Neighborhoods 523 results

More community-cleanup success: 25th & Trenton, with SDCG and WWRHAH volunteers

Thanks to Marianne McCord from the South Delridge Community Group for that photo from today’s SDCG/Westwood-Roxhill-Arbor Heights Community Council cleanup at 25th/Trenton. She reports 16 volunteers were there, as was SDOT‘s Natalie Graves from the Chief Sealth Walkway Neighborhood Street Fund project that’s planned in the area. She adds: “I want to give a shout out to our dedicated volunteers who attend monthly clean-ups around the South Delridge Neighborhood. They are making a difference!” Watch the SDCG website for word of its next meeting (usually third Sundays, but this month, that’s Easter).

PHOTOS: Neighborhood volunteers clean Fairmount Ravine for the 25th year

Along the road and on the slope, another big haul in the annual Fairmount Ravine (north of here) cleanup today.

This was the 25th annual edition of the cleanup, this year coordinated by Matt Algieri, taking over for John Lang. Here are today’s volunteers, with Southwest Precinct Community Police Team Officers Jon Flores and Todd Wiebke:

They had piled up more than 80 bags – similar to last year – by the time a Department of Corrections community-work crew arrived for pickup and haulaway:

Here are links to our coverage from past years – 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008.

YOU CAN HELP! Fairmount Ravine, Westwood neighborhood TLC tomorrow

Before we get to previews for today, two reminders for tomorrow that a great way to start your weekend is to give a little of your time to help a local neighborhood shine. We have cleanups north and south, and every single extra person makes a big difference:

(Photo from 2013 Fairmount Ravine event)

25TH ANNUAL FAIRMOUNT RAVINE CLEANUP: As previewed here, this is not just a cleanup, but also some TLC for trees – ivy removal. 8:30-10:30 am Saturday; meet at Fairmount and Forest, at the top (south end) of the ravine [map]. We are told the Southwest Precinct Community Police Team will be helping this year too.

25TH AND TRENTON: The South Delridge Community Group and Westwood-Roxhill-Arbor Heights Community Council are teaming up at this site [map] and will be happy to see you join them here for one quick hour of work, 10 am-11 am Saturday.

FAUNTLEROY BOULEVARD PROJECT: Community group’s 2nd meeting planned

2016_nov_fauntleroy60_planview

One month ago today, we published our report on the launch meeting of the Fauntleroy Way Neighborhood and Business Association, formed out of concerns related to the years-in-the-works, in-final-design-phase Fauntleroy Boulevard project. The group has just announced its second meeting, 7:30 pm Wednesday, April 19th, with a list of current/continuing questions and concerns:

The Fauntleroy Way Neighborhood and Business Association will host this meeting to discuss the current status of the Fauntleroy Way Boulevard project. Our aim is to leave this meeting with a clearer understanding of the project with respect to the following Association interests:

PROJECT DESIGN

Traffic studies. Per SDOT, a new traffic study was ordered. Our requests for an update have gone unanswered, to date.

Current design completion. We were informed the design is now at 90%, but have not received updates from the SDOT mailing list, from SDOT directly, or how any traffic study may have impacted design updates.

Treed medians vs. left turn lanes. SDOT indicated that they were re-examining additional access along Fauntleroy Way in place of planned treed medians, but we have received no update, to date.

Addition of crosswalks. Much of the justification for this project relates to pedestrian safety, but no additional crosswalks are planned. At our last meeting with SDOT, we were told this was being examined, but we have received no update, to date.

Loading zones and temporary parking. Will there be any spaces along the street that allow for short-term parking, e.g. 3-minute loading and unloading.

DURING CONSTRUCTION

Construction worker parking. Given the squeeze on existing parking in the area, will workers be made to park outside the area of affected business to allow greater access by our patrons?

Communication of the project to the neighborhood. What is SDOT’s plan for communicating traffic plans to the West Seattle community? Businesses would like some say in the way this is communicated to help keep our doors open.

Signage for businesses during construction. We’ve been advised by OED that this is normally not planned for. Given the extended duration of this project, we would like to reach a compromise.

Pedestrian access. Will pedestrians have access to the length of Fauntleroy Way throughout construction?

Mitigation. We have been advised by OED that the only mitigating assistance the City will provide to impacted businesses will be in the form of access to construction updates and influence on project phasing and planning. We seek more clarity around this so that we can plan ahead to work together.

