington State Ferries – 2-boat service. Check Vessel Watch to see where the boats are.

SPOTLIGHT TRAFFIC CAMERAS

Delridge cameras: Besides the one below (Delridge/Henderson), cameras are also up at Delridge/Genesee, Delridge/Juneau, Delridge/Orchard, and Delridge/Oregon.

High Bridge – the main camera:

High Bridge – the view from its southwest end (when SDOT points the 35th/Avalon/Fauntleroy camera that way):

Low Bridge – east-end vicinity:

1st Ave. S. Bridge – alternate route across the river:

Highway 99: – northbound side at Lander.

MORE TRAFFIC CAMS: See all working traffic cams citywide here, most with video options; West Seattle and vicinity-relevant cameras are on this WSB page.

BRIDGE INFO: The @SDOTBridges Twitter feed shows whether the city’s movable bridges are opening for vessel traffic.

If you see trouble on the bridges/streets/paths/bay, please text or call us (when you can do it safely, and after you’ve reported to authorities). Thank you!

TRAFFIC CALMING: Here’s what’s planned for two more school zones in West Seattle

While we await responses from SDOT among others regarding the status of more traffic calming on Alki in the wake of last night’s high-speed crash, we have news of what’s ahead for two more school zones. We received this information after our inquiry last week about speed humps/cushions coming to the Chief Sealth International High School/Denny International Middle School area (here’s that story). While researching that inquiry for us, SDOT spokesperson Ethan Bergerson also found, and told us about, plans for new stop signs by Pathfinder K-8 and new speed cushions by Genesee Hill Elementary – here are maps:

These will be installed before summer’s out; SDOT says mailers have been sent to nearby residents, and they’ll see signage before installation: “Neighbors should look for ‘no parking’ signs at least 3 days before construction, which usually takes 1 day to add stop signs or 2 days to add speed cushions.” (Again, this info came in after a request days before the Alki crash, so it’s not related, and we’ll have that followup whenever the response comes in.)

Talking traffic, crime, leadership @ Admiral Neighborhood Association

By Tracy Record
West Seattle Blog editor

The Admiral Neighborhood Association‘s every-other-month meeting tonight featured reps from two city departments that handle the bulk of the most contentious community issues, SDOT and SPD – not to give presentations, but to answer questions on whatever attendees wanted to talk about.

The meeting was facilitated by ANA vice president Joanie Jacobs (who’s rising to president as a result of tonight’s elections – more on that later) at Admiral UCC Church.

SOUTHWEST PRECINCT POLICE: Lt. Mike Watson opened by asking if anyone had any questions. Jacobs said she knew multiple businesses had experienced burglaries, including an Admiral restaurant just a few days ago. What can they do? “Look out for each other,” he said, for starters. Camera video is helpful. So are signs such as “this area is being video-monitored.” He noted he was asked at a past meeting about catalytic-converter thefts, so he brought that stat – 2,120 citywide so far this year – West Seattle is averaging 40 or 50 a month. They can be sold for up to $350. Toyota Prius, Honda CR-V, Lexus RX-400, Honda Element are all popular targets. Don’t try to confront a thief – people have lost their lives doing that – call 911. Someone else brought up street racing, and neighbors who don’t have valid license plates. Street racing should be reported, Watson said, because there’s a regional task force working on it. Then another person asked about expired tabs. Watson mentioned they’re not allowed to pull people over for them. But a parking-enforcement officer can cite a parked car for expired plates/tabs. What about the double shooting on Alki? The victims both survived, but no one’s been arrested. From the SPD dashboard, he cited some West Seattle stats – robberies are up 18%, aggravated assault up 12%, motor-vehicle theft up 43%, 105 shots-fired incidents so far this year. Cars are usually stolen to commit other crimes, he noted. Despite all that, “West Seattle is the safest part of the city – by far. … You can feel safe here.” (He attributes that in part to strong block watches.) One last question: How’s police staffing? “Down 450-500,” he said. One attendee thanked Lt. Watson for excellent service from officers who responded when he was in a car crash recently.

