Environment 1193 results

‘No-discharge zone’ in Puget Sound? State asks feds to make it happen

The state has formally asked the federal government to declare Puget Sound – and some contingent waters including Lakes Union and Washington – a “no-discharge zone.” Right now, vessels can discharge sewage into the Sound in some situations; this proposal – which would be phased in over several years – would ban that. The Department of Ecology‘s news release has details; this DOE page explains the process, now that the state has officially petitioned the EPA.

Share This

Save Puget Sound & save money: Free workshop for you and your car!

Just got word from Seattle Public Utilities that there’s room at this FREE event one week from Saturday at South Seattle College (WSB sponsor):

Oil and other automotive fluid leaks reduce the life of your engine and find their way to Puget Sound and other waterways where they pose a risk to wildlife and habitats. Seattle Public Utilities’ Automotive Maintenance Program wants to help you make sound choices.

Attend a FREE Auto Leaks Workshop to have your car inspected by a certified expert, learn how to find and fix leaks, and get a free Vehicle Maintenance Check Kit.

Upcoming class:
Saturday, July 23, 9 am-1 pm

To register go to www.seattle.gov/util/autoleaks

If you can’t make that date – check out a couple more (same link) later this year.

Time’s running out: Terminal 5 comment deadline Friday afternoon

(WSB file photo of Terminal 5)

If you have something to say about the proposed “modernization” project at West Seattle’s Terminal 5 – especially something you hope the project will include, in response to environmental factors including traffic, noise, water quality, air quality – you’re running out of time to say it during this round of planning. You might recall that the comment period for the Draft Environmental Impact Statement was extended, by community request, after last month’s public hearings; the new deadline is just two days away – 4 pm Friday, July 8th. Information that might help:

Official Port links:

The “online public meeting”
Volume 1 of the Draft EIS document (13 MB PDF)
Volume 2 of the Draft EIS document (65 MB PDF)

Other links of potential interest:

WSB coverage of the first community meeting on June 5th
WSB coverage of the second community meeting on June 9th
WSB coverage of T-5 discussion at West Seattle Transportation Coalition in May
WSB coverage of official DEIS release announcement in May
Neighbors’ concerns/petition

So, you know what you want to say, but want to know how to say it? Here’s how to comment, from the Port website:

The comment period will end at 4 p.m., July 8. Comments can be submitted online at t5eis.publicmeeting.info and via email at SEPA.p@portseattle.org.

Written comments can be mailed to:

Paul Meyer (Email: meyer.p@portseattle.org)
Environmental Services
Port of Seattle
P.O. Box 1209
Seattle, WA 98111

Beacon Hill International School students’ TLC for Alki Beach

People come to Alki Beach from all over the region – but not always just to hang out. We just received this report about one group who visited Alki recently specifically to give the beach some TLC. And they have a request for you:

5th-grade students from Beacon Hill International School did a beach cleanup at Alki Beach on June 22nd. These students are part of the school Global Leadership Team and spent all year working on sustainability education at their school and in their community. The students had just held a 30-day single-use plastic ban at the school and choose to culminate the event by picking up plastics and other garbage along the beach. Students collected mostly plastic bottle caps, cigarette butts and a variety of small plastic particles that washed ashore during their low-tide cleanup.

The team would like to remind beachgoers this busy holiday weekend of the critical impact plastics have on our oceans and sea life and encourage everyone to refrain from using single-use plastic products, such as straws, cups and lids, cutlery or single use water bottles, whenever possible. Instead, bring your own reusable bottles, silverware, and containers, and take all your garbage with you. Help keep our beaches and seas healthy!

The students would also like to thank the folks at Pagliacci Pizza in West Seattle for donating pizzas and fully compostable products for the cleanup.