Traffic re-routing plan. We would like any update available on the planned traffic re-routing during construction. Per the note on mitigation, our strong preference would be to keep traffic moving in both directions along Fauntleroy Way for the length of the project.

23rd Project. What has SDOT/the City learned from the 23rd Ave project that will positively impact the Fauntleroy Way project?

Please contact us with any questions or concerns:
Fauntleroy Way Neighborhood and Business Association fauntleroywayassoc@gmail.com

The April 19th meeting will be in the Rotary Room at the West Seattle YMCA (36th/Snoqualmie; WSB sponsor).

Help make history! Be part of the 25th annual Fairmount Ravine Spring Cleanup and Reforestation

fairmounttrash
(Part of the 2016 cleanup haul; photo courtesy John Lang)

The annual Fairmount Ravine community cleanup and forest-restoration event is the longest-running event of its kind that we’ve heard of, at least in our decade of publishing WSB. This year’s edition is coming up next Saturday, and it’s the first one organized by Matt Algieri, after John Lang‘s many years of coordination. If you run, ride, walk, or drive through the ravine – consider starting next Saturday by helping out, even if you can only spare an hour:

Fairmount Ravine Preservation Group will sponsor the 25th Annual Spring Cleanup and Reforestation of Fairmount Ravine, Saturday, April 8th at 8:30 am. Meet at top of the ravine (Forest St. and Fairmount Ave.). Wear long, rugged clothing, boots and gloves. Bring a pruning saw or large loppers if interested in removing ivy from trees. Delicious beverages and food from our local merchants will be provided.

We extend a special invitation to those who use the ravine to access the waterfront; please donate an hour or two of your time to keep this greenbelt healthy and pristine. Plus, we will have a lot of fun and meet our neighbors. More info – call Matt at 206 747-4167.

ALSO TONIGHT: Your last chance to help decide which proposed park/street projects advance to ‘Your Voice, Your Choice’ vote

West Seattle/South Park residents proposed more than 200 ways to spend almost $300,000 in city grant money for park/street projects … and tonight is your last chance to help decide which ones will move on to a vote. From Jenny Frankl at the Department of Neighborhoods:

This will be the final meeting to decide what projects will move forward. Meeting kicks off @ 5:30 p.m. @ the Southwest Branch of the Seattle Public Library (9010 35th Ave SW).

*If you are just now plugging into this process, first and foremost, welcome! Secondly, just wanted to quickly catch you up – In the previous three meetings for District 1, each D1 project that has been submitted has been reviewed and scored twice (with the exception of those listed below). This meeting tomorrow will be to select from the projects that received the highest scores from those two reviews.

*For those of you who have attended one of these prior meetings, this meeting will be slightly different than the others so far, so I also wanted to give you a better idea of what to expect.

We will be reviewing three sets of projects, that you can find on the updated District 1 Project Map:

*The projects that were scored the highest in the previous District 1 project development meetings and indicated by green pinpoints

*The projects that were scored twice, but the two scores varied greatly are indicated by yellow pinpoints

*The projects that still need to receive their second review are indicated by red pinpoints

In tonight’s meeting, you all will review the orange & red projects first. Once we receive their additional scores, we will tally up their collective scores, and add the highest scored projects to the other list of projects that have scored highly in this process. You will all then review and prioritize the overall list of highly-scored projects.

The goal for the meeting is to select 10 of these projects that will first advance to SDOT/Parks for a thorough feasibility and cost assessment, and then on to the ballot in June!

Anyone is welcome to participate tonight, whether you’ve been to one of the previous review meetings or not.

As first reported here back in January, this is the city’s new process replacing what had long been vetting of proposals and projects through neighborhood-district councils, until the mayor’s decision last year to cut the city’s ties with, and nominal funding for, those groups. (The two in West Seattle, Southwest and Delridge, are continuing on as independent organizations meeting monthly.)

@ Highland Park Action Committee: Unrepaired park damage, unscheduled Find It, Fix It, and more

yellowtape
(WSB photo, June 2016)

By Tracy Record
West Seattle Blog editor

Riverview Playfield needs some TLC – including repairs for a restroom damaged by fire last year, the Highland Park Action Committee agreed last night, during a meeting that spanned a wide range of neighborhood concerns:

RIVERVIEW TLC AND FIRE REPAIRS: With improvements completed and under way at Westcrest Park and Highland Park, HPAC talked about supporting some attention for Riverview Playfield. Its then-three-year-old restroom/storage building was set on fire last June and still hasn’t been fixed; HPIC member Craig Rankin reported contacting Seattle Parks recently to ask about that and being told that staff is working on an estimate so it can be added to an “asset list” to be handled sometime in 2018-2023.

