Environment 1212 results

TERMINAL 5 MODERNIZATION: Port announces final environmental-impact statement, with ‘preferred alternative’

(UPDATED 11:35 AM with “what’s next” now that this is public)

(January 2015 photo of Terminal 5 by Long Bach Nguyen)

10:23 AM: Just announced by the port: It’s finished the final environmental-impact statement for the proposed $200+-million modernization of Terminal 5 in West Seattle. We haven’t read the fine print yet but the news release says some community requests are addressed – including shore power so ships aren’t running don’t have to run their engines while docked:

The Port of Seattle has completed the environmental analysis of Terminal 5 and has prepared the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) on the project to modernize the cargo-handling facility in order to serve larger cargo vessels. The proposed upgrades to Terminal 5 are wharf rehabilitation, berth deepening, electrical service and improvements to the upland portions of the property.

“Based on public comment we are including a number of improvements, such as shore power for vessels, installing gates for noise and safety mitigation for rail, and significant traffic improvement measures,” said John Creighton, Port of Seattle Commission president and co-chair of The Northwest Seaport Alliance. “We want to thank the public for weighing in on this proposal during the comment period.”

“With this Final Environmental Impact Statement for Terminal 5, we are one step closer to making this prime maritime asset ‘Big Ship Ready’ and able to handle the largest container vessels working the market today,” said Connie Bacon, Port of Tacoma Commission president and co-chair of The Northwest Seaport Alliance. “This region needs this terminal to remain competitive in today’s global economy.”

Mitigation measures for the project include construction of plug-in capability for shore power at two berths, tracking of air quality performance, establishment of a safety corridor between the Terminal 5 gate and the Duwamish river in order to minimize the need to use locomotive horns, required use of ambient-sensing broadband back up alarms, implementation of a Gate Queue Management plan, establishing a truck driver information system, comprehensive traffic signal improvements along SW Spokane Street and an operation noise management plan to ensure and monitor compliance with the Seattle noise code.

The FEIS evaluated potential impacts to earth, air, water, plants, animals, energy and natural resources, environmental health, noise, aesthetics (including light and glare), historic and cultural resources, transportation and public services. The Port of Seattle Commission must approve the recommended improvements in public session.

Copies of the FEIS are available for review at the Seattle Central Library, Delridge Library, Southwest Library, Highpoint Library, South Park Library, and West Seattle Library. Copies are also available at the Port of Seattle, Maritime Environment and Sustainability Department, Pier 69, 2711 Alaskan Way, Seattle, Washington, during business hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

People interested in receiving a copy of the FEIS should contact Brenda Thomas at 206-787-3382 or email at: SEPA.p@portseattle.org. The FEIS can also be reviewed and downloaded at the Port of Seattle website and at the Terminal 5 Improvements Project Online Open House.

The entire environmental review followed community concerns, including a petition drive, that followed the port’s original announcement that it didn’t believe a full-scale environmental impact statement would be needed. The purpose of the EIS (direct link here – use dropdown under “Current Projects”) is for use by agencies making decisions about permits for the project, which the port says is expected to be complete by 2020.

11:35 AM: We talked with port spokesperson Peter McGraw regarding “what’s next” now that this is out. For one, there is an appeals process – deadline, November 1st. That’s explained here, on the “Next Steps” page of the “online open house.” And, McGraw points out, a big part of the final EIS is the announcement of the port’s “preferred alternative” – it’s the one that does NOT include “upland improvements” beyond T-5’s existing footprint.

Share This

Here’s where in West Seattle you can be part of Duwamish Alive!