West Seattle schools: Arbor Heights Elementary students’ walking field trip to nearby greenspace-in-progress

June 19, 2016 5:46 pm
|    Comments Off on West Seattle schools: Arbor Heights Elementary students’ walking field trip to nearby greenspace-in-progress
 |   Delridge | Environment | West Seattle news | West Seattle schools

IMG_6791

Back on Duwamish Alive! day in April, one of the events we covered was at the 23rd/Findlay site that the Delridge Neighborhoods Development Association is turning into the Wetlands and Stewardship Project with the help of various partners. Among the beneficiaries and collaborators are local students, including those from the nearby Boren Building, where Arbor Heights Elementary is about to go into its final week. Teacher Angie Nall shared the photos and this report:

IMG_6807
Wanted to send some pics along from a walking field trip my 5th grade students from Arbor Heights Elementary went on to Delridge Wetlands on Findlay St SW in West Seattle. The kids worked with folks from Delridge Neighborhood Association, Nature Consortium, and the City of Seattle.

IMG_6804

The kids were the 3rd class to visit the site.

IMG_6798

They engaged in hands-on science, taking measurements of the run and rise of the water’s path on the property that eventually runs into Longfellow Creek. The wetlands are being restored to help clean the runoff naturally before it enters Longfellow Creek.

IMG_6793

Two 4th grade classes and one 5th grade class from K-STEM also worked on the project! We all are in the Louis Boren building on Delridge so the wetlands are a block away from the school- WHAT a cool opportunity for students and a benefit to the community!

DNDA welcomes help with the Wetlands and Stewardship Project – contact Willard Brown at willard@dnda.org if you’re interested in joining in.

West Seattle illegal tree cutting: Criminal, civil action both possible, Councilmember Herbold reports

1R9A7410enc1024px
(March WSB photo by Christopher Boffoli)

If you’ve been wondering what’s going on with the investigation of the illegal Duwamish Head Greenbelt tree-cutting in East Admiral – City Councilmember Lisa Herbold confirms it’s continuing, and that criminal and civil action are both possible. From an update she published today:

… The Seattle Police Department is continuing its investigation to determine if there is probable cause for criminal prosecution and will prepare a case to submit to the King County Prosecutor. The King County Prosecutor has jurisdiction over criminal felony prosecutions. The Police Department has conducted interviews and distributed flyers in the adjacent neighborhood for any information or leads. Last month, the Parks Department removed blackberry bushes for evidence of any previous cutting beyond the recent example, but didn’t find any additional tree cutting.

Separately from this effort to prepare a potential criminal violation, the City Attorney’s Office is also working to pursue potential civil action. It is likely that the office will issue one or more demand letters in the next few months, asking potentially responsible parties to pay the City damages and fines. If the King County Prosecutor declines to prosecute, the City Attorney’s Office may – at that time – decide to pursue a criminal action. Responsible parties may (1) be required to pay the City damages, civil fines and penalties, including restoration work, and also (2) face criminal penalties. It appears that the City has between 18 and 30 months during which to timely file a court case.

The City Attorney’s Office and Seattle Police Department are reluctant to publicly disclose additional information or additional specifics on their timeline as they believe that doing so could limit the effectiveness of the investigation and any prosecution or civil actions. …

Herbold’s update continues with details of the laws that could apply, and potential penalties – read it in its entirety here.

FOLLOWUP: Metro’s trash-can turnabout

(UPDATED FRIDAY NIGHT with trash can’s arrival)

IMG_4050

9:24 PM: Another followup tonight: This one, in the case of the 61st/Alki bus stop that is without a trash can because Metro says the one it used to have was used too much. On Wednesday, we published the response that Diana got from Metro after asking them to place a can there – it boiled down to “no.” We followed up with Metro spokesperson Jeff Switzer, including a question of whether it’s Metro policy to remove trash cans that are much-used. This evening, he sent word that they’ve changed their mind and will try a trash can there again:

Our records show Metro hasn’t had a trash can at that site since 2012 after seeing a pattern of it being misused by nearby businesses and residents, with home garbage showing up at the bus stop. It reached the point that our facilities crews were regularly receiving work orders and complaints about garbage, so we decided to remove it.