The fields are popular for sports, including being the home of West Seattle Baseball, so potential revenue loss for the city was discussed. HPAC hopes to have this and other Riverview needs on the list of stops for the Highland Park Find It, Fix It Walk later this year.

Speaking of which …

WAITING TO FIND OUT ABOUT ‘FIND IT, FIX IT’: The plan to have one in HP was announced by a city rep almost two months ago at a community meeting about the sanctioned encampment on Myers Way. But there’s been no word of the date or of the start of a planning process.

So HPAC’s going to start talking about where they want to go on the walk and what they want to see accomplished. Besides Riverview, the Highland Park Way/Holden intersection – for which locals have long been trying to get safety upgrades – will be a prime spot to visit.

Speaking of the encampment …

COMMUNITY ADVISORY COUNCIL FOR CAMP SECOND CHANCE: HPAC chair Gunner Scott asked if anyone would be able to represent HPAC on this newly formed group, part of the deal for the city sanctioning of the encampment. Scott noted that some of the services that they’ve requested for the camp and vicinity – lighting, Dumpster, etc. – are showing up (we recently reported the lighting installation). HPAC members also talked about getting solicited to join some of the regional groups that have sprung up to campaign against camps, and while HPAC has concerns about the city’s policies and plans, they’re skeptical of the groups’ motives and memberships and not planning to join.

YOUR VOICE, YOUR CHOICE: Also on the community-advisory front, this ongoing new city process for vetting potential street/park grant projects was the subject of a discussion similar to the one at the Admiral Neighborhood Association last week – that the process as it is now is not nearly as effective and thorough as the old one done through district councils, where presentations of projects for review would include information from neighborhood residents who know the area. Scott had been to one of the “project development” meetings where he said people were asking each other, do you know this area? Is this something that’s needed?

It was also noted that $285,000 per council district seems to be less than was allocated before – “$2.85 per person,” as one attendee noted, since West Seattle has ~100,000. Also, chair Scott noted, the grant process has been under way for so many years, there should be an existing list of needs “instead of making us go through this crazy process.” And Scott noted that all the complaints about district councils not reaching out to enough people don’t seem to have been acted on by the city – and now they’ve turned what was a two-meeting process into a four-meetings-and-more process. One person said it was great that there were so many ideas from West Seattle – more than 200 (as reported here).

HPAC is considering sending a letter with the suggestion that basic needs be addressed in the future before another round of new ideas is solicited. Another suggestion was that proposals, especially those made repeatedly, exist in “living documents” within the city somewhere so there can be reference – “since this was first proposed in 1986, the population has tripled” type of information. One person said that it’s frustrating to see projects get requested year after year, but some projects not requested turn up seemingly overnight.

HPAC leadership will talk more about the issue. Co-chair Michele Witzki suggested getting a rep from Feet First to come talk with the group so they can learn more about effective advocacy.

CRIME UPDATES: Southwest Precinct Operations Lt. Ron Smith presented the latest info as the meeting began: Auto theft is up, car prowls are down. Property crimes overall are down a third.

This week’s Seaview package-theft arrest was a springboard for a discussion of how security cameras really help police. Lt. Smith said, “The quality is so good – it’s amazing. For each car prowler or package thief we arrest, they’re good for many, many more.”

Would the precinct consider offering training on security-camera use and best practices? Lt. Smith will look into it. Maybe, he said, that could be a project for former intern Jennifer Burbridge, who he said has been hired as a full-time crime analyst – the first time the Southwest Precinct has had one.

A few more minutes of discussion with Lt. Smith touched on derelict properties, trespass agreements, and how to complain to the city. One attendee said it’s clear the rules/laws have to change – and that it’s time for citizens to apply pressure on that.

NEW LOOK FOR HPAC: Chair Scott had big props for artist Dina Lydia of digital-genie.com, who designed the new logo for the group (and took the photo below featuring the logo with, from left, Witzki, Scott, HPIC’s Christie Sjostrom, and Rankin):

HPAC will also be sending postcards to more than 2,000 people in the Highland Park area to let them know. They hope, among other things, to reduce community confusion between HPAC and HPIC (which is a community group too but not a community council – as the latter, HPAC addresses issues and takes action on them).

