Safety 1159 results

Will Highland Park’s roundabout ever be funded? SDOT update Wednesday

(Early design concept for proposed Highland Park Way roundabout)

Tomorrow night, the Highland Park Action Committee gets an update on the long-in-the-works roundabout proposed for Highland Park Way and SW Holden. SDOT’s James Le is expected to be at the meeting with the newest information. After last month’s meeting, HPAC chair Charlie Omana learned from SDOT that SDOT has been “performing a survey of existing site conditions which should be completed within the next month. Once the survey is complete, project design can proceed, and SDOT intends to engage the public with multiple opportunities for feedback.” But, he added, only $200,000 of the project’s estimated $2.5 million cost has been committed. SDOT says it’s applied for a grant from the WSDOT City Safety Program but won’t hear until later this year. (It’s been half a year since the project was turned down for a different WSDOT grant.) Omana says, “After 5 years of working on this project in its current capacity, to have only $200k committed is disappointing. HPAC is concerned about the effects that increasing construction costs will have on the feasibility of this project over time. … HPAC will continue pushing to bring this project to fruition sooner rather than later.” And that includes Wednesday night’s discussion (7 pm at Highland Park Improvement Club, 1116 SW Holden).

ID-protecting advice in the spotlight as state attorney general visits South Seattle College

(Photo courtesy AARP)

State Attorney General Bob Ferguson was in West Seattle today as part of an event presented at South Seattle College (WSB sponsor) by a coalition led by the AARP. It was the first in a new series, “Taking Charge of Your Digital Identity,” with other events to be held around the state. AARP spokesperson Jason Erskine says consumer-fraud experts advise taking these “three key steps” to better protect your personal information:

1) Take Charge of Your Credit File
Getting a credit freeze is one of the three primary recommendations of security officials to help protect your identity. With a credit freeze in place, a criminal is unable to access your credit file or open new credit accounts. According to AARP’s report however, fewer than one-in-six Washington adults (14%) report having ever ordered a security freeze on their credit.

“Along with checking their credit reports regularly and reviewing bills promptly, many consumers find that freezing their credit is a simple thing they can do to protect themselves from crooks looking to set up phony credit accounts,” says Federal Trade Commission Regional Director Chuck Harwood. “A new Washington state law will soon let all consumers freeze their credit and lift the freeze at no cost.” AARP and the State Attorney General’s Office lobbied for the successful passage of the “Free Credit Freeze for All” law this year, offering free credit freezes and thaws for Washington consumers beginning in June of 2018. Prior to the laws’ passage, consumers had to pay around $10 to each of three credit reporting agencies to freeze their credit files, and another $10 per bureau to thaw their files.

2) Check Your Online Accounts
With the ever increasing number of data breaches, experts say almost all of us have had our personal information exposed to potential identity thieves. So it’s vital that consumers have online access to all of their important bank accounts, credit cards and retirement accounts and to check them frequently. According to AARP’s report however, only four-in-ten (38%) of Washington adults have set-up online accounts for all of their bank accounts, while one-in-five (21%) admit they have not set up online access to any of their bank accounts. Similarly, only half (50%) of Washington adults have set-up online access to all of their credit cards, while more than one-quarter (27%) haven’t set up access to any of their credit cards.

To make matters worse, some consumers who say they are staying offline are doing so for all the wrong reasons. Nearly half of respondents who have not set up online access to some or any of their bank or credit card accounts (45%) say they haven’t because they are afraid their personal information will get stolen; about four-in-ten (41%) say they feel safer without an online account; and over one-third (36%) say they don’t trust the internet. “It’s ironic and unfortunate that fear and mistrust of the internet is actually putting people in greater danger that their personal information will be stolen and used by ID thieves,” says AARP State Director Doug Shadel. “Crooks have told us that people without online accounts are the perfect targets. It allows the criminals to set up online access themselves, and to even set passwords and identifying information locking people out of their own accounts.”