One of our thresholds in deciding whether to remove a trash can is if a location becomes so problematic that it generates a large number of work orders and crew time cleaning up a persistent problem, something that stretches beyond a transit issue into a community issue.

That said, we’re going to put a new 35-gallon can out there in the next few days, and will monitor how things go. If problems re-emerge beyond what Metro can address, we’ll see if we can get some help from the city and businesses to supply additional trash cans in the area.

We’ll keep an eye out for the new can – please let us know if you see it first.

ADDED FRIDAY NIGHT: The trash can has arrived. Diana sent the photo to prove it:

Trash Can 6-10-16

TERMINAL 5 PROJECT: How public hearing #1 unfolded tonight

(T-5, empty since summer 2014, in center of 2015 photo by Peter West Carey)

We went to tonight’s Terminal 5 Improvements Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement public hearing in Georgetown mostly to find out the format so you know what to expect at the one in West Seattle on Thursday night.

So you can plan, here’s the format:

5-6 pm, open house
6 pm, presentation, including project background and information on the environmental-review process
6:30 pm, opportunity for attendees to ask “clarifying questions”
6:45 pm until 8 pm (depending on how many speakers), public hearing
8-8:30 pm, open house

Spanish and Vietnamese interpreters were available.

After a welcome by Port Commissioner Fred Felleman, an overview of the “project purpose” was offered, showing that while the current T-5 (which has been closed to cargo for two years now) is set for 136′ maximum ship width, the largest ships out there now go to 193′, and that’s why they need to make it “big-ship ready.”

projectpurp

The project is sponsored by the Port of Seattle and the Northwest Seaport Alliance – its partnership with Tacoma – but Seattle is the lead agency and responsible for the environmental review, which it originally wasn’t going to do – then, after considerable citizen urging, it changed its mind, saying it had discovered that the project was likely to be big enough to mandate one anyway.

As you’ll see in the DEIS, three alternatives are reviewed: Read More

FOLLOWUP: Myers Way Parcels recommendations ‘short-sighted … slice-and-dice,’ say preservation supporters


(Click to see full-size PDF)

11:17 AM: For the first time since the city Finance and Administrative Services‘ “draft recommendations” about the Myers Way Parcels came out – May 25th, as first reported here – we’re hearing from the group that’s been the loudest voice for keeping the site as open space.

The Seattle Green Spaces Coalition calls FAS’s three-part recommendation (update – here’s the PDF summarizing it) “short-sighted,” saying that the city has been less than thorough in evaluating the site’s ecology and its value, and in reaching out to the community. Here’s its statement:

The 33 acres of Myers Parcels is the largest plot of undeveloped land that the City of Seattle owns. It provides a wide range of benefits for the City of Seattle, and people in the White Center, Highland Park, South Park, Roxbury, Delridge and Georgetown neighborhoods. The City’s Finance & Administrative Services (FAS) Department issued a formal Notice of Excess Property for a large area of Myers Parcels on January 15, 2016. But it only distributed notice to a limited number of people. Then on May 25, 2016, FAS presented its draft recommendation for disposing of Myers acreage at the Highland Park Action Committee meeting.

The Seattle Green Spaces Coalition (SGSC) finds the draft recommendation short-sighted, and calls on FAS to withdraw it. It also calls on FAS to significantly increase engagement with the affected neighborhoods, and to re-assess the Myers Parcels ecology.

The FAS Department’s top-down recommendation runs contrary to Mayor Murray’s Equity and Environmental Action Agenda, which call for grassroots, community-driven planning.

FAS recommends breaking up and selling off parts of Myers Parcels, before it has assessed the current value of this forested area, which contains a watershed with two streams that feed clean water into the Duwamish River.

SGSC is working with numerous individuals and community organizations, such as White Center Community Development Association (WCCDA), Delridge Neighborhoods Development Association and others, to demand robust community engagement, and clear strategies to promote environmental sustainability and social justice.

The FAS recommendation presents nothing new. It does not take into account any of the 400+ comments sent to FAS, nor the more than 800 signers on SGSC’s change.org petition calling for the City to stop the sale until communities are fully involved in the future of this site, and new environmental studies are conducted.