(WSB file photo from a past Duwamish Alive! event)

If this isn’t already on your calendar – the Duwamish River will benefit from just a few hours of your time next Saturday (October 22nd). Five sites along the river and in its watershed are in need of volunteers for the fall edition of Duwamish Alive!, 9:30 am-2 pm on Saturday. It’s one of the two days each year when hundreds of people volunteer to help our area’s only river. Here’s how:

Join our community effort to restore native habitat within the Duwamish Watershed on Saturday, October 22nd, while celebrating the connection of our urban forests to our river and salmon. Starting at 10:00 am volunteers will gear up at multiple Duwamish sites including one of our largest urban forests – the West Duwamish Greenbelt – to participate in planting and removing invasive weeds in an effort to keep our river alive and healthy for our communities, salmon and the Puget Sound. Volunteers are still needed at:

Pigeon Point Park
Roxhill Bog, headwaters of Longfellow Creek
Delridge Wetlands, tributary of Longfellow Creek
Longfellow Creek at Greg Davis Park
Herring’s House Park, along the river

(outside West Seattle) Hamm Creek/Duwamish Substation, along the river

To volunteer, visit DuwamishAlive.org to see the different volunteer opportunities and RSVP to the contact for the site of your choice, or email info@duwamishalive.org

Other work sites include a river cleanup by kayak, shoreline salmon habitat restoration, and native forest revitalization while enjoying our autumn. Families, company groups, clubs, individuals, schools, community organizations, are encouraged to participate, and no experience is necessary.

The workday at all 15 sites begins at 9:30 with volunteer sign-in and concludes at 2 PM. Refreshments, tools, and instructions will be provided. All ages and abilities welcomed.

VIDEO: What happened when Diver Laura went live where the stormwater goes

One more video from our semi-stormy Saturday: If you missed “Diver Laura” James‘s live dive to the stormwater outfall in Cove 1 near Seacrest – here’s the video. She was streaming live via Periscope, hoping for a live look at the mesmerizing and sometimes horrifying sight of polluted stormwater runoff emerging into Puget Sound, but the rain chose that exact time for a break. There were still sights to see, and she’s added captioning for the narration recorded. You’ll also see good reasons not to ignore litter you might spot on the street – and some wildlife, too.

Ex-substation contaminated and due for demolition, to neighbors’ surprise

(WSB photos)

By Tracy Record
West Seattle Blog editor

Neighbors of the former Avalon substation building by the southwest end of the West Seattle Bridge say they were surprised to find out, after years of living nearby, that it is contaminated with mercury and set for demolition.

Wednesday afternoon, they gathered with Seattle City Light and Department of Construction and Inspections reps and City Councilmember Lisa Herbold to try to clarify what happened and what’s planned for the site after the building is torn down and the contamination cleanup. Read More

SAVED: Fauntleroy Creek Salmon in the Schools program will swim on

(WSB photo, May 2016: West Seattle Elementary group at Fauntleroy Creek with volunteer Dennis Hinton)

By Dennis Hinton, Fauntleroy Creek volunteer
Special to West Seattle Blog

After months of not knowing if the Fauntleroy Creek Salmon in the Schools program would continue uninterrupted as it has for more than 20 years, word came late last week that it will.

The program centers on coho fry released by schoolchildren. Ten elementary schools and three preschools in West Seattle receive coho eggs in January and students rear the fish while learning about biology, habitat, and the role of salmon in Pacific Northwest environment, commerce, and culture. Nearly 800 students came to the creek this past spring on release field trips, bringing 1,800 coho fry.

For the first time since 1991 when it started Salmon in the Schools, the state Department of Fish and Wildlife notified program coordinators six months ago that coho eggs might not be available for the 2016-17 term. Without them, participating West Seattle schools would have had to rear another salmon species for release elsewhere.

(WSB photo: Judy Pickens at Westside School on egg-delivery day last January)

“This news from the state was chilling to both teachers and creek volunteers,” said Judy Pickens. She and Phil Sweetland represent Fauntleroy Creek on the Salmon in the Schools – Seattle steering committee that coordinates the program for 71 schools in the city. “Without coho, the creek would have lost much of the life we’ve been working for 26 years to restore and the community would have lost a much-loved natural feature, a small taste of the wild in urban West Seattle.”

The state based its warning on last year’s meager return of coho spawners to Puget Sound and predictions of a low coho return this year. Warm water off the Oregon-Washington coast killed their prey and, without food, the fish that had survived predation and pollution to get that far died. No spawners came into Fauntleroy Creek last fall.

Based on early coho returns to area hatcheries, creek volunteers are cautiously optimistic about getting spawners this year. The annual drumming to call them in will be Sunday, October 30, at 5 pm at the fish-ladder viewpoint (SW Director and upper Fauntleroy Way SW).