3) Strengthen Your Passwords and Privacy Settings
The difference between secure computing and falling victim to online fraud or identity theft often comes down to a dozen or so keystrokes – your password. However, nearly half (45%) of Washington adults report using the same password for more than one online account. Younger adults are more likely to report doing this compared to older adults (18-49: 49%; 50-64: 46%; 65 and older: 33%). Using the same password across multiple accounts is a very risky practice. If hackers are able to break just one of your codes, they can now access each of your accounts . “Our members know we are very vigilant about protecting their data and often ask us what else they can do. We tell them to treat their passwords like toothbrushes,” says Kyle Welsh, BECU’s Chief Information Security Officer. “Change them frequently; don’t share them; don’t leave them lying around; and the longer you brush, the better.”

Privacy concerns over users personal information on Facebook has also been in the spotlight lately. AARP’s survey shows that among Washington Facebook users 18+, nearly three-quarters (72%) report having changed at least some of their privacy settings from the default settings. However, significantly fewer adults aged 65-and-older (33%) have done this. “Social media sites can be a great way to stay active and engaged, just be careful what you share,” says Jeff Lilleskare, Online Safety & Security Risk Management, Microsoft. “Check your settings to make sure only friends can see what you post, or at most friends of friends. Don’t post when you’re going to be traveling. Don’t share your address, and be careful about taking pictures with sensitive information in them,” he says.

Also at the SSC event, AARP released a new report surveying adult internet users in our state, “Up for Grabs”; Erskine says it revealed that “a lack of awareness and knowledge of online dangers may be contributing to increased dangers for Washington consumers” You can see the report here.

FOLLOWUP: 35th Avenue SW ‘Phase 2’ info now online

Three weeks ago, we brought you first word of SDOT‘s decision about Phase 2 for 35th Avenue SW. The relatively small changes will include adding a stoplight at 35th/Dawson, turn restrictions at 35th/Juneau, the already-promised 35th/Graham stoplight, turn signals at 35th/Barton (which is in the Phase 1 zone), but no continuation of the rechannelization that comprised Phase 1 south of Morgan. When we talked with SDOT’s Jim Curtin on April 2nd, he said the plan would soon be added to the project website, and would be sent to many West Seattle homes in a mailer. That mailer arrived over the weekend, and the website is now updated – including the map shown above (here’s the full-size PDF version) – so if you want to see the official final version, here’s the project page. No further meetings planned, but if you have questions, Curtin says, you can e-mail the project team at 35thAveSW@seattle.gov.

Drop-in meeting Saturday morning, survey open now for West Seattle Neighborhood Greenway extension to North Admiral

April 13, 2018 7:18 pm
|    Comments Off on Drop-in meeting Saturday morning, survey open now for West Seattle Neighborhood Greenway extension to North Admiral
 |   Safety | Transportation | West Seattle news

Two weeks ago, we reported on the plan to build the West Seattle Neighborhood Greenway all the way into North Admiral, instead of having its north end at The Junction. The city also announced two drop-in meetings for feedback, and plans for a survey. The first of those meetings is tomorrow morning – and the survey is open now. You can answer it here, and/or stop by Uptown Espresso at California/Edmunds/Erskine, 10:30-noon on Saturday. Meantime, from an update sent by SDOT, more information about the greenway plan:

Our final route for the West Seattle Neighborhood Greenway reflects many of the needs we heard from the community to connect people with schools, parks, local businesses, and the greater transportation network. The new neighborhood greenway will bring affordable, active transportation options for all ages and abilities.

Below are several community priorities we incorporated into our final design:

*Design the pedestrian safety islands so they’re wider to give people adequate space for their bikes

*Time the new traffic signal at 35th Ave SW and SW Graham St with the rest of the 35th Ave SW traffic signals to reduce corridor-wide delay as much as possible
*Upgrade access to the existing signals for people walking and biking at
30th Ave SW and SW Barton St
30th Ave SW and SW Roxbury St

*Install traffic calming near Our Lady of Guadalupe School

*Minimize any on-street parking loss

*Reduce gravel on the sidewalk and street along SW Kenyon St

*Enhance traffic calming on 30th Ave SW and SW Thistle St

We’ve been able to incorporate all these elements into our work plan. Thank you for sharing such helpful insights.