EVENTS AHEAD: HPAC hopes to have a neighborhood cleanup/barbecue this summer … HPIC events ahead include Corner Bar on April 7, Art Lounge on April 14, and the annual Uncorked benefit on May 20th – tickets will go on sale April 7th … watch for more info at hpic1919.org.

Highland Park Action Committee meets fourth Wednesdays most months, 7 pm, at Highland Park Improvement Club (12th/Holden).

PHOTOS: Fauntleroy Community Association grows, and celebrates, at annual Food Fest

Electing a board for the year ahead is part of what happens at the Fauntleroy Community Association‘s annual meeting. So the board gathered for our photo last night (the list is at our story’s end). The event had a triple-digit turnout, in part because of its other identity – the annual Food Fest, with samples from local providers. Ahead, photos from the night: Read More

TUESDAY: Junction Neighborhood Organization talks HALA, RPZ, Fauntleroy Boulevard, more

What’s up with the HALA Mandatory Housing Affordability rezoning proposal right now – besides doorhangers in urban villages? That’s one of the topics set for tomorrow night’s Junction Neighborhood Organization meeting, 6:30 pm at the Senior Center/Sisson Building (4217 SW Oregon). JuNO director René Commons says other topics will include an update on the SDOT review of a Restricted Parking Zone application filed by a Junction resident, as well as updates on the Fauntleroy Boulevard project (now that the walking tours are past), a “Greenspace Park/Library/Community Center Plan for the West Seattle Junction,” and the future of the Avalon Substation site.

@ Fauntleroy Community Association: Food Fest on Tuesday; SDOT says no to RPZ change; other updates

The Fauntleroy Community Association‘s annual membership meeting – known as the Food Fest because of samples from local businesses – is Tuesday, and this week’s FCA board meeting brought lots of news ahead of it.

WHO’LL BE AT THE FOOD FEST: First, an update tonight from FCA president Mike Dey – Mayor Ed Murray and City Councilmember Lisa Herbold have confirmed they’ll attend. It starts at 6 pm Tuesday (March 21st) at The Hall at Fauntleroy (9131 California SW); free, but FCA invites members old and new to be ready to renew/join ($25/year).

DAYTIME RPZ REJECTED: Last fall, FCA asked SDOT to study parking in the existing Residential Parking Zone east of the Fauntleroy ferry terminal, where parking is currently restricted to permit holders between 2-5 am. The group’s concerns included Washington State Ferries employees parking in residential neighborhoods during the day and car-share vehicles. One week ago, SDOT replied to say its study found “not enough blocks meet the minimum threshold to make the requested changes to the existing RPZ.” Its letter said that they needed to find at least 10 blocks/20 blockfaces where parking was 75 percent occupied during their study; they found “approximately 6 blocks (7 blockfaces) that met the 75% threshold.” Read More

Which stops might stay, and which might go? See what Delridge District Council heard and said about RapidRide H Line concepts

By Tracy Record
West Seattle Blog editor

One huge question about the taking-shape plans for the Delridge RapidRide line was answered during this week’s briefing for the Delridge Neighborhoods District Council: Which stops are proposed for removal when Route 120 is turned into the H Line in 2020?

The list was in the slide deck brought to the DNDC meeting Wednesday night at Highland Park Improvement Club by SDOT’s Thérèse Casper and Dawn Schellenberg, two days after the project “online open house” went live (as reported here), asking for opinions about two potential concepts.

Their slide deck began with background including the plan to “upgrade” Route 120 to RapidRide, between downtown Seattle, Delridge, and Burien. It’ll be under construction in 2019 and in service in 2020, according to the current plan. Casper said the way had been paved by discussions in recent years regarding various transportation-related plans – the Delridge multi-modal corridor discussion, Freight Master Plan, Bicycle Master Plan, etc.

