SEATTLE SQUEEZE: West Seattle now part of JUMP bikeshare service area

As of today, with days to go until the Highway 99 closure (starting at 10 pm Friday) kicks off the Seattle Squeeze, second bikeshare option is available in West Seattle. The fluorescent-red e-bikes of JUMP have started popping up, joining the green Lime bikes. We noticed them in several areas including Junction Plaza Park, where we photographed by the one above, shortly after JUMP’s parent company Uber sent the announcement that the local service area has expanded to add West Seattle. JUMP bikes have been available in some other parts of the city since November. The expansion announcement notes that “Seattle is one of the first cities to receive JUMP’s next generation bikes, which feature integrated cable locks and a QR code unlocking mechanism.” The company says it’s waiving its $1 unlock fees through February 15th, and that it also has a special price plan for lower-income riders. Today’s expansion also added South Seattle and parts of Queen Anne and Magnolia, Montlake, along with more of the University District. The entire city will be in the service area within “the coming months,” the announcement says.

14 Replies to "SEATTLE SQUEEZE: West Seattle now part of JUMP bikeshare service area"

  • Delridger January 7, 2019 (7:22 pm)

    Great news!

  • dsa January 7, 2019 (9:02 pm)

    How do these companies keep the batteries charged?  Do they swap them out in place or what?  And if so how do they know when is the cost effective time to fo it?

    • Mike January 8, 2019 (6:26 am)

      There’s three that I pass by daily on Capitol Hill.  They have not moved in two weeks.  Maybe the battery is dead, I dunno.

      • Mark Dierking January 8, 2019 (8:38 am)

        This is not great news. The picture shown here is a great example of many paying bicycle  users on the beach where the self-centered inconsiderate one time rider leaves it parked in the way of any pedestrian that wanted to use the public right-of-way for its intended purpose. It is a sidewalk, duh. I have been riding a bike for many many and use  it for commuting, errands, exercise, pleasure, etc.  and always consider parking when dismounting and if it will be in the way of anyone trying to pass in any weather or if there is a better out-of-the-way place. Alki Beach Trail is a prime example of this blight and the unthinking people that use them and leave them wherever they dismount without a thought for a person walking,  running,   with baby stroller, old, disabled,  or wheelchair bound individual. Yet, here there is no accountability for the user, corporate  owner, or the city of seattle that allows an unlimited number of these problems to pop-up.  It has been said that one is either part of the problem or part of the solution. Who are the parents of these people, what did they teach them? Personal responsibility, it seems, in society generally  now is disappearing and not even an afterthought and unless there is a negative financial outcome, one can do as they please. Have at it, be j erk and post a selfie of it because it makes you feel better. Better yet, rent one of these downtown, go for a ride to beautiful Alki on a busy spring, summer or fall sunny day, leave it in the way for everyone else and txt for an uber to take you home. Yeah, that’s it. 

        • Hallucinating Complaint January 8, 2019 (9:43 am)

          Mark Dierking must are referring to a different photo, as he claims it is a ‘great example’ of leaving the bike parked in the way of any pedestrian…Please re-read the photo Mark.  It clearly  shows the bike parked close to the pavement edge just clear of the garden landscaping.  It is parked parallel to the sidewalk and not blocking pedestrians. 

          • Mark January 8, 2019 (11:06 am)

            I could have sworn that it parked on the sidewalk. You obviously are in denial.

          • WSB January 8, 2019 (11:27 am)

            Actually, it’s in the park, not on the sidewalk. I photographed it yesterday afternoon – from two sides, out the car window, as we were headed from one story interview to another – and chose the photo with the best view of the bike itself, not thinking anyone would be squabbling over where the bike was parked. But since a disagreement has arisen – here’s the other angle showing that it’s beyond the sidewalk’s edge:
            https://westseattleblog.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/IMG_7938.jpg

  • Graciano January 8, 2019 (5:06 am)

    Great more bikes to clutter the sidewalks in Seattle. Don’t get me wrong I applaud people who ride their bikes every where and I own 2 myself but I do not leave them laying on sidewalks across town.

    • Azimuth January 8, 2019 (10:50 am)

      It appears a public education and messaging program by the city and bike companies needs to be implemented. If one exists, it’s not working.

  • momosmom January 8, 2019 (11:25 am)

    The City is making money off of these bike so it doesn’t matter if you like them or not they are here to stay as long as there’s money coming in.

    • S in West Seattle January 8, 2019 (12:46 pm)

      They are only here as long as we let them. We as Seattleites have a say how the city is ran and all we need to do is push the issue. 

  • Bruce Barnett January 8, 2019 (10:54 pm)

    Does that mean they won’t charge the $25 fee for outside the central zone: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/transportation/uber-charging-25-to-use-its-shareable-bikes-outside-of-central-seattle-bike-zone/?

    • WSB January 8, 2019 (10:57 pm)

      I asked the company spokesperson that, as I’d read about the controversy before they announced the area expansion. The news release announcing the expansion included the paragraph “In order to encourage riders to leave bikes inside the service area, JUMP provides notice in-app and on its website of a $25 fee for locking the bike outside the system area or bike zone. Although JUMP has issued warnings, no Seattle customers have been charged the $25 fee for ending trips outside the initial service area.”

      So, no $25 fee for anyone here, then, I asked. His reply: “As for the out of service area fee, we still haven’t charged it to anyone in Seattle.”

  • Oakley34 January 9, 2019 (12:09 am)

    If I was rolling out a new bikeshare and wanted to see it become adopted by the community and actually succeed I would not choose rainy/winter season to do it.

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