Phase 1 Construction
The first phase of construction for the West Seattle Neighborhood Greenway will begin later this spring and is expected to continue through 2018. This phase of construction, which begins at SW Roxbury St and ends at SW Graham St, allows us to open a large section of the Greenway an entire year earlier than expected!

During phase 1 construction you should expect temporary detours, parking changes, and crossing closures so that we can install greenway pieces such as pedestrian safety islands and new crosswalks at intersections. We’ll be in constant communication throughout construction to ensure we coordinate with residents and businesses directly affected by specific projects.

We recognize that construction is an inconvenience and appreciate your patience and communication as we begin creating the West Seattle Greenway for you and your neighbors to enjoy.

Schedule …

Construction is broken up into three phases. This will enable us to start installing greenway improvements earlier than expected. We are excited to help people get to important community locations like Roxhill park by walking and biking in 2018, a full year earlier than anticipated.
The three phases are highlighted below:

Phase 1: SW Roxbury to SW Graham St on 30th Ave
Construction starting in spring 2018

Phase 2: SW Graham to SW Edmunds St
Construction as soon as fall 2019

North Admiral Connection: SW Edmunds St to SW College St
Outreach & planning beginning spring 2018
Construction as soon as 2020-2022

This will be West Seattle’s third greenway, after North Delridge and Highland Park/South Delridge. You can find more project information here. And if you can’t get to tomorrow morning’s drop-in discussion, the second one is Thursday (April 19th), 4:15-5:45 pm, at West Seattle (Admiral) Library, 2306 42nd SW.

A conversation about a costly crisis: The price being paid, and not paid, to save young lives

By Tracy Record
West Seattle Blog editor

The two scenes could scarcely have seemed more divergent:

A comfortable waterfront home in Fauntleroy / a crowded complex in Burien.

The sound of small talk and laughter / the crackle of gunshots, followed by chaos.

A colorful rug adorning a wood floor / blood staining the pavement.

The scenes were five miles and eight days apart – with one connection: A crisis.

In Burien, that crisis, youth violence – youth, in reference to the victims and/or perpetrators – stole two young women’s lives.

In Fauntleroy, that crisis, youth violence, brought together an extraordinary assemblage of people who all had the ability to do something about it.

Read More

Expired, no-longer-needed prescription medication in your home? Drug Take-Back Day 2018 is 3 weeks away

Don’t flush it, don’t toss it – if you have expired or unneeded prescription medication to get rid of, Drug Take-Back Day is only three weeks away. Southwest Precinct commander Capt. Pierre Davis sends the reminder that the national event is set for 10 am-2 pm on Saturday, April 28th, and the precinct is a drop-off spot as usual, 2300 SW Webster. P.S. If that day doesn’t work for you, note that the Junction QFC pharmacy is now a year-round dropoff spot. (Photo – start of 5th bag filled by dropoffs during last October’s Drug Take-Back Day at the SW Precinct)

See SDOT’s final design for Chief Sealth Walkway Improvements Project in Westwood

SDOT has announced the “final design” for the Chief Sealth Walkway Improvements project in Westwood, which you’ll recall was at one point going to be reduced, and then was restored to full size. From SDOT:

This project will improve connectivity, walkability, and safety for residents and students who currently use two unimproved and overgrown paths on 25th and 26th avenues SW, between SW Trenton and SW Cloverdale streets.

Project elements include:

• Two 10-foot-wide asphalt walkways on 25th and 26th avenues SW connecting SW Trenton St and the cul-de-sacs to the north
• Pedestrian lights along the two paths
• Removal of overgrown vegetation and installation of new trees and plants, where appropriate

This document has backstory from the original community proposal. Construction could start as soon as mid-May, says SDOT, which also says the final design is available for another NSF project, Harbor/Spokane, but as of right now still has not updated that project website to show it. Also, both projects will be handled by the same contractor, and SDOT says the bid/award process isn’t complete yet.