SDOT: Introduced as being there on a “fact-finding mission” was Matt Beaulieu, there to listen to questions. He was accompanied by Danielle Friedman from the Department of Neighborhoods. First issue, trying to cross Admiral’s south side. There are no crosswalks for several blocks south of the business district, residents pointed out. A resident near the Admiral Way Viewpoint totem pole mentioned crashes from speeding drivers, An SDOT traffic study was mentioned as having found 40 as the “average” speed in the area – “so that means 5,000 drivers are going 60.” The resident who mentioned it has long agitated for traffic calming there. Another attendee brought up the graph of survivability at various speeds. Another attendee talked about the crossing at 47th/Admiral having been installed after a deadly crash, but not getting heeded because “it’s in an odd spot.” What about speed cameras? Some recent laws might loosen up the current restrictions on school zones only, “Photo enforcement is a powerful tool, but you install it and hope it fails” because people stop speeding, Beaulieu said. Friedman mentioned that the recent study of West Marginal Way, blocking off a southbound lane to simulate the conditions during the future protected bike lane, really resulted in slower driving.

What does it take to get something installed? Most of it is based on collision history, when they decide where to spend money, Beaulieu said. So for starters, make sure crashes get reported to police, because otherwise SDOT has no data to refer to. He also noted that they’re studying the best way to deal with arterials. And be sure to contact SDOT directly – maybe they can’t help initially, but your problem will at least be on their radar.

Another question: Aren’t traffic deaths up since Vision Zero began? Beaulieu acknowledged, “We are not trending to zero.” Isn’t it making things worse? The attendee had worked on a school safety committee and requested a four-way stop but said SDOT was resistant – yet now there are new 4-ways and crosswalks by West Seattle High School and Madison Middle School. Aa for VZ in general, Beaulieu mentioned one of the first actions new SDOT director Greg Spotts had decreed – a “top to bottom” review of the program, in hopes of figuring out why it’s not working.

Another resident near 39th/Hanford, close to a new crosswalk, noted that the intersection has numerous crashes each year, some taking out utility poles. Can you put speed cushions on arterials? That’s an “evolving practice” too, said Beaulieu.

Also mentioned – gratitude to SDOT for repaving much of California north of Admiral. (Though there was some puzzlement on why one particular block was skipped.)

ELECTIONS: The meeting ended with a chance to nominate and vote on leadership for net year. Elected to lead ANA in 2023 (and shown left to right in photo above):
President Joanie Jacobs
Vice President Stephanie Jordan
Secretary Carrie McCann
Treasurer Bridgett Markillie

They were the only nominees, and were elected in unanimous approval of the slate.

(Board members, committee leads, and an adopt-a-street coordinator are other roles in the ANA, and they’d love to have more community participation.) Voting was open to members, who pay a $25 annual fee to belong.

P.S. ANA has a business membership program too – $50/year – and plans to more actively promote local businesses. Businesses are donating $25 gift cards for a raffle at ANA meetings, and Mission Cantina donated one for tonight – the winner was drawn before meeting’s end.

EVENTS: This Saturday, Admiral Church is hosting a Christmas Market (as featured in our calendar and West Seattle Holiday Guide). West Seattle Grounds (which Jacobs manages) has launched a toy drive – that will be in our Holiday Guide shortly – and donors get a discount. She also mentioned the Festival of Trees gala at Brookdale Admiral Heights.

SUMMER CONCERTS: After missing three years for the pandemic and venue unavailability, the 2023 concert series will happen one way or another, either Hiawatha if it’s available by summer, or Hamilton Viewpoint. “Our goal this year is that IT WILL HAPPEN,” Jacobs vowed.

NEXT MEETING: ANA is having general meetings every other month, so the next one is likely on the second Tuesday in January, which will be January 10, 7 pm at Admiral Church (4320 SW Hill). Watch connecttoadmiral.org for updates.

Vision Zero 7+ years later, connecting local bicycle riders, more @ May’s West Seattle Transportation Coalition meeting

By Tracy Record
West Seattle Blog editor

Though the “zero” in Vision Zero is not yet in sight, the program’s coordinator remains hopeful.

Her presentation led off this month’s meeting of the West Seattle Transportation Coalition, which also spotlighted a local bicycling group, and ended with some decisions about WSTC’s future.

VISION ZERO: Seven and a half years have passed since Vision Zero, envisioning an elimination of traffic deaths and serious injuries by 2030, was announced. The program’s coordinator for SDOT, Allison Schwartz, was the meeting’s first guest, accompanied by SDOT’s mobility manager Sara Zora. Schwartz noted that this presentation is similar to the update she gave to the Pedestrian Advisory Board two weeks earlier. Again here, she somberly noted the 10 people killed in traffic incidents – on foot (including two West Seattle deaths), on bikes, in cars – in Seattle so far this year.