Volunteers will start watching for spawners the following week when tides are high enough for the fish to have easy access to the mouth of the creek. Assuming veteran watchers spot fish, watch here for an invitation to join their ranks.

Why High Point Pond is more like a wetland right now

High Point Pond – the size of a small lake – is more like a wetland, temporarily, after its first draining in two years.


A concerned reader tipped us via e-mail, worried about the fish in the pond, so we went over to check it out, and then sought out information via the High Point Open Spaces Association, which maintains the pond as part of an agreement with Seattle Public Utilities. Community Association Manager Janell Gonyea explained:

The OSA grounds crew drains the pond periodically to inspect all of the components in the pond to determine if any maintenance is necessary. We check the inlet and outlet lines to make sure they are clear and we check the pond liner to see if it is exposed or not. We also check to see if there are invasive plant species that could alter or damage the pond liner. We check the emergency risers to make sure they are operating correctly and we inspect for sediment build up in the pond. We also inspect the re-circulation pump and will conduct routine maintenance on that.

The last time we drained the pond was in 2014 and at that time, everything was in good condition. We do not anticipate any problems with the pond at this time because it has been performing normally, but we do want to be proactive about examining the pond and its components to make sure that there is no maintenance needed. The fish will not be affected because there will be enough water left in the pond for the fish. The pond will begin refilling naturally. The weather report is calling for rain later this week, so the pond will begin filling with that rainfall and storm water.

Thanks also to the OSA’s Deborah Vandermar for pointing us to this info. The pond is part of the Natural Drainage Systems built into the High Point redevelopment a decade ago.

P.S. For a wider look at the drained pond, here’s our Instagram clip from this morning:

P.S. If you’re not familiar with the pond’s location – here’s a map.

VIDEO: New 360-degree view of ‘Alki Junkyard’

New from “Diver Laura” James – a 360-degree view of what divers know as the “Alki Junkyard,” off the west end of public Alki shoreline (64th SW).

Laura says, “This was shot with ambient light in the 50’ range; the only lights were on my dive buddy Lamont’s camera. So you can see it’s really quite bright down there during the day (lots of ambient light unless a really heavy plankton bloom), and the diver lights primarily serve to restore the colors (red goes away first, due to the way water absorbs light).”

If you haven’t viewed this type of video before – provided it’s compatible with your browser, you should be able to click “play” and then click the video, using your cursor to “drag” it around, to see above, below, in front, behind … 360 degrees.

P.S. If you follow Diver Laura on Twitter/Periscope, you just might catch her “live” underwater – she’s done a few tests in the past few days.

Fauntleroy Church Recycle Roundup: Sunday’s results, and 2017 dates

September 27, 2016 12:31 pm
|    Comments Off on Fauntleroy Church Recycle Roundup: Sunday’s results, and 2017 dates
 |   Environment | Fauntleroy | West Seattle news

(WSB photo from midway through last Sunday’s Recycle Roundup)

Another big harvest for the fall edition of the Recycle Roundup free-dropoff event in Fauntleroy this past Sunday. Judy Pickens has the numbers, and the dates for next year:

Sunday’s fall recycle roundup at Fauntleroy Church brought in 9.25 tons for responsible recycling. The crew from 1 Green Planet unloaded just over 400 vehicles. The church’s green committee will host the 2017 roundups on Sunday, April 23, and Sunday, September 24.

When April gets closer, we’ll remind you, of course, especially once the “what will and won’t be accepted” list comes in.

HAPPENING NOW: Fauntleroy ‘Recycle Roundup,’ until 3 pm


Just stopped by Fauntleroy Church to see how the fall Recycle Roundup is going. You have until 3 pm to drop off recyclables for free – provided they’re on this (long) list of what 1 Green Planet is taking this time. Most memorable item we spotted during a quick look – a vintage copper “Combination” GE refrigerator/freezer.


The church is at 9140 California SW (you can’t get there directly from the main stretch of California – if you head west on Barton from 35th, the road becomes California for a short stretch before the Endolyne business district). It’s busy right now (a few minutes past noon) but they have enough help to keep everyone moving through quickly.