FOLLOWUP: Safety additions at apartment complex where 2 cars flipped in 1 night

(WSB photo from last December)

You might recall that scene from the last week of last year – two flipped cars alongside an apartment complex on the SW Genesee hill west of Avalon. It was the aftermath of two crashes in one snowy night, over the span of a few hours starting late Christmas Eve. No serious injuries. The second driver to crash that night, KC, had wondered in post-crash comment discussion why the complex had no safety barriers along the driveway, given the dropoff – and now, KC tells us, that’s changed, with this installation yesterday:

KC adds, in the note accompanying that photo: “After the event, I never wanted any monetary compensation but only for safety devices installed and an admission that there was a clear and present danger! I have had nothing to do with how these have come to be… but they have been installed so others may be spared the over the rockery trip. As far as admission of a hazard… I take comfort in knowing actions often speak louder than words, such is the case here!”

FYI from SPD: Level 3 sex offender moves into the area

Just received from Southwest Precinct crime-prevention coordinator Jennifer Danner, another one of the occasional notifications that a Level 3 sex offender has moved into the area:

In an effort to keep you informed, and in our constant attempts to reduce future victimization, we want to let you know about one level 3 sex offender that has recently moved into the Southwest Precinct area.

Jeremy Lelko, a 39-year-old White male, is a level 3 registered sex offender who has recently moved to the 5000 Block of California Ave SW. Mr. Lelko is no longer under Department of Corrections supervision.

Detective Spong from the Seattle Police Department’s Sex Offender Detail is responsible for verifying his addresses as long as he is living there.

To learn more about this offender and for additional safety tips please visit the website at www.waspc.org and search by his name. [Editor’s note: His photo and background information are on this page.]

If you have further questions about this offender, contact Michelle McRae of the Seattle Police Sex Offender Detail by phone at (206) 684-5581 or by e-mail at michelle.mcrae@seattle.gov.

To register to receive an email alert whenever a published offender registers within one mile of your desired addresses, go to (this) link.

Level 3 sex offenders pose the highest risk to re-offend. It is normal to feel upset, angry and worried about a registered sex offender living in your community. The Community Notification Act of 1990 requires sex offenders to register in the community where they live. The law also allows local law enforcement to make the public aware about Level 2 and Level 3 offenders. Since these offenders have completed their sentences, they are free to live where they wish. Experts believe sex offenders are less likely to re-offend if they live and work in an environment free of harassment. Any actions taken against the listed sex offenders could result in arrest and prosecution as it is against the law to use this information in any way to threaten, intimidate or harass registered sex offenders. The SPD Sex Offender Detectives will check on these offenders every 3 months to verify our information.

The single most effective means of protecting your child is communication with your child. They have to feel comfortable discussing sensitive matters with you. Teach your children that they should not be asked to touch anyone in the bathing suit areas of their body or allow anyone to touch them in those areas. Teach them types of situations to avoid. It is not good enough to tell a child to avoid strangers. Please remember that children are most often molested by someone they or their parents know.

Please feel free to call or email me with questions and/or to schedule a Block Watch meeting if your block is interested. My office phone at the precinct is (206) 256-6820.

Why Seattle Public Schools will have increased security on Tuesday

Thanks to the parent who forwarded us the following message that Seattle Public Schools subsequently confirmed to us was sent to families throughout the district:

In recent weeks, a social media post from the United Kingdom began promoting April 3 as “Harm a Muslim” Day. Social media can spread messages quickly, and some of SPS students are talking about this.

While this activity seems to be focused in Europe, in an abundance of caution, there will be increased security at schools. If you hear of something, please contact the district Safety & Security office at 206-252-0510 or call 9-1-1 if it is an emergency.

As a school system, we will do everything we can to make sure our students are safe while in our care. Anyone who feels unsafe or targeted for any reason should immediately contact a trusted adult.