FAS recommends using part of the land immediately south of the Joint Training Facility for an expanded parking lot, selling the flat portion of the site for a commercial warehouse operation, and keeping the unmarketable wetlands and critical slope, with the addition of a possible adventure park on the critical slope above SR 509. FAS does not take into account that Myers Parcels holds origins of Hamm Creek, part of the most fragile link in Chinook Salmon Recovery, and within the Superfund Site of the first five miles of the Duwamish River.   Its plan does not keep that watershed healthy, or help to restore the Duwamish River and promote salmon habitat.   While we are spending millions of taxpayer dollars to clean up the Duwamish River, it makes no sense to jeopardize this watershed.  As a city we should be improving it, not building warehouses around it.

The land has healthy, mature trees that filter water, retain storm water run-off, control erosion, clean the air and help keep the city cool.   They create a green buffer for the communities of South Park and White Center.  Decreasing the green buffer by selling it for warehouse operations will degrade air quality with increased car and truck pollution. Increased hardscape will also increase stormwater runoff.  The inclusion of an adventure park can also potentially degrade the forest and wildlife habitat.

FAS’s recommendation to “slice and dice” this land, selling off parts of it, fails to recognize the land’s value as a whole. In a true “balance,” clean water and clear air would clearly win out over more warehouses that South Park and White Center do not need. 

Seattle Green Spaces Coalition demands meaningful community engagement and a valuation of all the benefits this land does and can continue to provide.  If we are going to live up to the commitment of the Equity & Environment Action Agenda and our Climate Action Plan, important questions must be answered:

·      What is the most environmentally friendly use of the land?
·      What is healthiest for the neighborhoods?
·      What ecosystem services will the proposed uses provide or reduce?
·      Will wildlife habitat be enhanced or reduced?
·      Will it be of use and used by the diverse communities?
·      What will its value be in the future for different uses?
·      How broadly will the land serve diverse community and the City?
·      How will it impact the watershed and recovery of the Duwamish River?
·      What are the land’s unique features and role in the ecosystem?
·      What will be the interplay of planned upland development of housing and the land?
·      Who will benefit from commercial development?
·      Would alternate uses such as fee activities benefit or exclude neighboring communities?

 So far, over 850 people have signed Seattle Green Spaces Coalition’s online petition demanding a robust, transparent and inclusive community engagement so that all people can participate in the decision-making process.

The city’s webpage with information about the parcels is here. Two weeks before the draft report came out, we toured part of the site with FAS reps, community members, and City Councilmember Lisa Herboldsee that report here.

ADDED 12:49 PM: We checked back with FAS’s Hillary Hamilton, who provided electronic versions of the draft-recommendations map and summary, both of which you’ll now see above. She says a public meeting is still planned but that they’re not yet ready to finalize the announcement. Meantime, comments are still being taken, she reiterates:

Comments are taken continuously through the review process, and a full report of people’s names and comments will be provided to the City Council before any decision is made. People can send comments at any time; we will acknowledge receipt. Those who contact us can be sure to be on the mailing list for updates. Email or regular postal mail is encouraged to Daniel Bretzke, Real Estate Services, Dept. of Finance and Administrative Services. Email is Daniel.bretzke@seattle.gov. Postal address is Daniel Bretzke, FAS Real Estate Services, P.O. Box 94689, Seattle, WA 98124-4689.

West Seattle schools: Taproot students’ study picks up where others … didn’t pick up

(Photo courtesy Michelle Taylor: Taproot students attend to a bag dispenser in Fauntleroy Park)

What Fauntleroy Creek/Watershed volunteers did in 2004 and 2008, students from Taproot School are doing now, according to watershed/creek steward Judy Pickens:

Continuing concern about pet waste left in Fauntleroy Park prompted students at Taproot School to take on the 2016 Poop Study.