YOU CAN HELP! Volunteer to survey Longfellow Creek salmon with Puget Soundkeeper Alliance

(WSB photo – Longfellow Creek during fall 2014 salmon survey)

Help survey coho salmon returning to Longfellow Creek in West Seattle! Puget Soundkeeper Alliance is looking again this fall for dedicated volunteers. Here’s their announcement:

During the salmon run each fall, a population of coho salmon enters the Duwamish River from Elliott Bay, and then swims up Longfellow Creek to spawn. As coho migrate through urbanized waterways like Longfellow, they encounter a chemical cocktail of toxic runoff from roadways and other paved surfaces. These chemicals severely disorient adult coho and result in “pre-spawn mortality” in many individuals, meaning the salmon die before reproducing.

Previous surveys conducted by the City of Seattle and NOAA on Longfellow Creek have found pre-spawn mortality rates of up to 90% amongst females, an alarmingly high statistic. Examining the number of salmon that return to Longfellow Creek every year and documenting the pre-spawn mortality rate are great indicators of the health of our local waterways. Data gathered from these surveys shared with NOAA, the City of Seattle, Department of Fish and Wildlife and King County.

Volunteers will attend an orientation meeting on Tuesday, October 4th from 6:30-8:30 pm at Chaco Canyon Organic Café in West Seattle.


The nature of this work is geared toward adults only.

Surveying is a weekly commitment that takes approximately 1 hour to complete. The salmon run begins in mid-October and finishes mid-December, during which there will be a survey every day. Volunteers will be divided into teams of 2-3 people and assigned a weekday to conduct their survey.

We’re looking for adventurous volunteers! Surveying requires handling fish carcasses found in the creek (with gloves) and dissecting the female salmon to check for eggs.

Volunteers should be in good physical condition. Surveying in Longfellow Creek requires climbing up and down steep muddy embankments and wading through shallow water on uneven terrain.

Surveying is conducted in varying weather conditions. If conditions are dangerous (e.g. a downpour), we will cancel on that day. Otherwise, we survey rain or shine.

Volunteers will be provided with surveying kits and waders (unless you have your own pair). Data collected during the survey will be uploaded by the volunteers into Puget Soundkeeper’s database.

Salmon surveys are a great way to observe one of nature’s most amazing migrations and experience scientific field work. The data we collect from these surveys help us understand the effects of toxic runoff on one of the Pacific Northwest’s most iconic species and determine the best methods to protect them in the future!

Qustions? kerry@pugetsoundkeeper.org – and when you’re ready to register, go here.

FOLLOWUP: Revisiting East Admiral illegal-tree-cutting site

After Tuesday’s news of city lawsuits in the case of illegal tree-cutting on public land in East Admiral, some asked what the site looks like now. We don’t have September 2015 photos for a true comparison, so keep in mind that any area with deciduous trees will look dramatically different between the end of winter and the end of summer. But here are the closest “now and then” shots:


Above is our Wednesday afternoon view looking west/upslope after walking into the city land north of CityView/34th SW. You can barely pick out the tops of a couple of the residences (note the chimney) clearly visible in our March photo taken from that same trail:

(March WSB photo)

Looking the other way, this time, to the east:


That was the Wednesday afternoon view from an angle similar to, but from a higher perspective than, this one photographed in March:

(March 2016 WSB photo by Christopher Boffoli)

Note that our photos involve what the city calls “Area C,” which is the subject of the “southern site” lawsuit against Kostas and Linda Kyrimis and “John and Jane Does.” The “northern site” lawsuit involves “Area A,” which is much less accessible, aside from a view looking downslope from the 35th SW street end, which is where we took this photo Tuesday afternoon:

(We haven’t found a photo with a March view from that spot.) Here’s the graphic from the lawsuit documentation, showing where Areas A and C are:


Meantime, we are watching court files to see what tentative scheduling will be set for these cases to proceed in court.

ADDED THURSDAY AFTERNOON: We did obtain the case numbers for the lawsuits today, and the online files verify that for starters, as with most if not all civil cases, these have tentative trial dates that are a year away. Along the way, however, motions and hearings pop up, and that’s what we’ll be watching for.

