Admiral Neighborhood Association: From noise to Hubs to HALA and beyond

By Linda Ball
Reporting for West Seattle Blog

The Admiral Neighborhood Association‘s last meeting of 2017 on Tuesday night brought a number of issues to the table.

Election of officers for the new year included president Larry Wymer and treasurer Carrie McCann continuing in their respective roles, but the vice-president and secretary positions remain available until the next meeting, or until someone comes forward to volunteer.

From noise to Hubs to HALA, here’s what else happened:

SURVEY FOLLOWUP: As promised, Newell Aldrich, legislative assistant to City Councilmember Lisa Herbold, came to address the upshot of the Alki Public Safety and Health Survey, which was open for seven weeks earlier this year.

As witnessed every summer, Alki Beach is a regional destination, unique in that people from all over Seattle come to hit the beach, see and be seen, especially on sunny days. What’s different from other similar areas of the city is that people actually live and work near this beach, unlike for example, Golden Gardens.

With 1,100 people responding to the survey, noise from modified vehicle exhaust systems was identified as the number one concern, followed by distracted drivers, speeding, noise from sound systems, unmuffled engine compression brakes (especially near the West Seattle Bridge), cruising, vehicle tire noise, excessive idling, non-visible front and rear license plates, and tinted windows, the latter two making it difficult to identify offenders.

Aldrich said that there was some increased SPD staffing at Alki this summer, but only the chief of police can allocate more officers to an area in the long run. Some of these issues are difficult to enforce, he said, but the city plans to talk to the Sheriff’s Office, the State Patrol, and other agencies to see how they enforce excessive noise. Assigning traffic-enforcement officers could be a challenge, but might be possible, he said.

Then there is the possibility of technology that detects excessive noise, similar to catching speeders. The bottom line is that it’s all tied into the city budget, he said. A provision in the new budget directs SPD to study all this and report back to Herbold’s office by March 16, 2018, in advance of the warm weather season, before things get rowdy again.

HALA UPZONING APPEAL: Deb Barker of the Morgan Community Association visited to talk about the appeal to the Housing Affordability and Livability Agenda (HALA) Mandatory Housing Affordability upzoning Final Environmental Impact Report, filed by a coalition of more than two dozen groups from around the city, three from West Seattle, including MoCA (the Admiral group is not participating).

The goal of the appeal, Barker said, is for the Hearing Examiner to send the FEIS back for further work. Barker said the proposed upzoning is not in step with what the coalition is looking for. Further, the group feels that HALA MHA suggests a one-size-fits-all solution for urban villages around the city. As an example, Morgan currently has some older affordable apartment buildings, but the upzoning could lead to redevelopment, making them no longer affordable. With MHA allowing developers/builders the option of paying a fee for affordable housing separate from their projects, she said, that does not guarantee the money related to West Seattle projects would provide WS affordable housing. It could go anywhere, which accomplishes nothing for keeping neighborhoods intact, in critics’ view.

“The FEIS had lots of information, but not the quality you’d expect when dealing with something this large,” Barker said. As reported here earlier today, hours after the ANA meeting, Barker and others in the coalition attended a meeting that led to the setting of dates for the appeal hearing, next spring.

HELP THE HUB: In addition for the need of volunteers for officers’ positions on the association’s board, an Admiral Emergency Communications Hub Captain (the Hubs are explained here) is desperately needed. This position would be the go-to person in the event of “the big one.” Someone with experience in disaster response would be ideal. There are hubs throughout West Seattle (see the map here) but Admiral does not have a leader. The Captains monitor volunteers and meet regularly with other Seattle-area hub managers, in addition to being the point-person in event of a disaster.
Barker said in the event of “the big one,” West Seattle is going to be stranded. She said SFD will be occupied with the big stuff, like collapsed bridges and fires. The hubs are quite informal, but if you have resources such as ladders or a generator, that would be where to go to volunteer such items. On the flip side, if you’re alone and have no resources, this is the place to go for help. Wymer said, “We really, really need someone in this position.” If you can step up, or know someone who has the needed skills, contact info@admiralneighborhood.org.

HOLIDAY DECORATIONS NEXT YEAR? One more volunteer position is needed. After speaking to some of the local merchants, including Metropolitan Market, there appears to be interest in establishing a committee to decorate the Admiral Junction for the holiday season next year. If you or anyone you know is interested in chairing such a committee, contact info@admiralneighborhood.org.

NEXT YEAR: The next meeting of the Admiral Neighborhood Association is January 9, 2018, also at the Sanctuary, 2656 42nd Ave SW. Wymer made a motion to discuss revising the organization’s by-laws at the next meeting, to meet quarterly rather than nine times a year, as is the schedule now, unless there is an urgent, specific topic to discuss immediately.

1 Reply to "Admiral Neighborhood Association: From noise to Hubs to HALA and beyond"

  • Admiral Mom December 14, 2017 (9:59 am)

    Thank you Larry and ANA! I think the exhaust noise is definitely the biggest problem. I really think the technology would solve the problem. Although I do see people speeding, a lot of times it just SOUNDS like speeding because the exhaust is so loud (illegal). You can hear it from blocks away. If the police could just crack down and ticket those people, that would be the most helpful!

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