Harassment of any kind is not, and will not, be tolerated in Seattle Public Schools.

New York schools also are increasing security; Portland’s school district has sent a message to families after discovering flyers about the “day.”

DATES CHANGED: Drop-in discussions for West Seattle Neighborhood Greenway

March 30, 2018 3:14 pm
|    Comments Off on DATES CHANGED: Drop-in discussions for West Seattle Neighborhood Greenway
 |   Safety | Transportation | West Seattle news

As reported here back on Tuesday, SDOT says the planned West Seattle Neighborhood Greenway will extend into North Admiral, and invites you to two drop-in discussions about that. But the dates/locations have just been changed – SDOT’s Dawn Schellenberg says that has fixed a conflict with Seattle Public Schools‘ spring-break week (and we also note that one previously announced location that was way too small for a community meeting has been swapped out). The new dates/locations:

Saturday, April 14
10:30 AM-Noon
Uptown Espresso (Junction location, California/Edmunds/Erskine)

Thursday April 19
4:15-5:45 PM
West Seattle Library (Admiral District)

This will be West Seattle’s third greenway, after 26th SW in North Delridge and (South) Delridge-Highland Park.

‘Problem solver’ explains local justice/court system to West Seattle Block Watch Captains Network

From last night’s West Seattle Block Watch Captains Network meeting at the precinct:

(Precinct liaison Joe Everett, right, with precinct commander Capt. Pierre Davis seated at left)

PRECINCT LIAISON EXPLAINS THE JUSTICE SYSTEM: Joe Everett, the Southwest Precinct‘s liaison from the City Attorney’s Office, gave an overview, starting with an explanation of his role – the face of a “long-term, proactive partnership.” The program started in 1995 “as a thing that happened downtown,” then over time “moved out to the precincts.” Until late last year, South and Southwest Precincts were handled by one liaison lawyer; now, each precinct has its own. Reducing crime, developing a more efficient/effective response to public-safety problems, improving communications are all part of what he’s supposed to help with. Also: “Providing real-time, proactive legal advice for officers … protecting SPD resources by working closely with other City agencies to address neighborhood problems before they become criminal problems.” Overall, “I like to think of myself as a problem solver,” he summarized.

Explaining the court system:

Read More

FOLLOWUP: School-zone beacons, curb-ramp upgrades on SW Admiral Way

We checked in with SDOT today to see when the promised school-zone beacons would be installed on SW Admiral Way near Alki Elementary. Spokesperson Dawn Schellenberg replied, “The flashing beacon equipment has arrived. Installation to complete the work will happen in the next few weeks.” And she added this update on the 49th SW/SW Admiral Way intersection:

In addition to the other improvements planned at this intersection, our pedestrian program decided to upgrade the curb ramps on the side where the crosswalk is being moved and the flashing beacons are being installed. We’re completing the curb ramp design based on this updated improvement. The addition, however, will delay the installation somewhat. We still expect to have everything complete in 2018.

After her reply, we went by 49th/Admiral for a photo and discovered an SDOT crew had just arrived on scene:

The school-zone beacons were not part of the original SW Admiral Way Safety Project plan, but resulted from a discussion with Alki Elementary parents.

What ever happened to Phase 2 of SDOT’s 35th SW Safety Project?

(Looking south on 35th SW, south of SW Dawson)

More than four years ago, the city announced a “multi-year” safety project for 35th SW. One year after that, the first major phase was announced, including rechannelization between Roxbury and Willow. Another year passed before Phase 2 possibilities were unveiled – but no final plan has followed. After recent reader questions, we checked in today with SDOT point person Jim Curtin, five months after he told us Phase 2 was definitely still in the works. He tells WSB that Phase 2 “outreach” is now scheduled to start in early April, with “a mailer with the Phase 2 project elements, construction schedule, and potential project impacts,” as well as “a couple of drop-in sessions to gather input” and a website update that will include “the latest stats for Phase 1.”