But they’re undaunted in efforts to reverse the trend: “Vision Zero is more than a slogan … it requires a paradigm shift … prioritizing the movement of human beings” rather than prioritizing vehicles, she said. To do that would take “decades of undoing” what led to this point, she said. Here’s how the program hopes to get to a safer place:

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3 highlights from Fauntleroy Community Association’s February meeting

We “arrived” late because the Sound Transit Community Advisory Group meeting ran long, but here are three toplines from three-quarters of the Fauntleroy Community Association‘s February meeting on Tuesday night:

TRAFFIC CALMING: They’re still working with SDOT on trouble spots (many of which were spotlighted at last October’s special community meeting). Today, in fact, they got the news that the Seattle Fire Department has signed off on three speed cushions on 45th SW between SW Trenton and SW Director (plus others in other neighborhoods, as reported here).

EGG HUNT: Again this year, the FCA plans to hide non-perishable eggs around the community. This is set for the week of April 11th. Bins will be set up for later dropoff of the eggs so they can be reused/recycled. Other details are still in the works – watch here and fauntleroy.net for the official announcement.

ANNUAL MEETING: FCA is hoping that its annual membership meeting can be held in person this year. March – the usual month pre-pandemic – was deemed too soon, but they’re tentatively looking at setting a date in May.

The Fauntleroy Community Association board meets second Tuesdays, 7 pm, online, always open to community members – info here.

New Southwest Precinct commander, neighborhood updates @ District 1 Community Network

The District 1 Community Network‘s monthly online meeting last night included many quick updates as well as a brief chance to meet the Southwest Precinct‘s new commander:

CAPT. MARTIN RIVERA: SPD’s new Southwest Precinct commander is on the job (as reported here) and sat in on last night’s D1CN meeting to start getting acquainted with community groups. Capt. Rivera explained that he was previously the night-duty captain, which means responding to any major nighttime incident in the city. Before then, he worked at the West Precinct – which includes downtown – and served in a variety of other roles in his 22 years with SPD. He was promoted to captain last year, according to his bio on the precinct website (which is the source of the photo at right).

The D1CN meeting, facilitated this month by Marty Westerman of the West Seattle Transportation Coalition and Fauntleroy Community Association, also featured an update from the gondola advocates of West Seattle SkyLink and a variety of quick neighborhood notes:

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What SDOT heard at HPAC discussion. of Delridge/Highland Park ‘Stay Healthy Streets’ future, and your chance to comment today

By Tracy Record
West Seattle Blog editor

SDOT has proposed a permanent route for the Delridge/Highland Park “Stay Healthy Streets,” with some current blocks to be dropped – but keeping the stretch that’s been the source of the loudest community concerns. They’re nonetheless asking for opinions, and hosting an outdoor “open house” today on 11th SW by Highland Park Elementary, 2-4 pm. In advance of that, SDOT reps were at Wednesday night’s HPAC meeting to talk about the Stay Healthy Streets as well as traffic-mitigation/calming events elsewhere.

STAY HEALTHY STREETS: first, a little backstory. These streets are closed to through-traffic, open to drivers who live, work, study, or otherwise have business on them, and open to people walking/running/riding/rolling in the street. The city launched the SHS concept early in the pandemic as a way to get around with more social distancing, but has expanded the mission beyond the pandemic, and is now making many of them permanent. The Delridge-Highland Park SHS network (designated in May of last year) would be the second in the city (after Greenwood) to be made permanent, SDOT’s Madison Linkenmeyer told HPAC.

She recapped what they’ve heard from the community:

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WEST SEATTLE TRANSPORTATION COALITION: Bridge catchup, light-rail lookahead, 16th SW slowdown hopes

By Tracy Record
West Seattle Blog editor

This month’s West Seattle Transportation Coalition meeting provided an opportunity to catch up on some of our area’s biggest projects.

WEST SEATTLE BRIDGE & VICINITY: Two guests from SDOT were there. Danielle Friedman recapped key points from the Community Task Force‘s most-recent meeting (WSB coverage here) – repair work starting this fall (she said “October or November”), Reconnect West Seattle projects continuing including the West Marginal/Highland Park Way intersection and temporary signal at Duwamish Longhouse “starting any minute now” (but that too will be primarily weekend work, she said).

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FOLLOWUP: See what’s in the final ‘Home Zone’ plans for Highland Park, Riverview, South Delridge

By Tracy Record
West Seattle Blog editor

More than 70 locations for speed humps/cushions are part of the final plans for “Home Zone” traffic-calming in Highland Park, Riverview, and South Delridge neighborhoods besieged by detouring drivers since the West Seattle Bridge closed a year ago.