UPDATE: Lawsuits filed in illegal West Seattle tree-cutting; criminal prosecution still possible, City Attorney says

(UPDATED 4:45 PM with comment from lawyer for two of the people the city is suing)

(April WSB photo – south end of area where trees were cut)

12:04 PM: Last week, City Councilmember Lisa Herbold told the 34th District Democrats that she’d learned the City Attorney’s Office would have something to say this week about last winter’s illegal tree-cutting in West Seattle’s Duwamish Head Greenbelt.

Here it is:

The Seattle Times just broke the news that the city has filed lawsuits “seeking more than $1.6 million in combined damages and fines.”

We’re following up with the City Attorney’s Office and checking court files.

12:15 PM: We’ve obtained City Attorney Pete Holmes‘s statement from his office:

City Attorney Pete Holmes: “Earlier this year, the City learned of unpermitted improper tree cutting on City property in West Seattle near the 3200 block of 35th Ave. SW. Today, the City filed two lawsuits, naming people the City believes were involved in the tree cutting. The property is in an environmentally critical area on a steep slope. Approximately 150 trees of varying sizes, including many big-leaf maples and Scouler’s willows, were felled.

“My office has been involved in the City’s response. We launched an investigation to assess the extent of damage and identify the responsible parties. To that end, we retained a consulting arborist to assess the damage and prepare a comprehensive restoration plan.

“No one has yet come forward to give the City the full story of what happened despite SPD’s best efforts and extensive investigation. However, we are satisfied that we now know enough to proceed with civil lawsuits. We expect to learn that additional people, beyond those named in the lawsuits, were involved with the cutting as the suits progress. Between the lawsuits, the City seeks over $1.6 million in damages and fines. The City seeks relief on several grounds, including timber trespass, damage to land, trespass, negligence, environmentally critical areas violations, violations of the parks code and violations of the city’s tree and vegetation management in public places code.

“On its damages theories, the City generally alleges that the defendants and/or their agents cut down trees on City property without permission when they should have known better. The extensive tree cutting damaged the trees and the underlying land. On its code violation theories, because the cutting took place on City property and some occurred in City right of way, the cutters or their employers were required to obtain a number of permits before they cut any trees. No permits were issued to authorize the cutting and penalties and fines are therefore appropriate.

“The SPD criminal investigation of this matter is ongoing, and it is possible that SPD will refer this matter to the King County Prosecutor or my office in the future for potential criminal prosecution.”

We also have the court documents and are going through them for additional details. More to come …

12:27 PM: Two suits are filed. The first one, involving “the northern site” (off 35th), names Stanley Harrelson and Mary Harrelson, who are residents next to one of the cut zones, and Martin Riemer and Karrie Riemer, who live across the street to the east from the Harrelsons. That suit also names Forrest Bishop and John Russo, who the city alleges “were hired by the Harrelsons and Riemers to cut trees on city property located adjacent and/or across from (theirs).” The same suit also names “Defendants John and Jane Does 1-10 (who) may have retained Bishop, Russo, or others to cut trees on (two city parcels) or may themselves have cut trees on those parcels.”

(added) This suit alleges that “55 trees 6 inches in caliper or greater were cut down on the Parcels in Exhibit 1 Area A (which) are located in an environmentally critical area that contains steep slopes and landslide-prone areas. None of Defendants sought permission from any City department to cut trees on the Parcels. The cutting of trees increased the likelihood of landslides on the Parcels, and thereby damaged the land itself.” It alleges six “causes of action”:

*Timber trespass
*Damage to land
*Violations of the Environmentally Critical Areas Code
*Unauthorized use of park property

The damages sought in this suit are listed as:

… a principal judgment against Defendants, jointly and severally, including treble damages of $678,180 on the City’s timber trespass claim or in such other amount as may be proven at trial; penalties in the amount of $275,000 for cutting down 55 trees of six inches or more in diameter and an additional $500 for each tree cut …

… as well as other costs including legal fees and “enforcement costs.”

