Duwamish Alive! at T-107 Park: New launch, new bench, new sign

April 16, 2011 at 2:13 pm | In Environment, Rotary Club of West Seattle, West Seattle news | 1 Comment

Cari Simson of the Duwamish RIver Cleanup Coalition estimated 1,100 volunteers have been part of today’s Duwamish Alive! events at 13 spots from Alki south to Tukwila – and more than 75 of them were here at Port of Seattle-owned T-107 Park, for a ceremony that just concluded the day’s work. Top, the Blue Heron Canoe (read about it here) heading out from the new hand-carry launch at the park; (added) here’s video after it launched, with skipper Mike Evans of the Snohomish Tribe asking permission to proceed, while, offcamera, James Rasmussen of DRCC and Duwamish Tribe welcomes the canoe:

Below, the new bench the Rotary Club of West Seattle just dedicated in honor of the late Ken Wise (His son, Tom is at the far right in the photo).

Many more photos, and video – those speaking here included Duwamish Tribe chair Cecile Hansen, King County Executive Dow Constantine, Seattle City Council President Richard Conlin, and Port of Seattle Commissioner Gael Tarleton – to come, including the unveiling of the new interpretive sign here. The followup event that’s getting under way now is an Earth Day Festival at Pathfinder K-8 School on Pigeon Point.

ADDED 8:32 PM: As promised, additional photos ahead:

The bench installation got finishing touches right up until dedication. Its honoree, Ken Wise, was a longtime Rotarian – memorialized here. Club members also had been working today on cleanup and plantings – next time you go to T-107 Park, be careful of the pink-flagged new plants:

More volunteer work was put in today by Boy Scouts, from Pack 793, for the sign installation:

You can bet they were full of pride when the sign itself was unveiled:

(Click here to see and read what’s on the sign.) We mentioned high-profile speakers at the event. Video from their remarks is in the works. But first, the photos – not far from her tribe’s beloved Longhouse, Duwamish chair Cecile Hansen clutched eagle feathers as she welcomed the crowd:

County Executive Constantine spoke of one of his passions – working to protect and restore the environment – noting the cleanup of the Duwamish River itself is a vital part of that:

Another partner in the cleanup, the Port of Seattle, represented by Commissioner Tarleton, who spoke of the volunteer work – as well as what elected officials are doing – leaving a legacy for those yet to come:

After speeches, it was on to the beach to celebrate the new ramp. Greg Whittaker from Alki Kayak Tours and Mountain to Sound Outfitters was there with a stand-up paddleboard:

But the star of the waterborne show was the Blue Heron Canoe, whose first trip down the river included Native American youth:

Those who didn’t get a canoe ride watched from shore:

If you’ve never been to T-107 Park, it’s one of those West Seattle well-kept secrets, slightly off the proverbial beaten path, right on the western shore of the Duwamish off West Marginal Way SW.

1 Comment

  1. Great Tide of Change

    I told my daughter when she is 50years old The DUAMISH river will be different. The balance will with tremendouse effort hopefully be restored and healthy, abundunt sealife regenerated on her shores.
    BRAVO!!!

    Comment by jet city girl — 11:21 pm April 16, 2011 #

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