The plans were presented last night – along with side notes about a new stretch of greenway and the bridge itself – at an online meeting led by SDOT and Department of Neighborhoods reps.

THE PLANS: First, the definition of Home Zone:

SDOT did traffic counts at more than 39 locations and took three walking tours while coming up with the draft plan presented in January. They also offered a survey that brought 542 responses. 59 percent of respondents felt the draft plan was missing something that would make them feel safer – 300 suggestions came in. “About 30 percent were things we can accommodate in the Home Zone plan or look into further,” said SDOT’s David Burgesser. The rest were too general, not feasible, too expensive, or put aside for future consideration.

SOUTH AREA HOME ZONE PLAN

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FOLLOWUP: SDOT’s options for future of Alki Point ‘Keep Moving Street’

(WSB photo, Beach Drive “Keep Moving Street” in May)

Also from West Seattle/South Park City Councilmember Lisa Herbold‘s weekly update, new information on options SDOT is considering for the future of what’s currently a “Keep Moving Street” on both sides of Alki Point. Three weeks ago, SDOT announced those sections of Beach Drive and Alki Avenue would keep their no-through-traffic status at least until King County moved to Stage 3 of COVID-19 recovery. Nearby residents have been collecting petition signatures in support of making it permanent, as Herbold notes in her update, saying she “support(s) the continued efforts of constituents advocating for a permanent Stay Healthy Street.” She says she contacted SDOT with questions about the status and in reply, the department told her five options are under consideration:

1. Return to previous street operation

2. Convert to a neighborhood greenway, changes would include:
-Stop signs at intersecting streets will be added where they currently operate as neighborhood yield intersections (64th Ave SW, Point Pl SW, 64th Pl SW, 64th Ave SW)
-Additional traffic calming so that spacing of speed humps and raised crosswalks is approximately every 300 feet
-Approximately 3-4 speed humps or speed cushions would be added.
-Connectivity to the citywide bicycle network would be enhanced through the addition of sharrow pavement markings and wayfinding signs.

3. Upgrade to a permanent Stay Healthy Street, changes would include:
-All of the neighborhood greenway enhancements listed above
-Street Closed and Stay Healthy Street signs at every intersection with durable materials

4. Upgrade neighborhood greenway with additional space for walking adjacent to beachside curb.
-All of the neighborhood greenway enhancements listed above
-Removal of parking and delineation (tuff curb and post) of additional space for walking adjacent to the existing sidewalk adjacent to the beach
-Increased space for walking would be adjacent to park beach only, not continuous where buildings are between roadway and beach.

5. Convert street to operate as one-way northbound for vehicles, providing shared walking and biking space adjacent to beachside sidewalk
-Delineation of a continuous shared walking and biking space adjacent to the existing beachside curb (8’ to 15’ wide)
-Continuous shared walking and biking space would connect from the existing Alki Trail to the end of the Alki Point Keep Moving Street.
-Adjustment of the roadway to operate as one way northbound for vehicles, preserving parking primarily adjacent to east/south curbs.

Herbold says SDOT assured her the street’s status wouldn’t change “until the community engagement process concludes and there is a final determination regarding a permanent configuration.” There’s no elaboration on exactly what the “community engagement process” entails, but the Stay Healthy/Keep Moving Streets project webpage has a contact email: StayHealthyStreets@seattle.gov.

FOLLOWUP: Highland Park traffic-calming, round 1, almost done

Even as the Reconnect West Seattle feedback process continues, Highland Park already has had some traffic-calming measures in the works. Last week, Cindy sent us a photo of a sign that’s already installed and waiting along 9th SW – though the speed bumps it mentions aren’t in place yet:

We checked with SDOT on the installation status, and they sent us the map above, saying, “We have completed installing all of the traffic calming measures everywhere except 9th Ave SW, which we are still working to schedule.” As noted on the map, the 9th SW installations are planned as “speed cushions” – here’s the difference, as explained by SDOT:

Speed humps are designed to slow traffic speeds on low volume, low speed streets. They are a solid hump across the travel lane and are installed near streetlights where they will be visible to people driving and biking.

Speed cushions are typically installed where average speeds are 5 mph higher than the speed limit. Speed cushions leave space for emergency vehicles to pass through quickly and are used on designated fire and emergency routes on residential streets.

This project also included the Highland Park Way/Holden traffic signal that was rush-installed right after the West Seattle Bridge closure, after local residents had worked for years to get safety upgrades at that intersection.

P.S. If you live/work/travel through the area, be sure to give your feedback on the neighborhood-specific list of more potential projects, before July 31st.