Along the Delridge section of the route, Casper said, conditions are as follows:

Read More

@ Admiral Neighborhood Association: Questions and observations

Though the scheduled guest from the Southwest Precinct was a last-minute scratch, Tuesday night’s Admiral Neighborhood Association meeting featured a lively discussion of questions for the group to consider, and observations about the city’s new open-to-all process for spending more than $2 million on community-proposed park/street projects. About 20 people were at The Sanctuary at Admiral to talk, listen, and consider: Read More

Live/work in Admiral? Join your neighborhood group’s conversation with police

March 11, 2017 11:03 am
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 |   Neighborhoods | West Seattle news | West Seattle police

(WSB photo from March 2016, ANA president Larry Wymer at left, CPT Officer Jon Flores at right)

Just in, the plan for next Tuesday night’s Admiral Neighborhood Association meeting. In the spotlight, your local Southwest Precinct Community Police Team officer. Here’s the announcement from ANA president Larry Wymer:

COMMUNITY POLICING UPDATE

7:00 pm Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Officer Jon Flores – Community Police Team (CPT) Officer with the Seattle Police Department – returns to update the neighborhood on the state of policing in Admiral, with an open Q&A session to listen to any of our concerns, and answer any questions we might have.

We will also address and discuss a number of issues of interest to Admiral, and some interesting suggestions for consideration, including:

Admiral Urban Village Upzone – Follow up community input including potentially a collective letter from ANA.
Expansion of ‘Sphere of Influence’ for Admiral neighborhood (as our Association recognizes it) towards the southeast (35th & 34th Streets).
Pedestrian Safety in Admiral – signage/flashing signage, painted or perhaps lighted crosswalks.
King County Chelan CSO (Combined Sewer Overflow) Control Project

The ANA meets at The Sanctuary at Admiral, at 2656 42nd Ave SW. Our monthly meetings are held the 2nd Tuesday of each month at 7:00 pm. Everyone is welcome to attend.

Here’s our coverage of the meeting a year ago which also spotlighted the CPT and local crime/safety.

FOLLOWUP: 211 ideas from West Seattle for ‘Your Voice, Your Choice’ – next, you can help review them!

That’s the clickable map the city has just made public as the first-ever “Your Voice, Your Choice” process heads into its next phase. As we first reported in January, this is what the city is trying this year for deciding how to spend what used to be the Neighborhood Park and Street Fund, grants of up to $90,000 for community-proposed, city-and-community-reviewed projects. The first phase, submitting ideas, has just wrapped up, and the map shows the ideas sent in from around the city. Clicking on any marker (use the “plus” sign at lower left to zoom in, and grab the map to pull up more of West Seattle) will show you the location and description of what’s proposed there (you can also access the map directly here). Project spokesperson Jenny Frankl tells WSB that 211 ideas were received from West Seattle – 178 online, and 33 via outreach meetings (at Stewart Manor, Westwood Heights, West Seattle High School, and Center School – the students contacted there were from West Seattle, Frankl notes). Citywide, the Department of Neighborhoods says, more than 900 ideas were submitted.

Now comes the second stage: Reviewing the ideas to figure out which ones should move on to the voting stage in June. If interested in helping with that, you’re invited to be part of the Project Development Team. The one for this area – District 1, West Seattle and South Park – has four meetings scheduled, but you don’t have to commit to all four. The first one is this Thursday, 5:30 pm, at Southwest Library (35th SW/SW Henderson); if you’re interested in being on the team, you’re asked to send in this quick online form.

WEST SEATTLE WEEKEND: Admiral Adopt-A-Street cleanup Saturday morning, with rewards!

March 2, 2017 2:02 pm
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 |   How to help | Neighborhoods | West Seattle news

If you can spare a few hours to start off your Saturday, there are rewards in this for you beyond knowing you’ve helped clean up your community: It’s the quarterly Admiral Neighborhood Association Adopt-A-Street cleanup, and volunteers are vital. Meet up outside Metropolitan Market (41st/42nd/Admiral; WSB sponsor) 8:45-9 am, then spend up to three hours cleaning up in the area, 9 am-noon. Treats and coffee are available, free, ahead of time, and you’ll be sent home with a sack lunch afterward. Tools and bags provided! Just show up.

Question/comment for your city councilmember? Lisa Herbold at WWRHAH Community Council next Tuesday

As announced at this month’s Westwood-Roxhill-Arbor Heights Community Council meeting (WSB coverage here), West Seattle/South Park City Councilmember Lisa Herbold will be the guest at March’s meeting, the just-released agenda confirms. All are welcome at the meeting, which is one week from tonight – Tuesday, March 7th, 6:15 pm at Southwest Library (35th SW/SW Henderson).