The suit involving “the southern site” (off City View) names Kostas Kyrimis and Linda Kyrimis, as well as “defendants Jane and John Does 1-14 (who) resided at and owned property within a two-block radius of the intersection of 35th Ave SW and SW Hinds Street and had views that were previously impaired by trees … (and) Defendants Jane and John Does 15-20 (who) were hired by the Kyrimises and/or Jane and John Does 1-14 to cut trees on property owned by the City …”

(added) This suit alleges that “72 trees over 6 inches in caliper” were cut in the area involved and makes the same allegations as the other suit, that no permission was sought, and that damage included the increased likelihood of landslides on the steep slopes.

Along with the same six “causes” as the northern-area lawsuit (listed above), this one adds a seventh:

*Tree and vegetation management in public places

And the damages sought in this suit, along with various costs such as enforcement and attorneys’ fees:

… A principal judgment against Defendants, jointly and severally, including treble damages of $362,760 on the City’s timber trespass claim or in such other amount as may be proven at trial; penalties in the amount of $360,000 for cutting down 72 trees over six inches in caliper and an additional $500 for each tree cut pursuant to SMC 25.09.460.A; land restoration costs …

We’ll add any comment we get from those targeted in these two lawsuits.

1:32 PM: Councilmember Herbold’s statement:

“I thank the City Attorney’s Office for filing two civil lawsuits this morning to address the illegal cutting of 150 trees in West Seattle earlier this year. I appreciate the use of a full range of the legal remedies available for civil suits, including timber trespass, which allows for 3x damages.

“The $1.6 million total in damages and fines sought by the City speaks to the seriousness of the claims. The damages and penalties must be significant enough to deter this kind of activity in the future, so that those with financial means don’t see unauthorized tree cutting as a cost-effective way to increase their views and property values.

“These trees played an important role in maintaining soil stability in an environmentally critical area, and lessened the risk of landslides onto a major arterial, SW Admiral Way. They also helped maintain air quality by absorbing carbon—an important issue in West Seattle, which sits adjacent to SODO and the Duwamish industrial area.

“I understand the Seattle Police Department’s criminal investigation is ongoing. My hope is that the Department will eventually be able to establish probable cause for pursuing criminal charges. However, I appreciate the difficulty they face, given that persons believed to be involved are declining to cooperate with investigators, and the legal standard needed to establish probable cause for criminal charges and to prove those charges beyond a reasonable doubt.”

ADDED 4:45 PM: Just received a statement from Clayton Graham, lawyer for two of the people the city is suing:

We are disappointed by the City Attorney’s decision to file the lawsuit today. Our clients, Stan and Mary Harrelson, deeply regret the tree cutting which happened next to their property. At no point did our clients request, or condone, the extent of the work that was done by the contractor.

The Harrelsons have acknowledged their role in this mistake but the City has been non-responsive to our attempts to reach a settlement in this matter. We believe the damages sought in the suit are excessive, given our clients’ limited role in the cutting that took place. While the lawsuit claims that none of the homeowners has come forward with the full story, our clients have fully cooperated with the City’s efforts since they, themselves, disclosed this work to the City early this year, and hired a former City of Seattle arborist to develop a restoration plan. The Harrelsons remain ready and willing to work with the City to remedy this matter.

We had published a statement from Graham in this March 28th story on behalf of his then-unidentified clients, saying they and also-then-unidentified neighbors had “hired a landscaping business to top and prune some trees to improve the view from their respective residences” and that his clients had come back from a trip to find out the landscapers had gone beyond their mandate.

COUNTDOWN: Recycle Roundup this Sunday @ Fauntleroy Church

Thanks to Judy Pickens for the file photo and reminder: You have five days to get your recyclables ready to drop off at Fauntleroy Church:

The fall Recycle Roundup at Fauntleroy Church is this coming Sunday, September 25, 9 am to 3 pm in the church parking lot (9140 California SW). The list of what you can bring for responsible recycling (and what not) is here. Plan to avoid coming at the last hour, else you may have to wait several minutes for the crew from 1 Green Planet to unload your recyclables. The twice-yearly event is free but the church’s Green Committee won’t turn down a donation.

Last spring’s RR brought in 11.5 tons of recyclables.

