CSO-control project updates: Truck routes revealed for Murray; drilling time for Barton

February 14, 2014 at 3:29 pm | In Environment, Utilities, West Seattle news | Comments Off

Updates on both of our area’s King County Wastewater Treatment “combined-sewer overflow control” projects today:


(Click image to see full-size PDF)
MURRAY PROJECT ‘HAUL ROUTES’: Community members have long been asking which route trucks will use to get to and from the Murray (basin) CSO project site across from Lowman Beach, once excavation begins for its million-gallon storage tank. Morgan Community Association president Deb Barker got the word on Thursday that the routes had been finalized and published on the project website – see the map above. We asked KCWT when people along those routes will see the resulting truck traffic. From spokesperson Annie Kolb-Nelson:

Peak truck traffic is expected between April and December 2014 for the following activities: between April and July during the placement of secant piles that will act as support walls; between August and October for the excavation of the storage tank; and between October and December for tank construction (bringing in concrete and materials to the site.) During these time periods, the truck traffic will occur all day long. Work hours are 7-6 on weekdays. Any weekend work would be a special request by the contractor and if it was granted, King County would notify the community. Congestion at the site will be minimized by staging trucks away from the site and having them arrive at the site in a coordinated manner.

As for when the “primary” route would be used and when the “secondary” route would be used instead, that information isn’t available yet but we’ll add it when it is.

BARTON PROJECT PRE-CONSTRUCTION WORK: The Barton (basin) CSO project involves roadside raingardens on certain blocks in Sunrise Heights – and part of the support structure involves wells:

The construction was previewed during the recent pre-construction meetings (WSB coverage here). What’s being drilled at the south end of each raingarden block – 15 blocks getting 91 raingardens in the next year and a half – is a “deep infiltration well.” That’s considered pre-construction work; this year’s official construction schedule, block by block, is here.

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