The study documents the number and location of pet waste along a segment of trail in Fauntleroy Park that’s popular with dog walkers. After a baseline count earlier this spring, the students are reaching out to dog owners with information about why picking up after their pet is important and making compliance easy with free bags.

Located in the Fauntleroy Schoolhouse Community Center, Taproot School makes almost daily use of the park as an extension of classroom learning for its 27 (K-5) students. Run in 2004 and again in 2008, the study initiated by the Fauntleroy Watershed Council aims to reduce the level of fecal coliform bacteria that Fauntleroy Creek conveys into Puget Sound.

Students will do a second count in July and a third in September, then compile their report, with an emphasis on what more they recommend doing to get dog walkers to scoop.

CONGRATULATIONS! Chief Sealth IHS Green Team honored as Conservation Champion for project that might go district-wide

waterbottle
(In photo: Students Katia Oliva, Clarissa Perez, Brandon Edwards; Sealth grad & former Green Team president Jessie Dirks; teacher Noah Zeichner; YMCA Earth Service Corps instructor Tyrell Dozier)

Thanks to Nicole Sipila from the Chief Sealth International High School PTSA for sharing the news that the CSIHS Green Team has been “recognized as a 2015-16 Conservation Champion for their work to get water-bottle-filling stations installed in our school. We should have quotes for the work (this) week and we hope to see them in place before the 2016-17 school year. Great job!” Teacher Noah Zeichner, who provided the photo above from a school-board meeting last month, says the project has been in the works for two years, “when members realized they could reduce the use of plastic water bottles in their school if students had the ability to fill up reusable water bottles. … Not only did they get the green light to purchase filling stations at Chief Sealth, additionally they convinced the school board to pursue a $200,000 grant for filling stations in every single Seattle Public School.”

Nicole also shared this district-produced PDF with photos and profiles of other schools recognized around the city this year, including, from our area, Alki Elementary, Arbor Heights Elementary, Concord International, Pathfinder K-8, and West Seattle High School. Congratulations to all!

YOU CAN HELP! Seal Sitters training Monday; ‘Sentinels of the Sound’ cleanup June 4th

May 22, 2016 6:53 pm
|    Comments Off on YOU CAN HELP! Seal Sitters training Monday; ‘Sentinels of the Sound’ cleanup June 4th
 |   Environment | How to help | West Seattle news | Wildlife

seagull-with-trash-lindsey

(Photo by Robin Lindsey)

From Seal Sitters Marine Mammal Stranding Network, word of two ways you can help care for West Seattle shores and the creatures who share the beaches and waters with us – first, an announcement, second, a reminder:

Seal Sitters and the Alki Community Council will be co-sponsoring the “Sentinels of the Sound” beach cleanup at Alki Beach on Saturday, June 4th, 10 am-noon. There will be a very low tide that day, enabling access to a wide stretch of beach to remove dangerous debris. The adjacent sidewalks and street will also be scoured for trash – it is estimated that up to 80% of all trash discarded on land ends up as marine debris.

Trash poisons, maims, and kills wildlife. Lend a hand to help keep marine life safe and meet up at the Statue of Liberty Plaza. There will be a brief talk about the dangers of marine trash before dispersing to clean up the area. Last year, volunteers removed an estimated 9,000 toxic cigarette butts in approximately two hours.

Please visit our website for more details and the RSVP link. Volunteers do need to provide gloves and pickup sticks this year, but bags will be available at the sign-in table.

Now, the reminder – Seal Sitters training tomorrow!

Harbor-seal pupping season is on the horizon and Seal Sitters volunteers enable pups to rest safely on our urban beaches. We will be holding a training on Monday evening, May 23rd. There are just a few available spaces left to attend. Please visit the volunteer page of our website for info and to RSVP.

Seal Sitters welcomes volunteers of all ages.

VIDEO: Myers Parcels tour with Councilmember Lisa Herbold, as key decisions near

landgroup1

Story by Tracy Record
Photos by Patrick Sand
West Seattle Blog co-publishers

The future of the Myers Way Parcels – 30+ acres of city-owned land on the southeastern edge of West Seattle – may be decided by the end of the year.

