Followup: Police report now out on the ‘chainsaw break-in’

December 22, 2011 at 1:45 pm | In Crime, West Seattle news | 8 Comments

In our first report Tuesday about Southwest Precinct Officer Scott Luckie‘s “tweetalong,” we mentioned his account of an incident the previous day involving someone reportedly using a chainsaw to try to break into a house. The police-report narrative on that case is now available, and here’s the story it tells – involving TWO chainsaws, and more:

From the report:

It happened Monday morning in the 6300 block of 23rd SW, and it was the second time police had been called to the home that day. The victim explained to police that there’s an ongoing “civil dispute” between her family and the suspect, who “is claiming to be the owner of the home,” according to the police report, while the victim is living there “on a rent-to-own basis,” and apparently some sort of court action is under way.

Police first were called when the suspect showed up at 11:15 Monday morning with a locksmith; the victim discovered this when she heard “banging.” She showed the locksmith some sort of documentation, and the locksmith left. Discovering the garage-door keypad broken, the victim called 911; police responded, and, according to the report, talked with both the victim and suspect, who left – then came back, tore a string of Christmas lights off the house, yelled “This isn’t over,” and left when the victim said she would call police.

It apparently wasn’t. Here’s what happened next, directly from the report (S is for suspect, V for victim – the report blacks out all names):

The suspect returned a third time, but this time he brought an electric chainsaw. S/ plugged the chainsaw into an outside outlet near the garage door. The S/ activated the chainsaw and was threatening the victims. The victims turned off the electricity to stop the threat from the suspect’s electric chainsaw. V again called 911 and I responded.

The suspect was not there when I arrived on the scene, and was reported to have left in a blue Avalanche. I conducted my investigation and provided V/ with a case number for the incident. I returned to the SW Precinct to write my report. At the precinct, I heard RADIO broadcast that the suspect had returned. This time, the suspect had returned with a gas-powered chainsaw.

V/ yelled for everyone in the house to get in to a room. W/ told the suspect to leave, but the suspect continued to advance with the chainsaw. V/ displayed a rifle and the suspect retreated to his vehicle and drove away. I arrived at the scene and instructed RADIO to have V/ step out of the residence.

Over RADIO, I heard it broadcasted that a man had driven to the SW Precinct to report that someone had pulled a gun on him. I had reason to believe that this would be S and had two SPD Officers respond to the precinct to contact the suspect.

However, the report goes on to say, he didn’t wait there, but went back to the house, where he emerged from a vehicle and “yelled at (the officer) about a woman pulling a gun on him.”

The suspect was arrested for investigation of harassment. After getting approval to search the vehicle he’d come back in, police wrote, the evidence they found inside included a chainsaw (whether electric or gas, the report doesn’t say) and possibly counterfeit currency.

8 Comments

  1. klampits

    Comment by Marcus M — 2:52 pm December 22, 2011 #

  2. I’m hearing the theme from “COPS” in my head – “Bad boys, bad boys, whatcha goin’ to do, whatcha goin’ to do when they come for you.”

    Comment by Kate K — 3:28 pm December 22, 2011 #

  3. It is terrible that officers have to risk their lives over this kind of behavior. And they have to do it while under constant criticism and “hating” by people who in most cases aren’t even from here.

    Comment by JoAnne — 3:36 pm December 22, 2011 #

  4. Joanne-if your referring to the criticism SPD is getting for violating the Constitutional rights of citizens over 20% of the time as reported by the DOJ then you simply don’t understand what being a real police officer is. Good cops need to stand up and be accounted for by holding their fellow officers to higher standards.
    Your soap box has nothing to do with the fact that most citizens respect officers and understand the danger they face, Citizens pay officers salaries for their professionalism, not for their abuse of power.

    Comment by Neighbor — 4:57 pm December 22, 2011 #

  5. i have nothing but the uptmost respect for law enforcement officers who genuinely strive to do what the rest of us seem unable to do “keep the peace”. stupid stupid people…

    Comment by jw — 5:05 pm December 22, 2011 #

  6. 20% is a ridiculous lie, and no one should be naive enough to trust Eric Holder’s justice dept. Not after fast and furious.

    Comment by JoAnne — 5:05 pm December 23, 2011 #

  7. WHAT DO WE LIVE IN A TRAILER PARK?

    Comment by tk — 12:40 pm December 25, 2011 #

  8. The SPD (Seattle and Spokane) have self destructed their own reputation. I don’t trust them and avoid them at all costs. I don’t hate them and I will not impede their operations. It’s my opinion that the police unions in both cities are nothing more than a cabal. . . . Loose them, you lose most of the problems.

    Comment by Bill — 1:41 pm December 27, 2011 #

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