González, Durkan, Holmes say they’re working on new gun-safety laws

Two weeks ago during a “town hall” event at Chief Sealth International High School, Mayor Jenny Durkan said the city was looking at laws to help prevent violence involving guns. Today, she and two other citywide elected officials announced what they’re working on – here’s the news release:

Seattle Mayor Jenny A. Durkan, Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes, and Councilmember M. Lorena González announced that they will be developing legislation within the next month to address gun violence in Seattle. Following outreach and engagement with stakeholders including gun owners, safety advocates, community members, public health experts and others, this legislation will require safe storage of firearms and increase civil penalties and legal responsibility for not reporting lost or stolen firearms, which is required within 24 hours.

“We should not pretend for one second that the level of carnage in our country from guns is inevitable. We cannot allow it to become the new normal,” said Mayor Durkan. “Unsecured, unsafely stored firearms are more likely to be stolen, used in a suicide, accessed by children and teens and unintentionally fired.”

Across the country, nearly 1,300 children die and 5,790 are treated for gunshot wounds each year. In 2015, an estimated 150,000 adults in King County reported keeping a firearm unlocked. In Seattle, 250 stolen guns were reported from burglaries and car prowls in 2017 according to Seattle Police Department.

“We’re taking seriously the call to action from youth and their families to address gun violence in our schools, our communities, and within our own homes,” said Councilmember M. Lorena González (Citywide, Position 9). “More than 40 percent of King County adults with guns in or around their home said they left them unlocked. This legislation is about public safety. Our proposal to require gunowners to safely store their firearms will prevent children from accessing guns, and will reduce firearm injuries, accidental deaths and suicides among our youth. Simply put: this strategy will help us create a safer community.”

“Gun violence and mass shootings are a plague on our society, and for too long our federal and state governments have failed to enact common sense measures to promote gun safety. I support, and am prepared to defend, Seattle taking steps to move forward at the local level,” said Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes.

In 2015, the Seattle City Council passed legislation to establish a tax on gun and ammunition sales to fund gun violence prevention research. Although the City Council continued funding gun violence prevention work at Harborview Injury Prevention & Research Center, the revenue was initially blocked due to ongoing litigation. With the tax upheld by the State Supreme Court, this proposal will invest 2018 revenue and future gun and ammo tax revenues in Harborview Injury Prevention & Research Center’s work to help individuals with firearm injuries.

In 2013, Seattle became the first city in the nation to conduct basic research on gun safety. The City Council-funded research led to a report from The Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center that established that “gun violence begets gun violence.” The research found that individuals hospitalized for a firearm injury were 30 times more likely to be re-hospitalized for another firearm injury than people admitted to the hospital for non-firearm related injuries.

In addition, the City of Seattle and Seattle Police Department launched a new site, seattle.gov/ERPO, to ensure all Seattle residents can easily complete an Extreme Risk Protection Order (ERPO). An ERPO was designed to give family, household members, and law enforcement a way to petition the court to restrict the access and ability for a person with health crisis issues to purchase or possess firearms. In Seattle, 18 ERPOs have been petitioned by law enforcement with 37 weapons recovered.

“From Columbine to Newtown to Parkland, we are constantly reminded that Extreme Risk Protection Orders are more important than ever. These protection orders won’t prevent every act of gun violence, but we know they are already making a difference,” said Seattle Interim Police Chief Carmen Best.

Councilmember González, a West Seattle resident re-elected last year to a citywide council seat, chairs the committee that would consider new laws, the Gender Equity, Safe Communities, New Americans, and Education Committee.

REMINDER: Alaskan Way Viaduct inspection closure next weekend

As we first mentioned a week and a half ago, next weekend brings what just might be the last of the Alaskan Way Viaduct‘s twice-yearly inspection closures. It’s officially scheduled for two days as usual – 6 am-6 pm Saturday, March 24th, and 6 am-6 pm Sunday, March 25th – but these closures have tended in recent years to just need the first day.