Not comfortable with composting? West Seattleite’s {POST}MODERN now available

(Photo courtesy {POST}MODERN)

Still struggling to be successful at the messy business of food-waste composting? Lots of different ways to make it work – and now, West Seattleite Glenn Geisendorfer has something you might want to try. After a few years in development, he and collaborator Gabe Goldman are going wide with their compostable compost bin. {POST}MODERN is on the shelf at West Seattle Thriftway (WSB sponsor). Geisendorfer says it’s “molded out of pulp made from recycled cardboard boxes, and designed with a vacuum-like seal to be extremely moisture- and odor-resistant.” The starter kit ($9.99) is a three-pack with an under-sink hanger, and you can buy refills (5 for $11.99). Once it’s full, just put the entire bin into your yard-waste container, or your backyard compost pile if you are a DIY composter. Provided what you put in isn’t too wet, you should be able to use it 4 or 5 times before composting it. Here’s the {POST}MODERN backstory; Geisendorfer is also partner in the West Seattle-headquartered design agency Platform.

ALSO TONIGHT: Community meeting for proposed Seattle City Light facility along Duwamish River

(Planned site of Technical Training Center)

Along with what we’ve already previewed, here’s one more event for tonight. While it is happening in South Park, Duwamish River advocates tell us this event is potentially of interest to everyone concerned about the river and its watershed. It’s a Seattle City Light community meeting tonight to talk about its planned Technical Training Center. The center, with classrooms and an outdoor training yard, would be on Hamm Creek, on the north side of SCL’s Duwamish Substation. The plan would include “wetland mitigation … with approximately 4 acres of habitats similar to historic conditions on the Lower Duwamish River,” as well as a walking trail. Tonight’s meeting is scheduled for 6:15-7:45 pm at the South Park Community Center (8319 8th Avenue S.).

If you can’t get to the meeting but are interested in commenting on the plan, SCL is taking comments through next Tuesday (September 20th) as part of its State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA)-related review. Those comments can be sent to Margaret Duncan, SEPA Coordinator, at margaret.duncan@seattle.gov or by postal mail at 700 5th Avenue, Suite 3200, Seattle 98104.

HAPPENING NOW: West Seattle Chamber of Commerce cleanup

(WSB photo)

Rather than go home and kick back after work, some members of the West Seattle Chamber of Commerce have hit the street.

(Laura Schneider from Meeples Games [WSB sponsor] & Katie Krause from Daystar)

They’re cleaning up trash along California SW, starting at SW Charlestown and heading south to The Junction, until 6:30 or so. You’re welcome to grab a bag and join them – look for the people in the bright-blue T-shirts, as shown in our photo.

SAVING SALMON: What you need to know about the ‘nearshore,’ and what experts say is needed to fix it


By Tracy Record
West Seattle Blog editor

Puget Sound’s boundless beauty might be its ultimate undoing.

But it’s not too far gone – yet.

That was the message heard by and shared among more than 100 people during a recent boat tour that used the Sound’s beauty as a backdrop for a message that grows increasingly urgent: Restore more of its nearshore.

That’s the part you might not even think twice about as you gaze at the spectacle of the water, sapphire under sunshine, silver under showers.

We hear a lot about the water itself – pollution we can reduce, like combined-sewer overflows and toxic runoff. But what’s next to the water matters too. The beach, or what’s replaced it; the bluffs; those comprise the nearshore. So does what’s on the beach, the rocks, the bluffs … NOAA Fisheries Service explains it, plainly, here.

Another term that mattered on the tour: WRIA 9 – a zone you’re in, but might not ever have heard mentioned.

WRIA stands for Water Resource Inventory Area. Zone 9 is the Duwamish-Green Watershed … as in, the Duwamish-Green River, which runs south from West Seattle.


With that area of focus, those who were aboard (listed here) included elected officials from South King County as well as representatives from advocacy groups, businesses, and government agencies.