THURSDAY: See newest plan for Admiral’s biggest project before it goes to Design Review

(UPDATED TUESDAY WITH MEETING LOCATION)

ORIGINAL REPORT, MONDAY 8:47 PM: Instead of meeting on the usual night this month, which would be tomorrow, the Admiral Neighborhood Association plans a special meeting this Thursday (February 16th), 7 pm, with a special agenda – the first look at the newest plan for the biggest project currently in the works for the area. That’s the planned mixed-use project on the current PCC Natural Markets (WSB sponsor) site, with a new PCC store planned as the commercial tenant beneath more than 100 apartments. ANA president Larry Wymer says the meeting will also be at a special location – likely the classroom space at PCC (2749 California SW) – watch for location confirmation here in the next day or so. The project goes back to the Southwest Design Review Board on March 2nd, as first reported here last month, but first, the project team, led by Hewitt Architects, plans to present it to ANA and all interested community members, so save Thursday night.

UPDATE, TUESDAY AFTERNOON: The location for the meeting will be St. John the Baptist Church parish hall, 3050 California SW (across from PCC and just south of WSHS). Enter either from the church entrance on the north side, or from 42nd SW on the east side.

NEIGHBOR DAY: High Point event brings together neighbors from near and far

By Cliff Cawthon
Reporting for West Seattle Blog

Neighborhood House’s High Point Center is a place where neighbors gather almost every day of the year.

But Saturday afternoon had something extra – a Neighbor Day gathering with an emphasis on welcoming and celebrating the neighborhood’s immigrant communities amid the Trump Administration’s attempts at what’s being called the “Muslim Ban.”

“A lot of people who we work with could be affected by the immigrant ban,” explained Megan Demeroutis, Neighborhood House’s Family Resource Center supervisor. Demeroutis said that the potluck’s international flavor and the activities were meant to bring people together in the mixed-income Seattle Housing Authority– managed community. Read More

NEIGHBOR DAY: Connect with your neighbors @ West Seattle Office Junction

February 11, 2017 12:38 pm
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 |   Neighborhoods | West Seattle news | West Seattle people


(WSB photos)

Not only is West Seattle Office Junction (WSB sponsor) a place to cowork – it’s also a place to connect with your neighbors, especially today! Until 2 pm, in honor of Neighbor Day, several local groups/organizations have reps there to answer your questions – including West Seattle Time Bank, Plant for the Planet – Washington State, Urban Homestead Foundation, Terraganics Living, Seattle Farm School, West Seattle Bee Garden, West Seattle Food Bank, The Community General Store, and Backyard Barter.


(Office Junction co-proprietors Stefan and Christine)


(Kids’ activity table)

Stop in (6040 California SW), have a cup of coffee, and find out how to get more connected within the West Seattle community.

NEIGHBOR DAY: Fire-station tours in West Seattle

11:29 AM: Until 1 pm, you’re invited to a centerpiece of Neighbor Day – touring a local fire station. In West Seattle, two stations are open for tours, recently renovated Station 29 in Admiral (2139 Ferry SW) and relatively new Station 37 in Sunrise Heights (35th SW/SW Holden). As our photo (taken a few minutes ago at Station 37) shows, all ages are welcome – it’s your annual chance to meet local firefighters outside times of emergency! (Other Neighbor Day events are in today’s West Seattle Saturday highlights list.)

2:16 PM: Two more photos added – above, neighbors getting a closer look at Engine 37; below, a REALLY close-up look for some:

You might just get another chance for a fire-station tour this year – we’ll be watching for completion of the new Station 32 in The Triangle.

@ Westwood-Roxhill-Arbor Heights Community Council: HALA, crime/safety, cooking…

February 8, 2017 8:49 pm
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 |   Arbor Heights | Neighborhoods | West Seattle news | Westwood

Tuesday night was not much of a night for meeting-going, with slush and ice still on the roads, but hardy executive-board members Amanda Kay Helmick, Eric Iwamoto, and Kim Barnes were at the Southwest Library for February’s meeting of the Westwood-Roxhill-Arbor Heights Community Council, as were guests Lt. Ron Smith of the Southwest Precinct and Jordan Lowe from startup Josephine.com. Over the course of an hour, here are the toplines of what they talked about:

SOUTHWEST PRECINCT UPDATES: Lt. Smith said the Parks Department was cutting more vegetation by the Roxhill Park bus stop earlier in the day, to increase visibility to reduce crime and other problems. (Helmick mentioned that Metro is getting close to permits for the long-requested lighting alongside the park and is now projecting installation in March.) Businesses in the area are contacting police more often about problems. Then, area crime stats – “a huge increase in vehicle thefts” lately, especially Arbor Heights, Lt. Smith said. Six more than the area had seen by this time last year. But they’ve been making arrests, too. And car prowls are down, as are residential burglaries and robberies. So far this year, there’s been one non-residential burglary in the area, compared to none last year.