For history fans, summaries of the inspections going back more than 15 years can be read here. As for why we note that this might be the last semiannual inspection, yet another briefing last Thursday (like this one three weeks ago) suggested the AWV might be out of service before October arrives.

WEST SEATTLE CRIME WATCH: Stolen silver CR-V (update – found!); car prowl; free offer for businesses

March 13, 2018 11:34 am
|    Comments Off on WEST SEATTLE CRIME WATCH: Stolen silver CR-V (update – found!); car prowl; free offer for businesses
 |   Crime | Safety | West Seattle news

Three items in West Seattle Crime Watch so far today:

STOLEN CR-V: From Taylor:

> Wanted to put the word out my car was stolen sometime between Monday afternoon at 3pm (last seen) to 5:00 am Tuesday morning (today). Car was stolen out of my apartment building’s parking lot, which is open off the street (no garage or gate) on 35th Ave between the blocks of Barton and Trenton. Car is a silver 1999 Honda CR-V. Police report has been filed. License plates AMY0339.

TUESDAY EVENING UPDATE: Taylor tells us the car was found in Burien.

CAR PROWL: TM on 42nd SW in Gatewood reported this morning, “My car was run through some time last night. Parked on the street, must have been unlocked. Looks like just change taken from closed console but hard to tell right now.” If you live in the area and have a car, TM suggests, you might consider checking to see if you got hit too.

BUSINESS SAFETY: Monday afternoon, we mentioned tip-jar thieves reported in The Junction, all too common of a crime. Southwest Precinct Crime Prevention Coordinator Jennifer Danner reminds us that one of her roles is to “provide safety/security assessments for businesses- using Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) principles, in addition to supplying tips based on recent crime trends and patterns.” (And yes, that includes talking about tip jars.) This is a free service. You can e-mail her at jennifer.danner@seattle.gov or call 206-256-6820.

Arbor Heights sidewalk project will start soon, says SDOT

SDOT says the long-planned sidewalk project along 35th SW in Arbor Heights will start construction soon – possibly before the end of the month. It was originally scheduled for last year, but as reported here in December, it slid to this year. And now, we have received an update from SDOT project spokesperson Ching Chan, along with the “fact sheet” and map embedded above (and visible here):

As you may know, this project to improve the intersections along 35th Ave SW, from SW 100th St to SW 106th St near Arbor Heights Elementary and Westside School, has been in the planning stage for a couple of years now. Due to a number of factors, the project was placed on hold previously. I am writing to inform you that the Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) will be moving forward with the construction work and may begin construction as early as the week of March 26. We hope to complete this project before school starts in September.

Chan says SDOT already has “reached out to Arbor Heights Elementary, Westside School, Seattle Public Schools Transportation Department, and sent construction notices to nearby residents to inform them of the upcoming construction work,” but that still doesn’t include everyone who drives/rides/walks in the area, so they asked us to get the word out too. Chan also says SDOT is working to schedule a “public meeting to help provide more project information to community members in a couple of weeks” – we’ll publish a followup when there’s a date/time/place for that.

SAFETY: Southwest Precinct offers free gun locks

March 1, 2018 8:19 pm
|    Comments Off on SAFETY: Southwest Precinct offers free gun locks
 |   Safety | West Seattle news | West Seattle police

If you have a gun in your residence, the Southwest Precinct has a free cable lock if you need one. Here’s the reminder sent today:

Due to recent incidents nationwide, the Seattle Police Department’s Southwest Precinct would like to remind our community about firearm safety, specifically when it comes to proper and safe storage of firearms and ammunition.

The SW Precinct has free firearm cable locks for interested community members! And we would also be happy to speak with you about firearm safety, safe storage, and general questions.

If you are interested in firearm cable locks, or in speaking with the Seattle Police Department about firearm safety, please contact Jennifer Danner, the SW Precinct Crime Prevention Coordinator, at Jennifer.Danner@seattle.gov or 206-256-6820.