Updates on the timetable and process were part of the discussion as a group organized by City Councilmember Lisa Herbold toured the site on Thursday. Among them, two staffers from the city Finance and Administrative Services department, which is responsible for city-owned real estate like this, a site that’s been considered for many things, even, in 2008, the municipal jail that ultimately never got built.

The city didn’t even want most of this land when it was purchased back in the early 2000s, FAS’s Hillary Hamilton and Michael Ashbrook explained – just 10 acres for the nearby Joint Training Facility, which is in plain view next door to the north:

landjtf

Then-owner Nintendo of America would only sell the entire 50-acre parcel, so that’s what the city bought.

Now it is stuck in a multi-faceted tug-of-war:

Read More

Milestones ahead for Murray overflow-control project at Lowman Beach

May 10, 2016 7:27 pm
|    Comments Off on Milestones ahead for Murray overflow-control project at Lowman Beach
 |   Environment | Utilities | West Seattle news

(2010 WSB photo – generator truck at Lowman Beach after power outage-caused overflow)

What you see above shouldn’t ever be needed again at Lowman Beach, because of work that’s about to happen at the Murray Combined Sewer Overflow Control Project site and Murray Pump Station next door: A portable generator to power the pump station in times of trouble. Today’s update from the King County Wastewater Treatment Division explains why – along with providing an alert to work that will affect that end of Beach Drive starting tomorrow:

Lane closure on 7000 block of Beach Drive SW tomorrow – May 11 – while crews set standby generator inside facility

King County’s Murray Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) Control Project contractor will use a second crane to set a standby generator inside the facility building’s southern end. The standby generator will provide backup power to the entire facility and to the existing Murray Pump Station. The pump station currently does not have a standby generator, which created odor and overflow issues in the past.

Crews will use a second crane for one day to set the generator in place. Beach Drive SW will be narrowed to one lane to make space for the second crane. Flaggers will direct traffic on the 7000 block of Beach Drive SW. Drivers can expect delays of up to 15 minutes while the work occurs.

The contractor will then start installing the final section of the 5-foot-wide sewer pipe connecting the new tank to the existing pump station. The pipe will be installed along the southeast side of Beach Drive SW. It will take one month to install the pipe. Shoring installation will occur intermittently throughout the month. Increased noise and vibration is expected at times during shoring work.

Thank you for your continued patience during construction. Please contact the project hotline at 206-205-9186 with any questions or concerns.

As reported here recently, KCWTD told the Fauntleroy Community Association that the project will be done before the end of this year.

Nature Consortium merging into Delridge Neighborhoods Development Association; executive director Merica Whitehall leaving

Two big announcements today regarding West Seattle-based nonprofit Nature Consortium, known for its forest-restoration work and melding of arts and nature, in education and other activities:

Executive director Merica Whitehall (WSB file photo at left) is leaving after a year and a half, departing in mid-May to become executive director of Fontenelle Forest in her home state, Nebraska.

There won’t be a search for a successor because of the other big news – Nature Consortium will become a project of Delridge Neighborhoods Development Association, the nonprofit that runs Youngstown Cultural Arts Center, where NC is based. According to DNDA’s David Bestock, NC will be “retaining its own branding and programs, but with operations and finances run through DNDA,” and that’s why it won’t have its own executive director any more.

Bestock adds, “All NC programs will continue as they are, as well as NC staff other than Merica, who was sought out and recruited by the organization she’s moving to in her home state of Nebraska. Willard Brown, DNDA’s Properties and Housing Director, who has been spearheading DNDA’s environmental justice programming in Delridge and partnering with NC, will become even more involved in supporting NC’s staff and programs. … We are still working out details for how this will look structurally, but it made lots of sense to everyone when Nature Consortium approached us with their proposal. Our missions have a ton of overlap in terms of social and environmental justice, preservation of local greenspace, etc. The staff and board of both orgs feel that together we can do more for our shared community by combining our resources to address the educational, health, and economic disparities that exist in Delridge.”