HALA REZONING: Barnes has been birddogging this and says that because turnout was low for November’s little-publicized Housing Affordability and Livability Agenda-related Community Design Workshop for the Westwood-Highland Park Urban Village meeting was so anemic, the city Office of Planning and Community Development has offered to have another meeting for this area. It’ll be March 1st at Highland Park Improvement Club, start time TBA. They’ll go over notes from the November meeting and get into more details about how to provide community feedback on the proposed rezoning.

JOSEPHINE.COM: Jordan Lowe from Mount Baker was an invited guest to talk about this startup, which “allows home cooks to sell food to their neighbors.” He is one of those cooks and said he uses it as supplementary income. “I pick what I want to cook, how much I want to charge, put it on the website, people come and pick it up. … Over the last couple months we’ve been growing a lot in Seattle.” All cooks need to have a food handler’s permit, he said, and the company pays for it if necessary; they also check out the cooks’ kitchens. He went into some of the details. So far, West Seattle has “three or four people” who are going through the application process. Yes, there’s a catch – “we operate in a gray area,” as Lowe put it when we asked – the meals have to technically be considered “events” by health authorities rather than people making and selling food for purchase. The company started in California and expanded to Portland and Seattle.

NEXT WWRHAH MEETING: Councilmember Lisa Herbold is scheduled to be at the March WWRHAH meeting. The discussion of the group’s direction also has been moved to that meeting (6:15 pm, Tuesday, March 7th, Southwest Library, 35th SW/SW Henderson).

MEET YOUR FIREFIGHTERS: Fire Station tours in West Seattle on Neighbor Day

February 3, 2017 2:20 pm
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 |   Neighborhoods | West Seattle news

thechief
(WSB photo from Station 37 tour in February 2016)

One week from tomorrow, it’s Neighbor Day in Seattle – and the long list of events includes your chance to visit and tour two of West Seattle’s fire stations. From 11 am to 1 pm on Saturday, February 11th, you’re welcome to visit Station 29 in Admiral (2139 Ferry SW) and Station 37 in Sunrise Heights (7700 35th SW). The full citywide list of stations open for tours that day is here.

HALA REZONING: Add two months to the timeline for your feedback

IMG_8413
(Comments written on draft rezoning map at last week’s Junction ‘Community Design Workshop’)

One week after the standing-room-only meeting in The Junction, there’s a new development today in the proposed citywide rezoning that’s a big component of the city’s Housing Affordability and Livability Agenda (HALA): The timeline for the Mandatory Housing Affordability rezoning has just expanded by two months, so you have more time to get up to speed and get your comments in. The Junction Neighborhood Organization got first word from City Councilmember Lisa Herbold that the Office of Planning and Community Development

… is amending the schedule for release of the draft EIS [Environmental Impact Statement] and now it is anticipated to come out in May. This will give the community an additional two months to provide feedback. The Department of Neighborhoods plans to door knock all of the single-family homes that are part of the potential upzones. DON and OPCD will conduct another series of conversations in May and June.

The new May timeline for the draft EIS – which will open another comment period – is five months later than the end-of-2016 projection in the “scoping” for that document (see it here) was done. The draft and final EIS will have to be done before a final rezoning proposal can go to the City Council for a vote.

Meantime, the Admiral Residential Urban Village version of last week’s Junction meeting is still to come – 9:30 am Saturday, February 11th, at West Seattle High School. No date/time announced yet for the Morgan Junction version. You can still comment online, via hala.consider.it and/or e-mailing halainfo@seattle.gov.

Whatever area you live in, if you still don’t know whether you are directly affected by the HALA proposal, find your neighborhood on this interactive map. While most of the proposed rezoning is for those within “urban village” boundaries (West Seattle has four – The Junction, Morgan Junction, Admiral, and Westwood-Highland Park), there are some proposals for expanding those boundaries, and all commercial/multifamily property is proposed for rezoning, even outside urban villages.

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