P.S. If you missed her presentation on Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design at this week’s West Seattle Block Watch Captains Network meeting – we covered it here.

SAFETY: Denny International Middle School reports threat made by student, says police determined it was ‘not … credible’

March 1, 2018 3:54 pm
|    Comments Off on SAFETY: Denny International Middle School reports threat made by student, says police determined it was ‘not … credible’
 |   Safety | West Seattle news | West Seattle schools

Just received this afternoon from Denny International Middle School principal Jeff Clark, a letter he and Chief Sealth International High School principal Aida Fraser-Hammer sent to families:

We want to share information regarding an incident that occurred yesterday. We are sending you this letter to update you and to assure you that we are always doing everything we can to support our scholars.

Late yesterday afternoon, it was reported that a Denny scholar made a threat toward the school. School administrators immediately took action to assess the situation and reported to the Seattle Police Department (SPD) and the District Safety and Security Office. The parents of scholar who made the threat have been contacted, and the scholar is being disciplined consistent with district procedures and provided additional social/emotional support. SPD has concluded its investigation and determined that it was not a credible threat.

As you are aware, our adolescents have complex social dynamics. Ensuring that our youth know appropriate behavioral expectations and that all scholars are safe is our goal. Our staff continues to discuss personal safety with scholars. We will continue to follow up about the importance of SPD’s campaign regarding “See Something, Say Something” in order to maximize safety. We are very proud of how our scholars and families responded to this incident and reported their concerns appropriately.

At school, we differentiate “reporting” from “tattle-telling.” Reporting is a responsibility when someone is hurt, in danger or in an unsafe situation. I am providing a link to some additional information that might be helpful during these discussions with your families: http://www.seattle.gov/police/community-policing/youth-safety-tips.

Please be assured that the safety and security of our scholars will always be our top priority. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.

We’re checking with police to see if any additional information is available.

SPENDING $3 MILLION: First District 1 ‘Your Voice, Your Choice’ review meeting; 4 more to choose from!

If you missed the first “project development” meeting tonight for this year’s Your Voice, Your Choice process to figure out which of hundreds of community-suggested park/street projects will get a share of $3 million … you have four more to choose from. Participants at each meeting are evaluating a specific group of projects – different at every meeting – as grouped and color-coded on this map. Next one is tomorrow night in South Park (6 pm at SP Community Center, 8319 8th Ave. S.), to review the suggestions for that area; then there are three more meetings in West Seattle, one daytime and two nighttime (all listed here). And if you can’t make it to the meeting for the project area you’d like to evaluate, the city says you can access the project lists for all areas of each district (ours is D-1) at any meeting in that district. After this round, the next step is voting, with online and in-person opportunities starting in June.

Chief Sealth IHS PTSA’s annual safety meeting tackles preparedness, policies, love, more

By Tracy Record
West Seattle Blog editor

Every year, the Chief Sealth International High School PTSA devotes one of its monthly meetings to school safety – talking about procedures, answering questions.

This year, the meeting was held off-campus at Neighborhood House in High Point, where about two dozen people gathered last Wednesday night, including faculty, parents, district managers, and even elected officials with past and future Sealth students in their families.

Teacher Susie Clark organized the meeting and introduced Sealth principal Aida Fraser-Hammer. Safety is about being “prepared to respond to the unthinkable crisis,” the principal said, and about being able to “react to unexpected events in ways that avoid panic and maintain an atmosphere of calmness.”

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FOLLOWUP: 2 Neighborhood Street Fund projects going out to bid

Almost a year and a half after they were chosen for funding, two Neighborhood Street Fund projects proposed by West Seattleites are going out to bid. A notice in today’s Daily Journal of Commerce announces that the city is seeking bids on a package of five NSF projects meant to improve walking and biking safety, two of which are in West Seattle – the Chief Sealth Walkway Improvements and the Harbor Ave. SW/SW Spokane St. Intersection Improvements Project. The notice says bids will be opened March 7th; we’ll be checking with SDOT on the anticipated construction schedule.

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