BIKE SHARE: It’s back in Seattle, with JUMP returning under new ownership

(May photo by Jeff Collehour)

After almost two months – with some stored near Jack Block Park (photo above) – bike-share bicycles are returning to service. Here’s the announcement we received:

JUMP bikes are returning to Seattle to help residents and visitors travel more safely via an open-air, socially-distant option. Seattle is the 2nd city in the world where Lime is relaunching JUMP bikes.

In early May, Lime acquired JUMP, which then pulled its bikes from Seattle streets at the time as a result of the deal to integrate the systems operationally. Lime will now redeploy the bikes, and they will continue to be available through the Uber app. The fleet size will start at around 500 e-bikes and grow based upon demand. Pricing is $1 to unlock and 36 cents per minute thereafter. Starting today, JUMP rentals will only be available in the Uber app. JUMP bikes will be added to the Lime app at a later date as a result of ongoing systems integration.

We know the ongoing COVID crisis has made it difficult for folks to get around. Metro ridership has dropped 72%, with very limited capacity on buses due to social distancing protocols. But we know people still have a need for transportation. With the return of bike share service to Seattle, more residents will be able to make critical errands and get to work in a pollution-free and congestion-reducing manner as King County moves to Phase II of COVID recovery.

We have a message out to ask if any of those initial 500 bikes are being placed in West Seattle. Let us know if you see them!

10 Replies to "BIKE SHARE: It's back in Seattle, with JUMP returning under new ownership"

  • sgs June 22, 2020 (2:45 pm)

    Fabulous.  Jump e-bikes were .25/minute a couple of months ago when I was checking them out to see if they would be an alternative.  The new price of  $.36/minute seems steep to me.   Not sure how Lime figures out it’s pricing or what the average e-bike trip is, but if it’s going to cost me almost $20 to ride downtown (assuming bike lanes will be a bit congested once everyone moves to bikes), it’s not affordable.   Yes, I know e-bikes are expensive pieces of equipment.

    • beanie June 22, 2020 (4:29 pm)

      I’m not positive, but I always assumed based on their pricing they were trying to be uber alternatives – targeting riders only going short distances that can get congested by traffic. If you’re thinking about e-bikes for commuting, it would probably be a lot more cost-effective to purchase a bike.

      • sgs June 23, 2020 (7:32 am)

        Good point.  Hadn’t thought of the uber alternative perspective.   Probably should purchase…

  • Lola June 22, 2020 (4:12 pm)

    My son just had Alki Bike and Board Retro Fit to an E-Bike for him by looking online and finding a good used bike for what he needed.  He has been riding it now for a couple of weeks and loves it.  He even picks up his GF little girl from Daycare and she rides home with him and loves it.  He did say one day as he crossed the Spokane street bridge he stayed up on the sidewalk as there are turning cars everywhere on the other side.  He said a policeman who was there to ticket drivers trying to use the lower bridge indicated that he needed to be in the Street in the Green Painted Box they have for the bikes to wait for the light to turn green.  He hesitantly obliged since he had the little girl on the back and he did not want to get hit.  

  • Jonah June 22, 2020 (4:44 pm)

    Petrie dishes on wheel’s. Multiple riders with hands that have been where??? Bikes parked everywhere-blocking sidewalk’s, bike lanes, basically anywhere that’s in the way. Does the city care??? NAH!!  

    • mark June 23, 2020 (10:11 am)

      Yes. To go for an hour ride would cost $22.60 and many will leave them wherever convenient (easy) just as they have in the past on sidewalks and the trail having no consideration for others use whether old, kids or disabled.  Here on Alki with the warm weather upon us,  they will continue to be an urban blight on the already crowded trail during the pandemic and no foreseeable enforcement. Having the bridges out may be a blessing in disguise. Does anyone know how much of that money goes to to city coffers?

  • Alex June 22, 2020 (5:54 pm)

    I wish the city would explain the protocols for parking the bikes in a residential neighborhood with sidewalks and parking strips too narrow to accommodate a bike without impeding the public and private right away,   Bikes are also not allowed to be parked on grass which is an issue for a neighborhood but not so much downtown.    Last year the City talked about building bike corrals but has anyone see them in West Seattle?  If you ride one of these bikes to your home, where is it supposed to be parked?   Bikes have been  thrown on the beach and the upper trails in Lincoln Park.  They are left on sidewalks and on private property.   I like transportation options too, but there has to be a better way for dealing with the parking issue.  

  • StopSellingTheSidewalks June 23, 2020 (12:36 am)

    Store ‘em all on the Healthy Streets. 🙄

  • anonyme June 23, 2020 (6:50 am)

    Terrible idea, back for an encore.  I’ve had to dodge these MF’s in multiple locations in West Seattle, which is difficult for someone with mobility issues.  The bikes do not emerge unscathed in these instances.  This is private use of public sidewalks without any kind of sensible plan or implementation and represents a public safety hazard.  They definitely should not be allowed anywhere in the Junction as the sidewalks are already so crowded with junk that it’s difficult to walk in many places.

  • newnative June 23, 2020 (8:57 am)

    I subscribed to the Pronto and thought it was an affordable alternative to owning a bike. Especially since my partner won’t allow me to store a bike indoors and I have had two bikes stolen here. These options are less affordable and I don’t see how they can be considered viable transit alternatives. I won’t be using the Uber app for anything so…

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