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(15 posts)

Candy Buyback or Donation?


  1. katiebee
    Member Profile

    Is there any business in West Seattle or nearby that is accepting donations of Halloween candy? I know there are a few downtown, but they are only during times that I can't make. Last year I dropped it off at the Food Bank, but I'm wondering if there might be other options this year.

    Posted 1 year ago #         
  2. Really??? There's definitely something wrong with this picture! You take your kids out and let them beg for candy (sorry but that's what it is) and then you try to figure out how to get rid of it???? How about teaching them a new paradigm as some neighborhoods are doing and having the kids trick or treat for food and contributions for food banks and other charitable causes--that would definitely eliminate your dilemma of how to get rid of it.

    Posted 1 year ago #         
  3. PS. I think the Food Bank would prefer "real" food as opposed to non-nutricious piles of candy!

    Posted 1 year ago #         
  4. Last year I purchased too many bags of candy and had some left over after Halloween... don't just automatically assume that katiebee is pawning off the candy from her kids. I found a food bank barrel at one of the local coffee places (the one by Luna Park Cafe)and dropped off the unopened bags of candy and other food items. There's nothing wrong with contributing a few sweets along with other canned and dry foods.

    Posted 1 year ago #         
  5. Rags, having been a client of the WS Food Bank, as well as a former resident of Nickelsville, I can say that the occasional sweet treat was a very welcome diversion, along with the more nutritional food donations.

    Mike

    Posted 1 year ago #         
  6. katiebee
    Member Profile

    Rags, you obviously don't have children. Making your kids ONLY trick-or-treat for canned goods and spare change? Hahahaha! Would you like to circle two blocks and carry home 10 houses worth of canned food?

    For what it's worth, my kids love the experience of trick-or-treating. Seeing the other costumes, running into neighbor friends, seeing house decorations and pumpkins, etc. The candy is not the focus. Plus, they have food allergies. So they pick out some of their favorites that they can safely eat and the rest we have donated in the past. Plus, we bought too much for our house and don't want it just sitting around.

    Posted 1 year ago #         
  7. I bought too much candy or the rain discouraged some of the regulars. As a diabetic, I need to get the leftovers out of the house asap :) Any other reports of places that will take it?

    Posted 1 year ago #         
  8. Ken, Fire Station 37?

    Mike

    Posted 1 year ago #         
  9. Katiebee, I'm not suggesting that Halloween should not be a fun holiday for kids, but there's just something wrong when they bring home so much candy that you don't know how to get rid of it! Just who is benefiting from all of this? The candy companies for sure not to mention dentists for those who can afford to go! I just ask that you explore some opportunities with your kids by sharing some stories like the one about Rachel Beckwith. She's the little 9-year old Bellevue girl who wanted to raise $300 for safe drinking water for African villages by asking friends and relatives to donate money instead of giving her birthday gifts. Tragically, she was killed in an auto accident last year (two months after her birthday). In her memory and dedication to her cause, over $1 million dollars was raised. This is just one example of a child who chose to do something bigger than herself---there are so many like the kids who trick or treated for money for medical expenses for a classmate who was receiving a kidney transplant, the shooting victim in Renton, etc. etc. It's obviously your choice how you want to raise you children, and all I'm suggesting is that you give them choices.

    Posted 1 year ago #         
  10. westcoastdeb
    Member Profile

    It's Halloween. The kids don't have to be 'bigger than themselves'.

    Letting the kids collect candy then donating it to a food bank, homeless shelter, christmas stocking stuffer program, or their local whomever has a candy jar on their desk seems pretty...charitable to me.

    I don't see Halloween as begging though - people willingly participate.

    Posted 1 year ago #         
  11. Letting the kids collect candy then donating it to a food bank, homeless shelter, christmas stocking stuffer program, or their local whomever has a candy jar on their desk seems pretty...charitable to me.

    Spot on.

    For the kids whose parents want them to experience the fun of dressing up, going out in the neighborhood and seeing all the neigbors' reactions, and collecting hopefully what is not a major part of their regular diet, but rather an occasional treat, the entire experience, including donating the extra, can be a great lesson and example of getting a bit of what you want, but can also instill the concept of sharing, with the kids.

    The best case scenario would be to involve the kids fully, perhaps get their thoughts of a worthy recipient, and then if possible, deliver it to the recipients directly, and see the smiles it brings to their faces.

    Mike

    Posted 1 year ago #         
  12. Let the kids package and send it to the troops, maybe include a few drawings or poems they create as well.

    Everybody wins that way!!!

    Posted 1 year ago #         
  13. Another option: candy science. Every year we take some of our (the kids) candy and do "science with it. You'd be amazed how exciting it is! Put candy in water and observe. Does it do the same thing in milk? oil? vinegar? If you have a fireplace, put some candy on a board and see what happens, does it melt? bubble? ooze? There are lots of simple things like this you can do. And your kids are not too old to do it - if they trick or treated it, I bet they'd be interested in playing with it, too!

    Posted 1 year ago #         
  14. Right on Karen!!!

    Posted 1 year ago #         

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