The official news release about all of the above is here.

FOLLOWUP: Parks’ work at East Admiral tree-cutting site

gullygizmo2
(WSB photo)

If you were among the Admiral-area residents who noticed helicopters overhead at midday … no crime, no crash, just TV crews looking for an aerial view of what you see above: As reported here Tuesday, Seattle Parks sent this piece of heavy equipment called a Spyder to the slopes where news of illegal tree-cutting sparked an outcry back in March. As we first heard from City Councilmember Lisa Herbold on Tuesday, Parks decided to send the crew to clear away blackberry overgrowth and look for any further evidence of trees cut beyond the 100+ already estimated, while helping prep the site for “eventual restoration.” Otherwise, the city says the investigation continues; no charges so far. The work is expected to continue tomorrow.

FOLLOWUPS: West Seattle illegal-tree-cutting investigations; work planned at East Admiral site

Two notes today on the investigations of illegal tree-cutting in north West Seattle’s Duwamish Head Greenbelt:

_B8A7585enc1024px
(March photo by WSB’s Christopher Boffoli)

35TH SW ‘CLEAR-CUT’ SITE: No word of charges against anyone yet, but City Councilmember Lisa Herbold shared an alert that there will be “activity” the next two days at the site off the 3200 block of 35th SW, where cutting apparently done in January came to light in March. She says, “As part of the City’s investigation into the cutting of City trees near 3200 35th Ave SW, a contractor will remove blackberry bushes from the site on May 4th and 5th. The removal should reveal whether there are additional stumps, and will also help prepare the site for eventual restoration.”

ADDED 10:12 PM: Parks spokesperson Dewey Potter provided a few more details, saying the contractor “… will bring a large machine called a Spyder to the site of the trees cut … A crew from Kemp West will use the machine to clear the dense blackberries from the site. … The City’s investigation of the incident continues.” The work could start as early as 7 am.

(back to original report) SUNSET/SEATTLE SITE: As first reported here last Friday, the city also is investigating illegal tree-cutting on a Parks-owned slope beneath a popular unofficial roadside viewpoint. The investigation came to light because of a letter sent to area residents, asking if they had information on the cutting, believed to have been done in February. We subsequently had asked Parks how many trees they believe were cut; spokesperson Christina Hirsch now tells WSB that they’re expecting the number after a city arborist visits the steeply sloped site this week for an assessment.

ILLEGAL TREE-CUTTING: City investigating another case, in North Admiral

By Tracy Record
West Seattle Blog editor

The city is investigating another case of illegal tree-cutting in north West Seattle’s Duwamish Head Greenbelt.

Seattle Parks confirmed to WSB that there is an “ongoing investigation” involving tree-cutting on city-owned land near a popular informal roadside viewpoint in North Admiral, at Sunset and Seattle.

Two area residents told us about a letter sent to “neighbors,” seeking information about the tree-cutting, which the city believes happened in February. One neighbor sent us images of both sides of the letter, which Parks spokesperson Christina Hirsch confirmed to WSB is authentic.

This is the photo in the letter:

IMG_0193

Above that photo, the letter begins:

We need your cooperation to resolve an illegal use of park property: unauthorized treecutting in Duwamish Head Greenbelt. This tree-cutting violates Seattle Municipal Code 18.12.070 and the responsible person(s) are subject to fines to cover the cost to replace the trees and maintain them until they are established.

The second page includes this “ground-level” view of the site where the illegal tree-cutting happened:

IMG_0194

The letter continues:

We need the cooperation of neighbors and concerned park users to be the “ears and eyes on the ground” to ensure the protection of our valuable open space, keep our park areas safe, and maintain a peaceful environment for all the public to enjoy.

If you have any information about who cut the trees, or if you observed any tree-cutting activity anywhere within the park, please phone me directly at 206-615-0932. Verbal information given can remain anonymous by request and is not subject to public disclosure.