The slate of speakers began with Jay Manning from the Puget Sound Partnership Leadership Council opened with the dire warning that you can’t judge Puget Sound by its beauty: Read More

ONE MONTH AWAY! Fauntleroy Church ‘Recycle Roundup’

August 24, 2016 4:30 pm
|    Comments Off on ONE MONTH AWAY! Fauntleroy Church ‘Recycle Roundup’
 |   Environment | Fauntleroy | West Seattle news

This is your early reminder: Start collecting your recyclables for the fall edition of the Fauntleroy Church Recycle Roundup. It’s a month away – 9 am-3 pm Sunday, September 25th. Courtesy of Judy Pickens, we have the latest list of which items they will and won’t be able to accept. If you haven’t participated before, it’s a free drive-up/ride-up/walk-up event in the church parking lot at 9140 California SW.

Two cans closer to a less-trashed Alki Beach

Remember our June story about Diana‘s quest for Metro to bring back a trash can at the 61st/Alki bus stop? A customer-service rep had told her it was pulled (years earlier, it turned out) for overuse and wouldn’t be replaced. Then the next day – a replacement, after all. Today, Diana tells us, she’s scored bins for the corner to the east:

She explained to us via e-mail, “So as not to overburden the Metro trash can (as was their concern), I asked Seattle Public Utilities if they could install both trash and recycling bins on the opposite corner of 61st. Surprisingly, they responded saying my request met all the requirements to do so. It took eight weeks, and I had almost given up hope, but they miraculously showed up yesterday.” She sent the photo as proof. So if you’re at the beach sometime soon and use those new cans, you know who to thank. (If you’re having a big party, though, consider bringing bag[s] so you can pack it out.)

‘No-discharge zone’ in Puget Sound? State asks feds to make it happen

The state has formally asked the federal government to declare Puget Sound – and some contingent waters including Lakes Union and Washington – a “no-discharge zone.” Right now, vessels can discharge sewage into the Sound in some situations; this proposal – which would be phased in over several years – would ban that. The Department of Ecology‘s news release has details; this DOE page explains the process, now that the state has officially petitioned the EPA.

Save Puget Sound & save money: Free workshop for you and your car!

Just got word from Seattle Public Utilities that there’s room at this FREE event one week from Saturday at South Seattle College (WSB sponsor):

Oil and other automotive fluid leaks reduce the life of your engine and find their way to Puget Sound and other waterways where they pose a risk to wildlife and habitats. Seattle Public Utilities’ Automotive Maintenance Program wants to help you make sound choices.

Attend a FREE Auto Leaks Workshop to have your car inspected by a certified expert, learn how to find and fix leaks, and get a free Vehicle Maintenance Check Kit.

Upcoming class:
Saturday, July 23, 9 am-1 pm

To register go to www.seattle.gov/util/autoleaks

If you can’t make that date – check out a couple more (same link) later this year.

Time’s running out: Terminal 5 comment deadline Friday afternoon

(WSB file photo of Terminal 5)

If you have something to say about the proposed “modernization” project at West Seattle’s Terminal 5 – especially something you hope the project will include, in response to environmental factors including traffic, noise, water quality, air quality – you’re running out of time to say it during this round of planning. You might recall that the comment period for the Draft Environmental Impact Statement was extended, by community request, after last month’s public hearings; the new deadline is just two days away – 4 pm Friday, July 8th. Information that might help:

Official Port links:

The “online public meeting”
Volume 1 of the Draft EIS document (13 MB PDF)
Volume 2 of the Draft EIS document (65 MB PDF)

Other links of potential interest:

WSB coverage of the first community meeting on June 5th
WSB coverage of the second community meeting on June 9th
WSB coverage of T-5 discussion at West Seattle Transportation Coalition in May
WSB coverage of official DEIS release announcement in May
Neighbors’ concerns/petition

So, you know what you want to say, but want to know how to say it? Here’s how to comment, from the Port website:

The comment period will end at 4 p.m., July 8. Comments can be submitted online at t5eis.publicmeeting.info and via email at SEPA.p@portseattle.org.

Written comments can be mailed to:

Paul Meyer (Email: meyer.p@portseattle.org)
Environmental Services
Port of Seattle
P.O. Box 1209
Seattle, WA 98111

WP-Backgrounds by InoPlugs Web Design and Juwelier Schönmann