Richard Gholaghong
Senior Property Agent, Seattle Parks and Recreation

We called Gholaghong after receiving the letter via text, and he indicated he was heading into a meeting but would reply with more information soon. We subsequently received a note from Hirsch only confirming that the letter was for real, that the investigation was ongoing, and that she was looking into the answer to our question about how many trees were cut.

A visit to Seattle/Sunset did not yield a firsthand view of the reported tree-cutting – the slope down from the street side is extremely steep, and the downslope view is blocked by overgrown including blackberry vines. County files indicate the city bought the 2 1/2-acre site for less than a quarter-million dollars in 1992.

We will continue trying to find out more about this case, which emerged one month after The Seattle Times first reported on a large-scale case of illegal tree-cutting in east Admiral, also in the Duwamish Head Greenbelt. We have continued to follow up on that case, but there is nothing new to report, and no word yet of charges.

FOLLOWUP: Rain-or-shine Recycle Roundup scored big

recyclerdp
(WSB photo from Sunday)

West Seattleites were clearly not going to let the rain keep them away from the Recycle Roundup at Fauntleroy Church last Sunday. Judy Pickens reports a big haul:

West Seattleites braved Sunday’s downpour to bring 11.5 tons to the spring Recycle Roundup at Fauntleroy Church for responsible recycling by 1 Green Planet. It was one of the largest collections since the church’s green committee started the roundup in 2010. The fall roundup will be Sunday, Sept. 25.

Last fall’s RR brought in 9 tons, following a 10-ton day last spring.

HAPPENING NOW: Recycling in the rain

aprilpickup1

At Fauntleroy Church (9140 California SW), the rain’s not stopping the twice-yearly Recycle Roundup, on until 3 pm today. We stopped by in the first hour and found people dropping off everything from an old TV antenna to an exercise cycle.

aprilpickup2

There’s no charge to drop off your recyclables as long as they’re on the list; the church’s Green Committee coordinates this every spring and fall with recycler 1 Green Planet and will of course accept donations to cover their expenses, but that’s totally voluntary. They have one request: Please DON’T wait until the end of the day – after 2:30, there can be a long line.

RECYCLE ROUNDUP SUNDAY: One more reminder

(WSB photo from past Recycle Roundup)

Getting ready for West Seattle Community Garage Sale Day (three weeks from today!) and realizing not everything is sellable, even at the low-low-low-make-an-offer level? Or, just de-cluttering in general? One more reminder – tomorrow is the spring edition of the twice-annual Recycle Roundup in the Fauntleroy Church parking lot at 9140 California SW. 9 am-3 pm. Drop your recyclables off for free, as long as they’re on this list (which also points out what the church Green Committee‘s Recycle Roundup partner 1 Green Planet definitely WON’T take). One more thing: The earlier you can get there in that six-hour window, the better.

EARTH DAY: Community cleanup & playground planning @ Highland Park Elementary

April 21, 2016 2:19 pm
|    Comments Off on EARTH DAY: Community cleanup & playground planning @ Highland Park Elementary
 |   Environment | Highland Park | West Seattle news

Celebrate Earth Day weekend by helping out with a community cleanup. We’re mentioning the ones we’ve heard about – yesterday, we featured Saturday’s North Delridge cleanup, and today, this announcement from the Highland Park Elementary School PTA:

Saturday is the second annual HPE Earth Day Cleanup. This year we are working together with the Playground Planning Committee to both clean up the school and design our future playground. The Earth Day portion of the event will meet at the front of the school from 9:00 – 12:00, rain or shine. Come prepared to clean up and beautify the school grounds. The playground planning portion of the event is from 8:00 – 4:00. Come to either event, or both. Stay for 30 minutes, or all day! Coffee and lunch will be provided.

HPE is at 1012 SW Trenton. The Highland Park community also has a series of neighborhood cleanups planned – more on that later – and if you’re looking for volunteers for your cleanup, we’d love to help; e-mail the information to editor@westseattleblog.com – thanks!

WP-Backgrounds by InoPlugs Web Design and Juwelier Schönmann